Allen Loughry

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Allen H. Loughry II
Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia
In office
January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2024
Preceded by Thomas McHugh (judge)
Personal details
Born (1970-08-09)August 9, 1970
Randolph County, West Virginia

Allen H. Loughry II is a Justice on the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia.[1] He was previously best known for writing Don't Buy Another Vote, I Won't Pay for a Landslide.

Early life and education[edit]

Loughry was born in Elkins, West Virginia, and raised in Tucker County, West Virginia.[2] He graduated from Tucker County High School in 1988 and went on to earn an undergraduate degree from the Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism at West Virginia University.[3] Loughry earned a law degree from Capital University Law School in Columbus, Ohio, where he graduated with the honor of Order of the Curia. He also holds an S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science) from The American University, Washington College of Law; an LL.M. (Masters of Laws in Criminology and Criminal Justice) from the University of London; and an LL.M.(Masters of Laws in Law and Government) from The American University, Washington College of Law. He studied law in England at the University of Oxford and received the program's top political science award. The director of the Washington College of Law Program on Law and Government, Professor Jamin Raskin, said, "Allen was a model student and exacting scholar, and he will make a brilliant judge of the highest integrity."[4] On October 4, 2013, American University Washington College of Law awarded Loughry its Distinguished Alumnus Award. Raskin, also a Maryland State Senator, said, "Not only was Loughry a brilliant, popular, and diligent student at AUWCL, but his research done at AUWCL became a published and much-acclaimed analysis of the history of political corruption in West Virginia. Loughry's run for the West Virginia Supreme Court was a tribute to his extraordinary creativity and intellect, and we are very proud of him and all his accomplishments."[5]

Career[edit]

From 2003 until his election to the Supreme Court, Loughry served as a law clerk for the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. He worked for several Justices, lastly for Justice Margaret Workman. While at the Supreme Court he also was an adjunct professor in the University of Charleston's political science department. He previously served as a senior assistant attorney general in the West Virginia Attorney General's Office for seven years, in both the appellate and administration divisions. While there he was appointed as a special prosecuting attorney on numerous occasions to handle criminal cases throughout West Virginia.[6] He has argued a number of cases before the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia and has argued or filed legal pleadings in the Supreme Court of the United States, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, and the United States District Courts for the Southern and Northern Districts of West Virginia and the Southern District of Florida, among other legal forums. Loughry also served as a Special Assistant to U.S. Rep. Harley O. Staggers, Jr., and as a Direct Aide to West Virginia Governor Gaston Caperton.[6] In 1997, he completed a legal externship at the Supreme Court of Ohio.[7] He also served as a personal assistant to the Tucker County Prosecuting Attorney in 1988 and 1989. Additionally, he wrote for two newspapers (The Parsons Advocate and The Dominion Post of Morgantown) and was a freelance writer for The Associated Press. Loughry was the only candidate to participate in West Virginia's public financing pilot program,[8] which was open only to Supreme Court candidates in the 2012 campaign.[9]

Authorship[edit]

In 2006, Loughry published Don't Buy Another Vote, I Won't Pay for a Landslide: The Sordid and Continuing History of Political Corruption in West Virginia.[10] The publication was the result of ten years of research that began as his doctoral thesis at American University. It covers corruption in West Virginia from 1861, before statehood, through 2006 and includes topics such as John F. Kennedy's 1960 Primary Election, the Hatfields and McCoys, Mary Harris Jones, the Battle of Blair Mountain, gambling, sex scandals, and the author's road map to reform. Forewords were written by Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and former Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV).[11] It was the only foreword Sen. Byrd wrote for any book.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "www.courtswv.gov", Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia
  2. ^ http://www.herald-dispatch.com/opinions/x2102455102/Court-must-resist-the-influence-of-politics, "www.herald-dispatch.com"
  3. ^ Phil Kabler, "State Beat: Officers have fast and slow starts", "wvgazette.com"
  4. ^ "News and Events @ American University Washington College of Law Newsletter", "American University Washington College of Law", November 2010
  5. ^ "West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry to Receive Distinguished Alumnus Award at American University Washington College of Law", "American University Washington College of Law", September 23, 2013
  6. ^ a b Steven Allen Adams, "WVCOURT: Allen Loughry Talks About His Campaign for West Virginia Supreme Court", "West Virginia Watchdog.org", July 2011
  7. ^ Andrea Lannom, "Allen Loughry, Republican, Kanawha County", "The State Journal", May 2012
  8. ^ http://apps.sos.wv.gov/elections/candidate-search/readpdf.aspx?DocId=11972, "WV Secretary of State information"
  9. ^ "Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia Opinion Case No. 12-0899", September 2012
  10. ^ "Candidates Corner: Allen Loughry", "The Register Herald", October 2012
  11. ^ Dave Mistich "Two seats up for grabs in WV Supreme Court", "West Virginia Public Broadcasting", November 2012

Notes[edit]

Loughry, Allen. Don't Buy Another Vote, I Won't Pay for a Landslide: The Sordid and Continuing History of Political Corruption in West Virginia. Parsons, WV:McClain Printing Company, 2006.