Zeyda and the Hitman

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Zeyda and the Hitman
Zeyda and the Hitman.jpg
Genre Comedy
Created by Miracle Pictures
in association with
Frantic Films
Written by Michael Amo
Directed by Melanie Mayron
Starring Judd Hirsch
Gil Bellows
Danny Aiello
Mercedes Ruehl
Conrad Dunn
Reagan Pasternak
Theme music composer Michael Shields
Country of origin Canada
Original language(s) English
Production
Producer(s) Paul Brown
Editor(s) Ronald Sanders
Running time 87 minutes
Release
Original network CTV Television Network
Original release June 20, 2004

Zeyda and the Hitman (U.S. title Running with the Hitman) is a 2004 Canadian television film comedy. The story is about a grandfather who hires a contract killer to assassinate his allergy-prone son-in-law.

Production[edit]

The movie was filmed in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The title design was by Cuppa Coffee Studios, Toronto. The film was released on DVD on 5 September 2006, and carries an MPAA rating of NR.[1]

Based on a true story[edit]

The film's storyline is based on the true-life Tully "peanut plot" case related in Adrian Humphreys' biography of Marvin "the Weasel" Elkind, titled The Weasel: A Double Life in the Mob. Jack Tully (named Gideon Schub in the film and played by Judd Hirsch) hired Marvin Elkind (named Nathan "The Nat" Winkler in the film and played by Danny Aiello) to kill Tully's son-in-law, Martin Fisher (named Jeff Klein in the film and played by Gil Bellows), who had a problematic relationship with Tully's daughter, Lynda. Moreover, Lynda had faxed her father a letter advising him that he could not see his grandchildren, aged 10 and five, without Fisher's permission.

As Fisher was severely allergic to peanuts, Tully suggested that Elkind poison Fisher's food with a smear of peanut butter or his drink with drop of peanut oil, to trigger death by anaphylactic shock. Tully gave the would-be hitman a $1,000 downpayment for the hit, $200 to buy Fisher drinks, and the murder weapons: a jar of Kraft peanut butter and a bottle of peanut oil. Elkind, a police informant who also worked in the criminal underworld as well as volunteered as a security officer at the synagogue where he and Tully met, turned Tully in to the police and testified against him in court. Tully still had the receipts for the murder weapons in his pocket, when arrested.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "All editions of Running With the Hitman". blockbuster.com. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  2. ^ Humphreys, Adrian (2011). "50: "Toronto, 1998"". The Weasel: A Double Life in the Mob (1st ed.). Wiley. ISBN 978-0470964514. 
  3. ^ "The Weasel". wiley-vch.de. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 

External links[edit]