1946 Cleveland Indians season

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1946 Cleveland Indians
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Alva Bradley, Bill Veeck
Manager(s) Lou Boudreau
Local radio WGAR (AM) · WHK · WJW · WTAM
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In 1946, Bill Veeck finally became the owner of a major league team, the Cleveland Indians. He immediately put the team's games on radio, and set about to put his own indelible stamp on the franchise. Actor Bob Hope also acquired a minority share of the Indians.[1]

Offseason[edit]

  • Prior to 1946 season: Al Aber was signed as an amateur free agent by the Indians.[2]

Regular season[edit]

During the season, Bob Feller became the last pitcher to win at least 25 games in one season for the Indians in the 20th century.[3]

Season standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB
Boston Red Sox 104 50 .675 --
Detroit Tigers 92 62 .597 12
New York Yankees 87 67 .565 17
Washington Senators 76 78 .494 28
Chicago White Sox 74 80 .481 30
Cleveland Indians 68 86 .442 36
St. Louis Browns 66 88 .429 38
Philadelphia Athletics 49 105 .318 55

Notable transactions[edit]

Roster[edit]

1946 Cleveland Indians
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Rocco, MickeyMickey Rocco 34 98 24 .245 2 14

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Feller, BobBob Feller 48 371.1 26 15 2.18 348

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Berry, JoeJoe Berry 21 3 6 1 3.38 16

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Bob Feller, Led American League with 36 complete games (it would also be the highest total in the decade)[6]

All-Star Game

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Baltimore Orioles International League Alphonse "Tommy" Thomas
AA Oklahoma City Indians Texas League Roy Schalk
A Wilkes-Barre Barons Eastern League Dick Porter
B Harrisburg Senators Interstate League Les Bell
C Bakersfield Indians California League Martin Metrovich and Tony Governor
C Pittsfield Electrics Canadian-American League Tony Rensa
C Clovis Pioneers West Texas-New Mexico League Harold Webb
D Centreville Orioles Eastern Shore League Jim McLeod
D Dayton Indians Ohio State League Frank Parenti and Ival Goodman
D Batavia Clippers PONY League Jack Tighe
D Appleton Papermakers Wisconsin State League Ray Powell

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Harrisburg, Centreville, Batavia[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cleveland.com/homegrown/index.ssf?/homegrown/more/hope/allroads.html
  2. ^ Al Aber page at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p. 99, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  4. ^ Mickey Rocco page at Baseball-Reference
  5. ^ Frankie Hayes page at Baseball-Reference
  6. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.105, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, NY, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  7. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, N.C.: Baseball America, 2007

References[edit]