911 Agamemnon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
911 Agamemnon
Discovery A
Discoverer K. Reinmuth
Discovery date March 19, 1919
Alternate
designations
1919 FD
Category Jupiter Trojan
Orbital elements C
Epoch January 14, 1990 (JDCT 2447905.5)
Eccentricity (e) 0.068
Semi-major axis (a) 5.214
Perihelion (q) 4.860
Aphelion (Q) 5.569
Orbital period (P) 11.907
Inclination (i) 21.833
Longitude of the
ascending node
(Ω)
338.002
Argument of
perihelion
(ω)
81.492
Mean anomaly (M) 110.147

911 Agamemnon is a large 167 kilometres (104 mi) trojan asteroid that orbits the Sun at the same distance as the planet Jupiter. It is located in the leading Lagrangian point L4. Based on IRAS data, Agamemnon is 167 kilometres (104 mi) in diameter and is probably the 2nd largest Jupiter Trojan.[1] Recent observations of the asteroid's occultations characterize its shape[2] and are suggestive of Agamemnon to have a satellite.[3]

It was discovered by Karl Wilhelm Reinmuth on March 19, 1919, in Heidelberg, Germany.[4] It is named after King Agamemnon, a main character of the Iliad.

JPL Small-Body Database list of the largest Jupiter Trojans based on IRAS data:
Trojan Diameter (km)
624 Hektor 225
911 Agamemnon 167
1437 Diomedes 164
1172 Äneas 143
617 Patroclus 141
588 Achilles 135
1173 Anchises 126
1143 Odysseus 126

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 1997 were used to build a light curve showing a rotation period of 6.5819 ± 0.0007 hours with a brightness variation of 0.29 ± 0.01 magnitude. A 2009 study yielded a period of 6.592 ± 0.004, in reasonable agreement with the previous result.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (TJN) and diameter > 50 (km)". JPL's Solar System Dynamics Group. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  2. ^ "Agamemnon profile predicted from distributedly observed occultations of the same star". IOTA (International Occultation Timing Association). Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  3. ^ "On 2012-01-19 (911) Agamemnon occults HIP 41337 (SAO 60804)". Steve Conard, Willow Oak Observatory. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  4. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 911 Agamemnon (1919 FD)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2012-02-10 last obs. 
  5. ^ Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; Hahn, Gerhard; Schober, Hans-Josef; Lahulla, Felix; Delbò, Marco; Lagerkvist, Claes-Ingvar (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal 141 (5): 170. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170.  edit

External links[edit]