7th century in Ireland

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600s[edit]

601
602 or 604
  • Death of Áed mac Diarmato or Áed Sláine (Áed of Slane), the son of Diarmait mac Cerbaill. Legendary stories exist of Áed's birth. Killed his nephew and was in turn slain by his grandnephew.
603
605
607
608
609

610s[edit]

610
  • Death of Conall Laeg Breg mac Áedo Sláine,[2] a King of Brega from the Síl nÁedo Sláine branch of the southern Ui Neill. He was the son of the high king Áed Sláine mac Diarmato (died 602). He ruled from 602-610. He is not called King of Brega in the annals but is second in a poem on the rulers of Síl nÁedo Sláine in the Book of Leinster.[9]
611
  • Suibne Menn or Suibne mac Fiachnai (died 628) was an Irish king who is counted as a High King of Ireland and started his reign in 611.
612
  • Death of Áed Uaridnach, High King of Ireland until 607.
613
  • Death of Rónán mac Colmáin of the Uí Dúnlainge, son of Colmán Már mac Coirpri.[10] The Annals of Tigernach includes his death obit with the title King of Laigin, that is King of Leinster[11] These annals interpolated dates for some Leinster kings in this period from the king lists.
615
616
618

620s[edit]

620
621
622
623
  • Suibne Menn or Suibne mac Fiachnai (died 628) was an Irish king who is counted as a High King of Ireland and ended his reign in 623.
624
625
626
627
627 or 628
629

630s[edit]

630
632
632 or 633
633
634
  • Death of Áed Dammán, called a King of Iarmumu in his obituary. He was an uncle of Máel Dúin mac Áedo Bennán.[18]
635
636
  • Battle of Maigh Rath (Moira, County Down).
  • Battle of Áth Goan in the western Liffey plain for the kingship of Leinster involved Faílbe Flann mac Áedo Duib.
637
639

640s[edit]

640
641
642
  • Birth of Máel Ruba (Old Irish spelling), or Malruibhe (died 722), sometimes Latinised as Rufus, a monk, originally from Bangor, County Down, and founder of the monastic community of Applecross in Ross, one of the best attested early Christian monasteries in modern-day Scotland.
  • Death of Domnall mac Áedo, a High King of Ireland since 624 or 628.
643
  • Death of Dúnchad mac Fiachnai, who is mentioned as king of Ulaid at the time of his death.[22]
644
646
647
648
649

650s[edit]

650
652
653
654
  • Death of Flannesda, a son of Domnall mac Áedo (died 642), High King of Ireland.
655
  • Death of Laidgnen/Loingsech mac Colmáin, son of Colmán mac Cobthaig, king of Connacht from the Ui Fiachrach branch of the Connachta.[2]
656
657
658
  • Death of Blathmac, son of the first Uí Cheinnselaig king, Rónán mac Colmáin (died 625)[2]
659

660s[edit]

660
661
662
  • Conall and Colgu, two sons of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, were slain by Ceirrceann.[22]
662 or 663
664-666
664
  • May 3: an eclipse of the sun was visible from Ireland.
  • The Annals of the Four Masters [22] records the following deaths:
A great mortality prevailed in Ireland this year, which was called the Buidhe Connail, and the following number of the saints of Ireland died of it: St. Feichin, Abbot of Fobhar, on 14 February; St. Ronan, son of Bearach; St. Aileran the Wise; St. Cronan, son of Silne; St. Manchan, of Liath; St. Ultan Mac hUi Cunga, Abbot of Cluain Iraird Clonard; Colman Cas, Abbot of Cluain Mic Nois; and Cummine, Abbot of Cluain Mic Nois. After Diarmaid (Diarmait mac Áedo Sláine) and Blathmac (Blathmac mac Áedo Sláine), the two sons of Aedh Slaine, had been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they died of the same plague. There died also Maelbreasail, son of Maelduin, and Cu Gan Mathair (Cathal Cú-cen-máthair), King of Munster; Aenghus Uladh. There died very many ecclesiastics and laics in Ireland of this mortality besides these.
665
666
  • The Battle of Aine, between the Aradha and Ui Fidhgeinte, where Eoghan, son of Crunnmael, was slain.
  • The Battle of Fertas (Belfast) was fought between the Ulaid and the Cruithne and Cathussach mac Luirgéne, their king, was defeated and slain.
  • The Annals of the Four Masters[22] records the following deaths:
A great plague raged in this year, of which died four abbots at Beannchair Uladh Bangor, namely, Bearach, Cummine, Colum, and Aedhan, their names. Blathmac, son of Maelcobha, King of Ulidia, died.
  • Death of Cellach mac Guairi, a son of Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin, a king of Connacht
  • Death of Fáelán mac Colmáin,[2] a king of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the son of Colmán Már mac Coirpri, a previous king.[10]
  • Probable date of the death of Eochaid Iarlaithe,[6] a son of Fiachnae mac Báetáin.
667
668
  • Deaths of two of the three known sons of Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin; Artgal mac Guairi and Muirchertach Nár mac Guairi, a king of Connacht.
669

670s[edit]

670
671
672
  • Cenn Fáelad mac Blathmaic (died 675) followed his father Blathmac mac Áedo Sláine (died 665) and his brother Sechnassach (died 671) as High King of Ireland and king of Brega.
673
  • Cenn Fáelad mac Blathmaic ended his reign as High King.[29]
674
675
  • Death of Cenn Fáelad mac Blathmaic.[2]
676
677
  • At the Battle of Loch Gabor (Lagore, County Meath) the Laigin fought with the high king Fínsnechta Fledach. There was slaughter on both sides but Finsnechta emerged the victor.
678
679

680s[edit]

680
681
  • Death of Dúngal Eilni mac Scandail[13] a Dal nAraide king of the Cruithne. He came to the rule of these tribes some time after 668.[31] In 681 he and Cenn Fáelad mac Suibne, chief of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin were burned by Máel Dúin mac Máel Fithrich of the Cenél nEógan at Dún Ceithirn.
682
683
684
685
688
  • Fínsnechta Fledach abdicated as king of Brega and High King of Ireland to become a monk. He reclaimed the crowns the following year, 689 and abandoned monkishness.
  • At the Battle of Imlech Pich, Niall mac Cernaig Sotal (died 701),[2] a king in southern Brega of the Uí Chernaig sept of Lagore of the Síl nÁedo Sláine defeated Congalach mac Conaing Cuirre (died 696) of Uí Chonaing and his Ciannachta allies.[33]

690s[edit]

690
  • Death of Aillil mac Dúngail Eilni, a chief of the Dal nAraide and son of Dúngal Eilni mac Scandail (died 681)[13]
691
692
  • Death of Fergus mac Áedáin,[13] a king of Ulaid from 674. He was the first member of the Dal nAraide to hold the throne since death of Congal Cáech at Mag Roth in 639. He was of the Ui Echach Coba branch of the Dal nAraide and was the son of Áedán mac Mongain (died 616).[12]
693
  • Death of Bran Mut mac Conaill,[2] a King of Leinster from the Uí Dúnlainge branch of the Laigin. He was the grandson of Fáelán mac Colmáin (died 666), a previous king.[10] He ruled from 680 until his death.
694
695
  • Death of Fínsnechta Fledach mac Dúnchada,[2] High King of Ireland, who belonged to the southern Síl nÁedo Sláine sept of the Uí Néill and was King of Brega in modern County Meath.
696
697
698

700s[edit]

700
  • End of archaic Old Irish period (from c. AD 500)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland. Foster, RF. Oxford University Press, Oxford. 1989
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa all dates per The Chronology of the Irish Annals, Daniel P. McCarthy
  3. ^ a b Byrne, Francis John, Irish Kings and High-Kings. Batsford, London, 1973. ISBN 0-7134-5882-8. Table 10.
  4. ^ Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 237
  5. ^ Walsh A New Dictionary of Saints p. 127
  6. ^ a b c Byrne, p.111 and 287
  7. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of Saints, p.343
  8. ^ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08641a.htm Retrieved June 14, 2007
  9. ^ Book of Leinster, Flann Mainistrech: Síl Aeda Sláne Na Sleg"
  10. ^ a b c Byrne, Table 9.
  11. ^ Annals of Tigernach AT 613.4
  12. ^ a b Early Christian Ireland by T. M. Charles-Edwards
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h Date per Annals of Ulster
  14. ^ a b Illustrated Dictionary of Irish History. Mac Annaidh, S (ed). Gill and Macmillan, Dublin. 2001
  15. ^ Byrne, Table 12.
  16. ^ Byrne, Table 15.
  17. ^ The Book of Leinster gives him a reign of 10 years as King of Leinster and 20 years as King of Ui cennseleig
  18. ^ a b Annals of Innsifallen AI 633.1
  19. ^ The Book of Leinster and Laud Synchronisms give him a reign of 15 years
  20. ^ a b c Sharpe, Richard, Adomnán of Iona: Life of St. Columba, (London, 1995)
  21. ^ Byrne, Table 13.
  22. ^ a b c d e Annals of the Four Masters
  23. ^ a b c Byrne, Table 6.
  24. ^ Byrne, Table 3
  25. ^ the Book of Leinster gives him reign of 15 years and Laud Synchronisms give him a reign of 16 years
  26. ^ Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5
  27. ^ Bannerman, John, Studies in the History of Dalriada. Scottish Academic Press, Edinburgh, 1974. ISBN 0-7011-2040-1
  28. ^ Byrne
  29. ^ a b T.M. Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, Appendix II
  30. ^ Annals of Ulster AU 676.4
  31. ^ the last date in the Annals of Ulster in which a chief of the Cruithne is mentioned prior to Dungal
  32. ^ Bede. Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum.
  33. ^ Annals of Ulster, AU688.4; this contains a lament, attributed to one Gabairchenn, for the Ciannachta leaders killed in battle.
  34. ^ The Concise History of Ireland. Duffy, S. Gill & Macmillan, Dublin. 2005