Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant

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Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant
Wolsong (04790183).jpg
Official name월성원자력발전소
月城原子力發電所
CountrySouth Korea
LocationGyeongju, North Gyeongsang
Coordinates35°43′0″N 129°28′40″E / 35.71667°N 129.47778°E / 35.71667; 129.47778Coordinates: 35°43′0″N 129°28′40″E / 35.71667°N 129.47778°E / 35.71667; 129.47778
StatusOperational
Construction beganUnit 1: October 30, 1977
Unit 2: September 25, 1992
Unit 3: March 17, 1994
Unit 4: July 22, 1994
Unit 5: November 20, 2007
Unit 6: September 23, 2008
Commission dateUnit 1: April 22, 1983
Unit 2: July 1, 1997
Unit 3: July 1, 1998
Unit 4: October 1, 1999
Unit 5: July 31, 2012
Unit 6: July 24, 2015
Owner(s)Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power
Operator(s)Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power
Nuclear power station
Reactor typeCANDU PHWR
PWR
Reactor supplierAECL
KEPCO E&C
Cooling sourceSea of Japan
(East sea of Korea)
Power generation
Units operational1 × 657 MW
1 × 647 MW
1 × 651 MW
1 × 653 MW
1 × 997 MW
1 × 993 MW
Make and model4 × CANDU-6
2 × OPR-1000
Thermal capacity4 × 2061 MWth
2 × 2825 MWth
Nameplate capacity4598 MW
Capacity factor75.25%
Annual net output30,310 GW·h (2016)

The Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant, or Wolsong,[1] is a nuclear power plant located on the coast near Nae-ri, Yangnm-myeon, Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang province, South Korea. It is the only South Korean nuclear power plant operating CANDU-type PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors).[2] Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power owns the plant.[3] These reactors are capable of consuming multiple types of fuel, including wastes from South Koreas other nuclear plants.

The power plant site including Yangnam-myeon. Yangbuk-myeon and Gampo-eup was designated an industrial infrastructure development zone in 1976. Construction of Wolseong 1 started in 1976 and was completed in 1982. In the following year, the power plant began commercial operations. This PHWR reactor has a gross generation capacity of 678 MW. Wolseong reactors 2, 3 and 4 were completed in 1997, 1998 and 1999, respectively. Each of these reactors has a capacity of 700 MW. Wolseong Nuclear Plant has since operated successfully.[2]

Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant supplies about 5% of South Korea's electricity.[4]

Shin-Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant[edit]

Shin-Wolsong No. 1 and No. 2, are two new OPR-1000 type pressurized water reactors. Shin-Wolsong 1 became fully operational in July 2012.[1][5][6]

In June 2013 Shin-Wolsong 1 was shutdown, and Shin-Wolsong 2 ordered to remain offline, until safety-related control cabling with forged safety certificates is replaced.[7] Shin Wolsong-1 was approved for restart in January 2014.[8] In November 2014, Shin Wolsong-2 loaded its first core of nuclear fuel,[8] and the plant was connected to the grid in February 2015,[9] with commercial operation commencing in July 2015.[10]

Unit Type Capacity
(net)
Construction start Operation start Notes
Phase I
Wolsong-1 CANDU-6 657 MW 30 Oct 1977 22 April 1983 [11]
Wolsong-2 CANDU-6 647 MW 22 June 1992 1 July 1997 [12]
Wolsong-3 CANDU-6 651 MW 17 March 1994 1 July 1998 [13]
Wolsong-4 CANDU-6 653 MW 22 July 1994 1 Oct 1999 [14]
Phase II
Shin Wolsong-1 OPR-1000 997 MW 20 Nov 2007 31 July 2012 [15]
Shin Wolsong-2 OPR-1000 993 MW 23 Sept 2008 24 July 2015 [16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Korea, Republic of". Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  2. ^ a b (in Korean) 경주시의 산업·교통 (Industry and Transportation of Gyeongju) Nate / Encyclopedia of Korean Culture
  3. ^ (Sep 10, 2007) ATS wins South Korea nuclear deal TheStar.com / Canadian Press
  4. ^ "KHNP Fact Sheet". CANDU Owners Group website. Retrieved August 31, 2009. See also site.
  5. ^ Wolseong Nuclear Power plant Korea Neclear Energy Foundation
  6. ^ Matthew L. Wald, (January 10, 1991) TALKING DEALS; Help for Canada's Nuclear Industry The New York Times
  7. ^ "New component issues idle Korean reactors". World Nuclear News. 28 May 2013. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  8. ^ a b "Shin Wolsong 2 fuel loading completed". World Nuclear News. 21 November 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2014.
  9. ^ "Grid connection for South Korean reactor". World Nuclear News. 26 February 2015. Retrieved 3 March 2015.
  10. ^ "South Korean reactor enters commercial operation". World Nuclear News. 24 July 2015. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  11. ^ "Wolsong-1". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013.
  12. ^ "Wolsong-2". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013.
  13. ^ "Wolsong-3". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013.
  14. ^ "Wolsong-4". PRIS. IAEA. 24 July 2015. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  15. ^ "Shin-Wolsong-1". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013.
  16. ^ "Shin-Wolsong-2". PRIS. IAEA. 25 July 2015. Retrieved 25 July 2015.

External links[edit]