2002 ICC Champions Trophy

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2002 ICC Champions Trophy
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round-robin
Host(s)  Sri Lanka
Champions  India (1st title)
 Sri Lanka (1st title)
Participants 12
Most runs India Virender Sehwag (271)
Most wickets Sri Lanka Muttiah Muralitharan (10)
2000
2004

The 2002 ICC Champions Trophy was a cricket tournament that was held in Sri Lanka in 2002. It was the third edition of the ICC Champions Trophy – the first two having been known as the ICC Knock Out Tournaments. The tournament was due to be held in India, but was switched to Sri Lanka when an exemption from tax in India was not granted. Fifteen matches were to be played in the tournament including two semi-finals and a final match.[1] All the matches were played in Colombo at two grounds: R. Premadasa Stadium and Sinhalese Sports Club Ground. It was the first time that the teams of all International Cricket Council (ICC) member nations visited Sri Lanka to participate in a cricket tournament.[1]

Twelve teams competed: the 10 Test-playing nations plus Kenya who has full One Day International (ODI) status and the 2001 ICC Trophy winners the Netherlands. The teams were split into four pools of three teams each. Each team played the other two teams in its pool once, and the four teams that lead in each pool proceeded to the Semi Finals.[2][3] Australia lost to Sri Lanka in the first semi-final whereas India defeated South Africa in the second semi final. The Final between India and Sri Lanka was washed out twice, to leave no result.[4] Virender Sehwag was the highest run-scorer of the tournament and Muttiah Muralitharan was the highest wicket-taker.

Prize Money[edit]

The total prize money for the 2002 ICC Champions Trophy was $1.15 million, and in addition, the 12 teams also received an amount of $165,000 each for taking part in the tournament. The winning team of the tournament collected an amount of $525,000 that was comprised by: $100,00 for winning both of its Pool matches, $125,000 for winning semi-final and $300,000 for winning the final.[5]

Tournament structure[edit]

The 12 teams—10 Test playing nations plus Kenya and Netherlands)—were divided into four pools of three teams each, with every team playing two matches. Australia, Bangladesh and New Zealand were placed in Pool 1 whereas England, India and Zimbabwe were allotted Pool 2. Kenya, South Africa and West Indies were put together in Pool 3, and Netherlands, Pakistan and Sri Lanka played each other in Pool 4. The semi finals were played between the winners of Pool 2 and the winners of Pool 3, and Pool 1 and Pool 4.[1]

Participating teams[edit]

Pool 1 Pool 2 Pool 3 Pool 4
 Australia  England  Kenya  Netherlands
 Bangladesh  India  South Africa  Pakistan
 New Zealand  Zimbabwe  West Indies  Sri Lanka
Source[6]

Points Table[edit]

Australia, India, South Africa and Sri Lanka topped their respective Pools by winning their Pool matches, and qualified into the semi-finals.[7] Australia faced Sri Lanka in the first semi-final while in the second semi-final India played South Africa.

Points per win: 4[8]

Pool 1 Played Won Lost NR Tied Points NRR For Against
 Australia 2 2 0 0 0 8 +3.461 429/70.4 261/100
 New Zealand 2 1 1 0 0 4 +0.030 376/100 373/100
 Bangladesh 2 0 2 0 0 0 −3.275 206/100 377/70.4
Pool 2 Played Won Lost NR Tied Points NRR For Against
 India 2 2 0 0 0 8 +0.816 559/89.3 543/100
 England 2 1 1 0 0 4 +0.401 567/100 461/87.3
 Zimbabwe 2 0 2 0 0 0 −1.125 464/98 586/100
Pool 3 Played Won Lost NR Tied Points NRR For Against
 South Africa 2 2 0 0 0 8 +1.856 558/99 378/100
 West Indies 2 1 1 0 0 4 +0.202 499/100 474/99
 Kenya 2 0 2 0 0 0 −2.050 372/100 577/100
Pool 4 Played Won Lost NR Tied Points NRR For Against
 Sri Lanka 2 2 0 0 0 8 +2.861 493/86.1 286/100
 Pakistan 2 1 1 0 0 4 +1.245 342/66.2 337/86.1
 Netherlands 2 0 2 0 0 0 −4.323 222/100 434/66.2

Pool Matches[edit]

The first match of the tournament was played between Sri Lanka and Pakistan on 12 September 2002. Sri Lanka won the match by eight wickets with Sanath Jayasuriya scoring his thirteenth ODI century. He reached 8,000 runs in ODI during his innings.[9] Sri Lanka reached into the semi-finals by winning their next match against the Netherlands by 202 runs.[10] Australia, from the Pool 1, qualified for the semi-finals after defeating Bangladesh by nine wickets at the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground, Colombo. In their first Pool match, Australia had defeated New Zealand by 164 runs. They played Sri Lanka in the second semi-final of the tournament.[11]

South Africa, who had defeated the West Indies in their opening match, made their place into the semi-finals from Pool 3 by winning over Kenya.[12] They defeated Kenya by 176 runs with man of the match Herschelle Gibbs scoring 116 runs.[13] The fourth semi-finalist of the tournament was India, who defeated Zimbabwe and England in the Pool matches. Virender Sehwag scored 126 runs against England. India faced South Africa in the first semi-final of the tournament.[14]

12 September 2002
[1]
Pakistan 
200 (49.4 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
201/2 (36.1 overs)
Saeed Anwar 52 (82)
Muttiah Muralitharan 3/29 (10 overs)
Sanath Jayasuriya 102* (120)
Wasim Akram 1/42 (8 overs)
 Sri Lanka won by 8 wickets
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Daryl Harper
Player of the match: Sanath Jayasuriya
13 September 2002
[2]
West Indies 
238/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
242/8 (49 overs)
Chris Gayle 49 (55)
Jacques Kallis 2/41 (9 overs)
Jonty Rhodes 61 (70)
Mervyn Dillon 4/60 (10 overs)
14 September 2002
[3]
India 
288/6 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
274/8 (50 overs)
Mohammad Kaif 111 (112)
Douglas Hondo 4/62 (9 overs)
Andy Flower 145 (164)
Zaheer Khan 4/45 (10 overs)
 India won by 14 runs
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Asoka de Silva and Rudi Koertzen
Player of the match: Mohammad Kaif
15 September 2002
[4]
Australia 
296/7 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
132 (26.2 overs)
Damien Martyn 73 (87)
Jacob Oram 2/60 (10 overs)
Shane Bond 26 (22)
Glenn McGrath 5/37 (7 overs)
16 September 2002
[5]
Sri Lanka 
292/6 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
86 (29.3 overs)
Marvan Atapattu 101 (118)
Adeel Raja 2/50 (10 overs)
Tim de Leede 31 (43)
Muttiah Muralitharan 4/15 (5.3 overs)
 Sri Lanka won by 206 runs
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Dave Orchard and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Marvan Atapattu
17 September 2002
[6]
West Indies 
261/6 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
232 (49.1 overs)
Brian Lara 111 (120)
Steve Tikolo 2/49 (7 overs)
Steve Tikolo 93 (91)
Pedro Collins 3/18 (9.1 overs)
18 September 2002
[7]
England 
298/8 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
190/9 (48 overs)
Marcus Trescothick 119 (102)
Douglas Hondo 4/45 (6 overs)
Heath Streak 50* (58)
Ronnie Irani 4/37 (10 overs)
 England won by 108 runs
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Rudi Koertzen
Player of the match: Marcus Trescothick
  • Zimbabwe were fined 2 overs for a slow over rate
19 September 2002
[8]
Bangladesh 
129 (45.2 overs)
v
 Australia
133/1 (20.4 overs)
Alok Kapali 45 (75)
Jason Gillespie 3/20 (10 overs)
Matthew Hayden 67* (70)
Mohammad Rafique 1/32 (5 overs)
20 September 2002
[9]
South Africa 
316/5 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
140 (46.5 overs)
Herschelle Gibbs 116 (126)
Collins Obuya 2/77 (10 overs)
Steve Tikolo 69 (97)
Dale Benkenstein 3/5 (3.5 overs)
21 September 2002
[10]
Netherlands 
136 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
142/1 (16.2 overs)
Roland Lefebvre 32 (70)
Shahid Afridi 3/18 (10 overs)
Imran Nazir 59 (40)
Feiko Kloppenburg 1/23 (2 overs)
 Pakistan won by 9 wickets
Sinhalese Sports Club Ground, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Rudi Koertzen and Dave Orchard
Player of the match: Shahid Afridi
22 September 2002
[11]
England 
269/7 (50 overs)
v
 India
271/2 (39.3 overs)
Ian Blackwell 82 (68)
Ashish Nehra 2/49 (10 overs)
Virender Sehwag 126 (104)
Ian Blackwell 1/46 (8 overs)
 India won by 8 wickets
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Russell Tiffin
Player of the match: Virender Sehwag
23 September 2002
[12]
New Zealand 
244/9 (50 overs)
v
 Bangladesh
77 (19.3 overs)
Mathew Sinclair 70 (122)
Mohammad Ashraful 3/26 (5 overs)
Tushar Imran 20 (16)
Shane Bond 4/21 (5 overs)

Knockout Matches[edit]

Semifinals[edit]

The first semi-final was played between India and South Africa on 25 September 2002 at the R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo. India batted first and scored 261 runs for nine wickets in 50 overs. Yuvraj Singh, Virender Sehwag and Rahul Dravid scored 62, 59 and 49 runs respectively. South African fast bowler Shaun Pollock took three wickets for 43 runs. Chasing the target of 262, South Africa collapsed after reaching 192 runs for one wicket with Herschelle Gibbs scoring 116 and Jacques Kallis 97 runs in 37 overs. Gibbs could not continue his inning due to heat exhaustion.[15] Sehwag got three wickets for 25 runs, and was given the man of the match award for his performance. India won the match by 10 runs and qualified for the final of the tournament.[16][17]

The second semi-final was played between Sri Lanka and Australia on 27 September 2002 at the same ground. Australia batted first and scored 162 runs all out. Tail-ender Shane Warne scored 36 runs followed by Adam Gilchrist and Damien Martyn scoring 31 and 28 runs respectively. Sri Lankan off-spinner Muttiah Muralitharan took three wickets for 26 runs. Aravinda de Silva, who was awarded Man of the Match, conceded only 16 runs in 10 overs and took Matthew Hayden's wicket. Sri Lanka, in their innings, reached the target of 163 runs in 40 overs losing only three wickets. Opener Marvan Atapattu scored 51 runs followed by wicketkeeper-batsman Kumar Sangakkara and Sanath Jayasuriya scoring 48 and 42 runs respectively. Glenn McGrath took two wickets for 41 runs in 10 overs.[18][19]

25 September 2002
[13]
India 
261/9 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
251/6 (50 overs)
Yuvraj Singh 62 (72)
Shaun Pollock 3/43 (9 overs)
Herschelle Gibbs 116 (119)
Virender Sehwag 3/25 (5 overs)
 India won by 10 runs
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: David Shepherd and Russell Tiffin
Player of the match: Virender Sehwag
27 September 2002
[14]
Australia 
162 (48.4 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
163/3 (40 overs)
Shane Warne 36 (69)
Muttiah Muralitharan 3/26 (9.4 overs)
Marvan Atapattu 51 (113)
Glenn McGrath 2/41 (10 overs)
 Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Dave Orchard
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva

Final[edit]

The 2002 ICC Champions Trophy Final was played on 29 and 30 September 2002 at the R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo.[4] On 29 September, Sri Lanka scored 244 runs including Jayasuriya and Kumar Sangakkara scoring fifties, and Indian off-spinner Harbhajan Singh took three wickets for 27 in 10 overs. In reply, India started their batting and scored 14 runs without any loss in two overs before the match was abandoned due to heavy rain; the match was finished in no result.[20] It was decided that the new match would be played on the reserve day.[21]

On the reserve day the Sri Lankans again batted first, scoring 222 runs including Mahela Jayawardene and Russel Arnold scoring 77 and 56 runs respectively, and Indian Zaheer Khan took three wickets for 44 runs. India scored 38 runs in 8.4 overs and the match was abandoned due to rain without result.[22] According to ICC rules, an ODI match is only official after 25 overs bowled to the side batting second.[23]

29 & 30 September 2002
[15] & [16]
v
No result. India and Sri Lanka are declared as co-champions
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
  • Match rained out twice. India and Sri Lanka declared co-champions.
Semi-finals Final
25 September 2002

R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka

   India 261/9  
   South Africa 251/6  
 
29 & 30 September 2002

R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka

      India Declared co-champs
    Sri Lanka Declared co-champs
27 September 2002

R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka

   Australia 162
  Sri Lanka 163/3  

Criticism[edit]

The International Cricket Council's (ICC) rule for One Day International (ODI) cricket at that time, "a minimum of 25 overs have to be bowled to the side batting second to constitute a match", was criticized by former Indian cricketers.[24] Former Indian wicket-keeper Farokh Engineer rejected the rule saying that it "doesn't make any sense".[25] Another former Test cricketer Sanjay Manjrekar said that the ICC "should look at that rule straight away and change it", and the "obvious thing is to continue from where they left off".[25]

Tournament statistics[edit]

Indian opener Virender Sehwag was the highest run-scorer of the tournament. He scored 271 runs from five innings at the average of over 90, including a century and a fifty. His highest score was 126 runs against England.[26] Followed by Sri Lankan captain Sanath Jayasuriya who scored 254 runs. Herschelle Gibbs of South Africa scored two centuries in the tournament. He also had the highest average of 120 from three innings.[26] Zimbabwean Andy Flower's score of 145 against India was the highest individual score in a match.[26][27]

Sri Lankan off-spinner Muttiah Muralitharan was the most successful bowler of the tournament. He took ten wickets in three innings, while his best bowling figures were four wickets for 15 runs against the Netherlands at the R. Premadasa Stadium. The only five-wicket haul of the tournament was taken by Australian fast bowler Glen McGrath. He took five wickets for 37 runs against New Zealand at the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground.[28][29]

Zimbabwean Alistair Campbell took five catches in two matches,[30] and Sri Lankan wicketkeeper Kumar Sangakkara had the most number of dismissals with seven—five catches and two stumpings.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c BCCSL (19 March 2002). "Sri Lanka to Host ICC Champions Trophy in September 2002". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  2. ^ BCCSL (29 March 2002). "ICC Champions Trophy Match Schedule". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Austin, Charlie (1 June 2002). "ICC Champions Trophy: Blazing sunshine, blistering cricket". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Austin, Charlie (30 September 2002). "India and Sri Lanka share the spoils". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  5. ^ ICC Media Release (28 September 2002). "$300,000 of prize for ICC Champions Trophy winners". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "2002 ICC Champions Trophy, Sri Lanka – Pools". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  7. ^ "2002 ICC Champions Trophy, Sri Lanka – Statistics". BBC News. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  8. ^ "2002 ICC Champions Trophy, Sri Lanka – Points Table". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  9. ^ "Wisden –ICC Champions Trophy, pool 4:Sri Lanka v Pakistan". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  10. ^ Austin, Charlie (16 September 2002). "Sri Lanka breeze into ICC Champions Trophy semi-final". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  11. ^ Santhosh, S (19 September 2002). "Australia book place in semi-finals crushing Bangladesh". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  12. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy – 2nd match, Pool 3:South Africa v West Indies". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  13. ^ Vasu, Anand (20 September 2002). "South Africa on song by the light of the silvery moon". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  14. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03: Results". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  15. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy 2002: Rain ruins the final". BBC Sport. 30 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  16. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy India v South Africa: 1st Semi-final". BBC Sport. 25 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  17. ^ "SA hand victory to India". BBC Sport. 25 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  18. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy Australia v Sri Lanka: 2nd Semi-final". BBC Sport. 25 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  19. ^ "Sri Lanka humble Aussies". BBC Sport. 27 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  20. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03 (29 September) – Final: Sri Lanka v India". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  21. ^ "Sunday final washed out". BBC News. 29 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  22. ^ "Here comes the rain again". BBC News. 30 September 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  23. ^ "Here comes the rain again". BBC Sport. 1 October 2002. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  24. ^ "Here comes the rain again". BBC Sport. 1 October 2002. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  25. ^ a b "Trophy rules 'should change'". BBC Sport. 1 October 2002. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  26. ^ a b c "Records / ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03 / Most runs". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  27. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy – 3rd match, Pool 2: India vs Zimbabwe". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  28. ^ "Records / ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03 / Most wickets". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  29. ^ "ICC Champions Trophy – 4th match, Pool 1: Australia vs New Aealand". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  30. ^ "Records / ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03 / Most catches". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 
  31. ^ "Records / ICC Champions Trophy, 2002/03 / Most dismissals". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 January 2015. 

External links[edit]