Willys-Knight

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Willys-Knight is an automobile that was produced between 1914 and 1933 by the Willys-Overland Company of Toledo, Ohio.

Willys-Knight
1928 Willys-Knight 70A (13972981427).jpg
1928 Willys-Knight Series 70A Light Six
Overview
Manufacturer Willys
Assembly Elyria, Ohio (1913-15)
Toledo, Ohio (1915-1937)
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door sedan
2-door coupe
Layout FR layout
Willys-Knight Great Six roadster, 1929-1930

John North Willys purchased the Edwards Motor Car Company of Long Island, New York, in 1913, moving the operation to Elyria, Ohio, where Willys owned the plant that had previously manufactured the Garford automobile. Production began with a four-cylinder model which was priced in the $2,500 price range. The Willys-Knight employed a Knight sleeve valve engine, generally four- and six-cylinder models.

In 1915, Willys moved assembly of the Willys-Knight to Toledo, Ohio, but continued manufacturing the engines in Elyria. Willys-Knight introduced a sleeve-valve V8 in 1917, which was sold until 1919.

Willys-Knight enjoyed a production run average of 50,000 cars per year after 1922. Willys also purchased Stearns-Knight of Cleveland, Ohio, which also used a sleeve valve Knight Engine, making that marque the crown jewel in his growing automotive empire.

Willys-Knight production ended in November 1932 (model year 1933) when the company, in receivership, stopped building higher priced cars, and instead focused on the manufacture of the inexpensive but durable Willys 77.

Seven Willys-Knight vehicles including two large trucks and a touring car were used on the Martin and Osa Johnson photographic safari in the remotest areas of Africa.

The 178 CID "Light Six" engine in a 1926 Series 70

See also[edit]


Models[edit]

Model Period Cylinders Displacement Performance Wheelbase
K 17 1915 4 Cyl. 276.4 cu in (4,530 cc) 45 bhp (33 kW)
K 19 1915 4 Cyl. 276.4 cu in (4,530 cc) 45 bhp (33 kW) 3,048 mm (120.0 in)
84/84B 1916-1917 4 Cyl. 40 hp (30 kW) 2,896 mm (114.0 in)
88-4 1917–1919 4 Cyl. 40 hp (30 kW) 2,896 mm (114.0 in)
88-6 1917 6 Cyl. 45 bhp (33 kW) 3,175 mm (125.0 in)
88-8 1917–1920 8 Cyl. 65 bhp (48 kW) 3,175 mm (125.0 in)
20 1920–1922 4 Cyl. 185.8 cu in (3,044 cc) 48 bhp (35 kW) 2,997 mm (118.0 in)
27 1922 4 Cyl.
64 1923–1924 4 Cyl. 185.8 cu in (3,044 cc) 40 hp (30 kW) 2,997 mm (118.0 in)
67 1923–1924
1925
4 Cyl. 185.8 cu in (3,044 cc) 40 hp (30 kW)
42 hp (31 kW)
3,150 mm (124.0 in)
65 1925 4 Cyl. 40 bhp (29 kW)[1] 3,150 mm (124.0 in)
66 1925–1926 6 Cyl. 236.4 cu in (3,874 cc) 60 bhp (44 kW) 3,200 mm (126.0 in)
70 1926 6 Cyl. 177.9 cu in (2,915 cc) 53 bhp (39 kW) 2,870 mm (113.0 in)
66 A[2] 1927
1928-1929
6 Cyl. 236.4 cu in (3,874 cc)
255.0 cu in (4,178 cc)
65 hp (48 kW)
70 hp (52 kW)
3,200 mm (126.0 in) / 3,429 mm (135.0 in)
70 A 1927-1929 6 Cyl. 177.9 cu in (2,915 cc) 53 hp (40 kW) 2,883 mm (113.5 in)
56, 56 A 1928–1929 6 Cyl. 157.6 cu in (2,582 cc) 45 bhp (33 kW) 2,781 mm (109.5 in)
70 B 1929–1930 6 Cyl. 177.9 cu in (2,915 cc) 53 bhp (39 kW) 2,858 mm (112.5 in)
66 B 1930 6 Cyl. 255.0 cu in (4,178 cc) 87 bhp (64 kW) 3,048 mm (120.0 in)
87 1930-1931 6 Cyl. 45 bhp (33 kW) 2,781 mm (109.5 in)
66 D 1931–1932 6 Cyl. 255.0 cu in (4,178 cc) 87 bhp (64 kW) 3,073 mm (121.0 in)
95 Deluxe[2] 1931-1932 6 Cyl. 177.9 cu in (2,915 cc) 60 hp (45 kW) 2,870 mm (113.0 in)
66 E 1933 6 Cyl. 255.0 cu in (4,178 cc) 87 bhp (64 kW) 3,073 mm (121.0 in)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kimes, Beverly (1996). standard catalog of American Cars 1805-1942. Krause publications. ISBN 0-87341-428-4. 
  2. ^ a b "Willys-Knight History". Willys-Overland-Knight Registry (WOKR). Retrieved 2015-08-30.