1968 Summer Paralympics medal table

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The 1968 Summer Paralympics was an international multi-sport event held in Tel Aviv, Israel, from November 4 to 13, 1968, in which athletes with physical disabilities competed against one another.[1][2] The Paralympics are run in parallel with the Olympic Games; these Games were originally planned to be held alongside the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, but two years prior to the event the Mexican government pulled out due to technical difficulties.[3] At the time, the event was known as the 17th International Stoke Mandeville Games.[4][5] The Stoke Mandeville Games were a forerunner to the Paralympics first organized by Sir Ludwig Guttmann in 1948.[2] This medal table ranks the competing National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) by the number of gold medals won by their athletes.

A total of 576 medals were awarded in 10 sports. Athletes from 22 of the 28 competing NPCs won at least one medal with the United States taking both the most gold, with 33, and most in total, with 99.[6] Host nation Israel won 62 medals at the Games, 18 gold, 21 silver and 23 bronze. Zipora Rubin-Rosenbaum won gold medals in the club throw, javelin, shot put and pentathlon and a silver medal in the discus for the host nation.[7] South Africa, who were banned from the Olympic Games because of the policy of apartheid, were invited to the Paralympics and won a total of 26 medals.[6][8]

Italian athlete Roberto Marson, who had previously won two gold medals in athletics at the 1964 Summer Paralympics in Tokyo, was proclaimed the outstanding athlete of the Games. He won ten gold medals, three in athletics field events, three in swimming and four in wheelchair fencing.[3] Ed Owen of the United States won medals in three different sports; four golds and a bronze in athletics, two golds in swimming and a silver in wheelchair basketball.[3][9]

Medal table[edit]

The ranking in this table is based on information provided by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and is consistent with IPC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by a National Paralympic Committee). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by IPC country code.

Two bronze medals were awarded in each dartchery, snooker, table tennis and lawn bowls event.[10][11][12][13] Some swimming events did not award silver or bronze medals.[14]

   *   Host nation

  • To sort this table by nation, total medal count, or any other column, click on the icon next to the column title.
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 United States a33 a27 a39 a99
2 Great Britain b29 c20 c20 b69
3 Israel* c18 b21 b23 c62
4 Australia d15 d16 j7 e38
5 France e13 f10 h9 g32
6 West Germany f12 e12 e11 f35
7 Italy g12 g10 d17 d39
8 Netherlands h12 n4 p4 j20
9 Argentina i10 h10 f10 h30
10 South Africa j9 i10 k7 i26
11 Rhodesia k6 j7 l7 k20
12 Canada l6 l6 m7 l19
13 Norway m5 p3 s1 p9
14 Jamaica n3 v1 t1 t5
15 Austria o2 k7 g10 m19
16 Japan p2 s2 i8 n12
17 Sweden q1 m6 q4 o11
18 New Zealand r1 t2 u1 u4
19 Ireland s0 o4 o5 q9
20 Belgium t0 q3 r3 s6
21 Spain u0 r3 v1 v4
22 Switzerland v0 u2 n6 r8
Total 189 186 201 576

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Specific
  1. ^ "Paralympic Games History – Summer". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 15 May 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Tel Aviv 1968". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Summer Games Governance 1960 to 1992". International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "Irish Set Issued". Reading Eagle. 17 November 1968. p. 93. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Medal Standings Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Zipora 's profile on paralympic.org
  8. ^ "The Netherlands against Apartheid – 1970s". International Institute of Social History. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  9. ^ ed owen's profile on paralympic.org
  10. ^ "Medallists Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games Dartchery". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. 
  11. ^ "Medallists Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games Snooker". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. 
  12. ^ "Medallists Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games Table Tennis". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. 
  13. ^ "Medallists Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games Lawn Bowls". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011. 
  14. ^ "Medallists Tel Aviv 1968 Paralympic Games Swimming". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 12 May 2011.