1939 in comics

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Notable events of 1939 in comics. See also List of years in comics.



Events and publications[edit]

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Year overall[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

  • Ace Comics #23 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #9 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #35 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #6 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #24 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #17 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #40 - National Periodical Publications

March[edit]

  • Ace Comics #24 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #10 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #36 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #7 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #25 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #18 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #41 - National Periodical Publications

April[edit]

  • Ace Comics #25 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #11 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #37 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #1 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #8 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #26 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #19 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #42 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics (1939 series) #1 - National Periodical Publications

May[edit]

  • Ace Comics #26 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #12 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #38 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #2 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #9 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #27 - National Allied Publications - First appearance of Bat-Man
  • Feature Funnies #20 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #43 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #2 - National Periodical Publications

June[edit]

  • Ace Comics #27 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #13 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #39 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #3 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #10 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #28 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics (previously Feature Funnies) #21 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #44 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #3 - National Periodical Publications
  • Superman (1939 series) #1, cover dated Summer - National Periodical Publications[1]

July[edit]

  • Ace Comics #28 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #14 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #40 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #4 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #11 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #29 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #22 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #45 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #4 - National Periodical Publications
  • The Magic Comic #1 - D. C. Thomson & Co.

August[edit]

  • Ace Comics #29 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #15 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #41 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #5 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #12 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #30 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #23 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #46 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #5 - National Periodical Publications
  • Smash Comics (1939 series) #1 - Quality Comics

September[edit]

  • Newspaper strip Ben Bowyang by Alex Gurney begins publication
  • Ace Comics #30 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #16 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #42 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #6 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics (1939 series) #5 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #13 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #31 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #24 - Quality Comics
  • Four Color Series 1 (1939 series) #1 - Dell Publishing
    • First comic-book appearance of Dick Tracy, previously seen in comic strips beginning 1931
  • More Fun Comics #47 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #6, last issue - National Periodical Publications
  • Smash Comics #2 - Quality Comics
  • Superman #2, cover dated Fall - National Periodical Publications

October[edit]

  • Ace Comics #31 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #17 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #43 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #7 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #6 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #14 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #32 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #25 - Quality Comics
  • Four Color Series 1 #2 - Dell Publishing
  • Marvel Comics (becomes Marvel Mystery Comics) (1939 series) #1 - Timely Comics
  • More Fun Comics #48 - National Periodical Publications
  • Smash Comics #3 - Quality Comics

November[edit]

  • Ace Comics #32 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #18 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #44 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #8 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #7 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #15 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #33 - National Allied Publications
  • Double Action Comics #1 — National Allied Publications. Released only in New York City newsstands, Double Action Comics was most likely an “ashcan”, a limited-run publication produced simply to register the title. It had a black-and-white cover,[2] with the contents pulled from Action Comics #2.[3]
  • Feature Comics #26 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #49 - National Periodical Publications
  • Smash Comics #4 - Quality Comics

December[edit]

  • Ace Comics #33 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #19 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #45 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #9 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #8 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #16 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #34 - National Allied Publications
  • Double Action Comics (1939 series) #1 - National Periodical Publications (ashcan copy, distributed only in New York City newsstands)
  • Feature Comics #27 - Quality Comics
  • Marvel Mystery Comics (previously Marvel Comics) #2 - Timely Comics
  • More Fun Comics #50- National Periodical Publications
  • Smash Comics #5 - Quality Comics
  • Superman #3, cover dated Winter - National Periodical Publications

Specials[edit]


First issues by title[edit]

Renamed titles[edit]

Initial appearances by character name[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wallace, Daniel; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1930s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. Superman's runaway popularity as part of Action Comics earned him his own comic. This was a real breakthrough for the time, as characters introduced in comic books had never before been so successful as to warrant their own titles. 
  2. ^ One copy with a color cover has been proven to be a hoax.
  3. ^ The first mention of Double Action Comics #1 is in The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide #10 (Robert M. Overstreet, 1980). Additional information regarding Double Action can be found on page A-19 of the market report, which notes that, “four more copies of Double Action turned up and sold for record prices. All of these copies were in excellent condition with white cover and pages. Even a No. 1 was included in the four, the rest being No. 2’s.” The existence of a Very Good copy has been confirmed by both Robert Overstreet and John K. Snyder III.
  4. ^ Wallace "1930s" in Dolan, p. 24: "DC's second superstar debuted in the lead story of this issue, written by Bill Finger and drawn by Bob Kane, though the character was missing many of the elements that would make him a legend."