2006 ICC Champions Trophy

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2006 ICC Champions Trophy
ICC Champions Trophy 2006 logo.svg
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round-robin
Host(s)  India
Champions  Australia (1st title)
Participants 8
Man of the Series (WI) CH Gayle
Most runs (WI) CH Gayle (474)
Most wickets (WI) JE Taylor (13)
2004
2009

The 2006 ICC Champions Trophy was a One Day International cricket tournament held in India from 7 October to 5 November 2006. It was the fifth edition of the ICC Champions Trophy (previously known as the ICC Knock-out). The tournament venue was not confirmed until mid-2005 when the Indian government agreed that tournament revenues would be free from tax (the 2002 tournament had been due to be held in India, but was switched to Sri Lanka when an exemption from tax in India was not granted).[1] Australia won the tournament, their first Champions Trophy victory. They were the only team to only get one loss in the tournament, as all other teams lost at least two matches. West Indies, their final opponents, beat Australia in the group stage, but were bowled out for 138 in the final and lost by eight wickets on the Duckworth–Lewis method. West Indies opening batsman Chris Gayle was named Player of the Tournament.

English writer Tim de Lisle said the tournament "had been fun", because "it had been unpredictable."[2] The unpredictability was in part shown by the fact that no Asian side qualified for the semi-final, for the first time in a major ICC tournament since the 1975 World Cup. De Lisle also claimed that "the pitches" had been the "tournament's secret", saying that they were "sporting and quixotic" and "quite untypical of both one-day cricket and the subcontinent." His viewed were echoed by panelists in a roundtable discussion organised by Cricinfo, "who hoped that the tournament would not be a one-off in a batsman-dominated game" according to news site rediff.com.[3] The tournament recorded five of the 10 lowest team totals in the tournament's history, and totals of 80 (for West Indies v Sri Lanka) and 89 (for Pakistan v South Africa) were the lowest recorded in matches involving the top eight ranked One-day International sides of the world.[4]

Qualifying[edit]

Ten teams competed in the tournament, and were seeded according to the ICC ODI Championship standings on 1 April 2006. Bangladesh became the last team to qualify, claiming tenth place ahead of Kenya on 23 March 2006. The first six teams on the ICC ODI table (Australia, South Africa, Pakistan, New Zealand, India, and England) qualified automatically; the next four teams (Sri Lanka, the defending champions West Indies, Zimbabwe and Bangladesh) played a pre-tournament round-robin qualifying round from 7 to 14 October to determine which two will proceed to play in the tournament proper.[5]

Tournament structure[edit]

2006 ICC Champions Trophy is located in India
Sawai Mansingh (Jaipur)
Brabourne (Mumbai)
Brabourne (Mumbai)
Sardar Patel (Ahmedabad)
Sardar Patel (Ahmedabad)
PCA (Mohali)
PCA (Mohali)
Cricket grounds hosting the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy

Two teams from the qualifying round, plus the other six teams, played in a group stage, split into two groups of four in a round-robin competition, played from 15 to 29 October. Matches in the preliminary round and the group round were played in the Punjab Cricket Association Stadium in Mohali, Sardar Patel Stadium in Ahmedabad, the Sawai Man Singh Stadium in Jaipur, and the Brabourne Stadium in Mumbai. The matches in Mumbai were the first ODIs at Brabourne Stadium for 11 years.

The top two teams from each group qualified for the semi-finals, played in Mohali on 1 November and in Jaipur on 2 November. The final was played in Mumbai on 5 November.

Participating teams[edit]

The 10 Test-playing nations had taken part.

Off the field issues[edit]

The BCCI, Indian cricket's governing body, were making efforts to ensure that this is the last ICC Champions Trophy. They stated that it was a "financial burden" for host nations, and that the ICC should host only one international tournament, the World Cup.[6] However, in April, BCCI president Sharad Pawar said that he would "respect the decision" if the ICC unanimously agreed to keep the Champions Trophy on the calendar.[7]

After the bombings in Mumbai in July 2006, there were concerns raised about the security of players, but no team decided to withdraw on these grounds.[8]

Herschelle Gibbs returned to India for the first time in six years; he had refused to tour the country following the match-fixing scandal on the tour of India in 2000, over fears he might be arrested. He eventually agreed to a questioning session with the Delhi police, incriminating several more people in the scandal.[9]

Pakistan's team composition frequently changed; the original captain Inzamam-ul-Haq was suspended following his decision to forfeit the fourth Test of Pakistan's match against England over an umpiring decision. Younis Khan was instated as captain, withdrew himself, then was appointed for the job again. On 16 October, the day before their first match, Pakistan fast bowlers Mohammad Asif and Shoaib Akhtar were sent home following a positive A sample of a drugs test.

Award ceremony controversy[edit]

During the Award ceremony after the finals, Ricky Ponting tapped the shoulders of BCCI President Sharad Pawar and gestured him to handover the trophy. Soon after the trophy was handed over, Damien Martyn nudged Sharad Pawar off the stage eager to relish the moment and to pose for the waiting photographers. Former Indian batsman Sunil Gavaskar who was also present in the stage, later disclosed that one of the Australian team members referred to Pawar as "Hiya Buddy".[10]

Although Pawar tried to play down the incident by stating that "it wasn't intentional", some cricketers including the usually diplomatic Sachin Tendulkar and Nikhil Chopra reacted strongly to this. In Mumbai, a section of NCP workers took to the streets demanding an apology from the Australian cricket team. Chaggan Bhujbal, a NCP leader said "This is an insult to a senior leader. We will make a formal complaint to the Australian embassy."

The BCCI, however, decided not to officially complain to Cricket Australia.[11] However, the issue soon got resolved when Ricky Ponting tended his apology to Pawar.

Umpires and match referees[edit]

Three match referees and eight umpires were named for the tournament. Of the ten umpires on the ICC elite panel, neither Darrell Hair, who was not nominated due to security concerns, nor Billy Doctrove were employed for the tournament. Those were two umpires calling Pakistan for ball tampering in August. An ICC spokesman said, "this didn't mean Billy Doctrove is a bad umpire", and that there was "nothing sinister" about the decision.[12]

Match referees

Umpires

Matches[edit]

Qualifying round[edit]

West Indies and Sri Lanka had qualified with a game to spare, and their match only determined position on the ICC ODI Championship table as well as group opposition in the main stage.

Match Date Team 1 Team 2 Venue Result Man of the Match
ODI 2423 7 October 2006  Sri Lanka  Bangladesh Mohali  Sri Lanka won by 37 runs Upul Tharanga
ODI 2424 8 October 2006  West Indies  Zimbabwe Ahmedabad  West Indies won by 9 wickets Chris Gayle
ODI 2425 10 October 2006  Sri Lanka  Zimbabwe Ahmedabad  Sri Lanka won by 144 runs Upul Tharanga
ODI 2426 11 October 2006  West Indies  Bangladesh Jaipur  West Indies won by 10 wickets Chris Gayle
ODI 2427 13 October 2006  Bangladesh  Zimbabwe Jaipur  Bangladesh won by 101 runs Shahriar Nafees
ODI 2428 14 October 2006  Sri Lanka  West Indies Mumbai (BS)  Sri Lanka won by 9 Wickets Farveez Maharoof
Team Pld W L NR NRR Pts
 Sri Lanka 3 3 0 0 +2.67 6
 West Indies 3 2 1 0 +0.40 4
 Bangladesh 3 1 2 0 +0.02 2
 Zimbabwe 3 0 3 0 −2.93 0

Main round[edit]

Match Date Team 1 Team 2 Venue Result Man of the Match
Main Round
ODI 2429 15 October 2006  India  England Jaipur  India won by 4 Wickets Munaf Patel
ODI 2430 16 October 2006  New Zealand  South Africa Mumbai (BS)  New Zealand won by 87 runs Stephen Fleming
ODI 2431 17 October 2006  Pakistan  Sri Lanka Jaipur  Pakistan won by 4 wickets Abdul Razzaq
ODI 2432 18 October 2006  Australia  West Indies Mumbai (BS)  West Indies won by 10 runs Runako Morton
ODI 2433 20 October 2006  New Zealand  Sri Lanka Mumbai (BS)  Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets Muttiah Muralitharan
ODI 2434 21 October 2006  Australia  England Jaipur  Australia won by 6 wickets Damien Martyn
ODI 2435 24 October 2006  South Africa  Sri Lanka Ahmedabad  South Africa won by 78 runs Shaun Pollock
ODI 2436 25 October 2006  New Zealand  Pakistan Mohali  New Zealand won by 51 runs Stephen Fleming
ODI 2437 26 October 2006  India  West Indies Ahmedabad  West Indies won by 3 wickets Shivnarine Chanderpaul
ODI 2438 27 October 2006  Pakistan  South Africa Mohali  South Africa won by 124 runs Makhaya Ntini
ODI 2439 28 October 2006  England  West Indies Ahmedabad  England won by 3 wickets Chris Gayle
ODI 2440 29 October 2006  India  Australia Mohali  Australia won by 6 wickets Damien Martyn
Group A
Team Pld W L NR NRR Pts
 Australia 3 2 1 0 +0.53 4
 West Indies 3 2 1 0 +0.01 4
 India 3 1 2 0 +0.48 2
 England 3 1 2 0 −1.04 2
Group B
Team Pld W L NR NRR Pts
 South Africa 3 2 1 0 +0.77 4
 New Zealand 3 2 1 0 +0.57 4
 Pakistan 3 1 2 0 −0.20 2
 Sri Lanka 3 1 2 0 −1.11 2

Knock-out stage[edit]

Number Date Team 1 Team 2 Venue Result Man of the Match
Semi–Finals
ODI 2441 1 November 2006  Australia  New Zealand Mohali  Australia by 34 runs Glenn McGrath
ODI 2442 2 November 2006  South Africa  West Indies Jaipur  West Indies by 6 wickets Chris Gayle
Final
ODI 2443 5 November 2006  Australia  West Indies Mumbai (BS)  Australia by 8 wickets (D/L) Shane Watson
Semi-finals Final
1 November – Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali
   Australia 240/9  
   New Zealand 206/10  
 
5 November – Brabourne Stadium, Mumbai
       Australia 116/2
     West Indies 138/10
2 November – Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur
   South Africa 258/8
   West Indies 262/4  

Tournament statistics[edit]

Statistics include performances in preliminary round matches.

Batting[edit]

Most runs[13]
No Player Team Matches Inns NO Runs HS[14] Ave SR 100s 50s
1 Chris Gayle  West Indies 8 8 2 474 133* 79.00 92.94 3 0
2 Upul Tharanga  Sri Lanka 6 6 0 320 110 53.33 76.37 2 1
3 Damien Martyn  Australia 5 5 2 241 78 80.33 70.05 0 2
4 Shivnarine Chanderpaul  West Indies 7 7 3 222 57* 55.50 67.06 0 3
5 Mahela Jayawardene  Sri Lanka 6 6 1 188 48 37.60 80.68 0 0
6 Stephen Fleming  New Zealand 4 4 0 184 89 46.00 71.87 1 0
7 Shahriar Nafees  Bangladesh 3 3 1 166 123* 83.00 66.13 1 0
8 Dwayne Bravo  West Indies 8 5 1 164 112* 41.00 75.22 1 0
9 Kumar Sangakkara  Sri Lanka 6 5 1 160 80 40.00 81.21 0 1
10 Sanath Jayasuriya  Sri Lanka 6 6 1 156 48 31.20 91.76 0 0
Highest scores[15]
No Player Team Runs Opposition Stadium Date
1 Chris Gayle  West Indies 133*  South Africa Sawai Mansingh Stadium 2 November
2 Shahriar Nafees  Bangladesh 123*  Zimbabwe Sawai Mansingh Stadium 13 October
3 Dwayne Bravo  West Indies 112*  England Sardar Patel Stadium 28 October
4 Upul Tharanga  Sri Lanka 110  Zimbabwe Sardar Patel Stadium 10 October
5 Upul Tharanga  Sri Lanka 105  Bangladesh Punjab Cricket Association Stadium 7 October
6 Chris Gayle  West Indies 104*  Bangladesh Sawai Mansingh Stadium 11 October
7 Chris Gayle  West Indies 101  England Sardar Patel Stadium 28 October
8 Adam Gilchrist  Australia 92  West Indies Brabourne Stadium 18 October
9 Runako Morton  West Indies 90*  Australia Brabourne Stadium 18 October
9 Kevin Pietersen  England 90*  West Indies Sardar Patel Stadium 28 October

Bowling[edit]

Most wickets[16]
No Player Team Matches Ovs Mdns Runs Wickets Ave SR Econ BBI 4s 5s
1 Jerome Taylor  West Indies 7 57 3 287 13 22.07 26.3 5.03 4–49 1 0
2 Farveez Maharoof  Sri Lanka 6 36 2 190 12 15.83 18.0 5.27 6–14 0 1
3 Lasith Malinga  Sri Lanka 6 50.3 3 210 11 19.09 27.5 4.15 4–53 1 0
4 Kyle Mills  New Zealand 4 28.3 2 118 10 11.80 17.1 4.14 4–38 1 0
4 Glenn McGrath  Australia 5 44 7 158 10 15.80 26.4 3.59 3–22 0 0
4 Nathan Bracken  Australia 5 41 4 194 10 19.40 24.6 4.73 3–22 0 0
7 Chaminda Vaas  Sri Lanka 5 46 8 170 9 18.88 30.6 3.69 2–6 0 0
7 Muttiah Muralitharan  Sri Lanka 6 55 3 181 9 20.11 36.6 3.29 4–23 1 0
9 Makhaya Ntini  South Africa 4 28 3 129 8 16.12 21.0 4.60 5–21 0 1
9 Shane Watson  Australia 5 34 0 136 8 17.00 25.5 4.00 3–16 0 0
9 Chris Gayle  West Indies 8 46.1 2 185 8 23.12 34.6 4.00 3–3 0 0
9 Ian Bradshaw  West Indies 6 51 2 192 8 24.00 38.2 3.76 3–30 0 0
Best bowling analysis[17]
No Player Team Analysis Opposition Stadium Date
1 Farveez Maharoof  Sri Lanka 6–14  West Indies Brabourne Stadium 14 October
2 Makhaya Ntini  South Africa 5–21  Pakistan Punjab Cricket Association Stadium 27 October
3 Muttiah Muralitharan  Sri Lanka 4–23  New Zealand Brabourne Stadium 20 October
4 Kyle Mills  New Zealand 4–38  Australia Punjab Cricket Association Stadium 1 November
5 Jerome Taylor  West Indies 4–49  Australia Brabourne Stadium 18 October
6 Abdul Razzaq  Pakistan 4–50  Sri Lanka Sawai Mansingh Stadium 17 October
7 Lasith Malinga  Sri Lanka 4–53  South Africa Sardar Patel Stadium 24 October
8 Chris Gayle  West Indies 3–3  Zimbabwe Sardar Patel Stadium 8 October
9 Jeetan Patel  New Zealand 3–11  South Africa Brabourne Stadium 16 October
10 Dwayne Bravo  West Indies 3–14  Bangladesh Sawai Mansingh Stadium 11 October

Records[edit]

Records broken during the tournament:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further references and notes[edit]

  1. ^ India to keep Champions Trophy BBC News, 26 May 2005
  2. ^ Why it has been fun this time, Tim de Lisle, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  3. ^ Indian batsmen's bad habits exposed, by Deepti Patwardhan, from Rediff. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  4. ^ Champions Trophy – Lowest Team Totals, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  5. ^ Bangladesh confirm final ICC Champions Trophy 2006 place ICC media release, 23 March 2006
  6. ^ India to call for scrapping of Champions Trophy Cricinfo, 4 January 2006
  7. ^ BCCI not against Champions Trophy – Pawar Cricinfo 27 April 2006
  8. ^ Concern over Champions Trophy Cricinfo, 12 July 2006
  9. ^ Gibbs reveals more names to Indian police Cricinfo, 12 October 2006
  10. ^ 'Hiya buddy', said Aussies to Pawar
  11. ^ BCCI won't officially complain to Cricket Australia
  12. ^ Doctrove will not stand
  13. ^ ICC Champions Trophy, 2006 Batting – Most Runs, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  14. ^ Highest score.
  15. ^ ICC Champions Trophy, 2006 Highest Individual Scores, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  16. ^ ICC Champions Trophy, 2006 Bowling – Most Wickets, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  17. ^ ICC Champions Trophy, 2006 Best Innings Bowling, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  18. ^ Champions Trophy – Most Consecutive Defeats, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  19. ^ Champions Trophy – Most Consecutive Wins, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  20. ^ Champions Trophy Centuries, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  21. ^ Champions Trophy – Most Runs in a Tournament, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  22. ^ Champions Trophy – Most Consecutive Ducks, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  23. ^ Champions Trophy – Youngest to Score Century, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  24. ^ a b c d Champions Trophy – Partnership Records, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006
  25. ^ Champions Trophy Best Innings Bowling, from Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 November 2006

External links[edit]