Anna Karlin

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Anna R. Karlin is an American computer scientist, the Microsoft Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington.

Biography[edit]

Karlin was born on March 19, 1960, into an academic family: her father, Samuel Karlin, was a mathematician at Stanford University, and her brother Kenneth would become a professor of chemistry at Johns Hopkins University.[1][2]

Karlin went to Stanford for her undergraduate studies, receiving a bachelor's degree in 1981.[3] She stayed at Stanford for graduate school, and earned Ph.D. in 1987 under the supervision of Jeffrey Ullman.[4] She continued to work near Stanford, at the DEC Systems Research Center, for five years, before moving to the University of Washington in 1994.[3] She was program chair of the IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science in 1997.[3][5]

Karlin was also one of the founding members of the rock music band Severe Tire Damage,[6] and in 1993 as part of the band she participated in the first live music broadcast on the Internet.[7]

Research[edit]

Karlin's research interests are in the design and analysis of online algorithms and randomized algorithms, which she has applied to problems in algorithmic game theory, system software, distributed computing, and data mining.[5] She has written heavily cited papers on the use of randomized packet markings to perform IP traceback,[8] competitive analysis of multiprocessor cache coherence algorithms,[9] unified algorithms for simultaneously managing all levels of the memory hierarchy,[10] web proxy servers,[11] and hash tables with constant worst-case lookup time.[12]

Awards and honors[edit]

In 2012 Karlin was named as a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.[13]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Karlin, Anna R.; Manasse, Mark S.; Rudolph, Larry; Sleator, Daniel D. (1988), "Competitive snoopy caching", Algorithmica 3 (1): 79–119, doi:10.1007/BF01762111, MR 925479 .
  • Dietzfelbinger, Martin; Karlin, Anna; Mehlhorn, Kurt; Meyer auf der Heide, Friedhelm; Rohnert, Hans; Tarjan, Robert E. (1994), "Dynamic perfect hashing: upper and lower bounds", SIAM Journal on Computing 23 (4): 738–761, doi:10.1137/S0097539791194094, MR 1283572 .
  • Feeley, M. J.; Morgan, W. E.; Pighin, E. P.; Karlin, A. R.; Levy, H. M.; Thekkath, C. A. (1995), "Implementing global memory management in a workstation cluster", Proceedings of the 15th ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles (SOSP '95), pp. 201–212, doi:10.1145/224056.224072 .
  • Wolman, Alec; Voelker, M.; Sharma, Nitin; Cardwell, Neal; Karlin, Anna; Levy, Henry M. (1999), "On the scale and performance of cooperative Web proxy caching", Proceedings of the 17th ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles (SOSP '99), pp. 16–31, doi:10.1145/319151.319153 .
  • Savage, Stefan; Wetherall, David; Karlin, Anna; Anderson, Tom (2000), "Practical network support for IP traceback", Proceedings of the conference on Applications, Technologies, Architectures, and Protocols for Computer Communication (SIGCOMM '00), pp. 295–306, doi:10.1145/347059.347560 .
  • Savage, Stefan; Wetherall, David; Karlin, Anna; Anderson, Tom (2001), "Network support for IP traceback", IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking 9 (3): 226–237, doi:10.1109/90.929847 .

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sam Karlin, mathematician who improved DNA analysis, dead at 83, Stanford University, retrieved 2011-01-16.
  2. ^ Ambrose, Susan A. (1997). Journeys of women in science and engineering : no universal constants. Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press. p. 247. ISBN 1-56639-527-5. 
  3. ^ a b c Curriculum vitae, retrieved 2012-02-23.
  4. ^ Anna R. Karlin at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  5. ^ a b Speaker biography for Grace Hopper Lecture Series, University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science, retrieved 2012-02-23.
  6. ^ Severe Tire Damage: The Band, retrieved 2012-02-23.
  7. ^ Severe Tire Damage plays the first live music performance on the internet, retrieved 2012-02-23.
  8. ^ Savage, Wetherall, and Karlin et al. (2000, 2001)
  9. ^ Karlin et al. (1988).
  10. ^ Feeley et al. (1995).
  11. ^ Wolman et al. (1999).
  12. ^ Dietzfelbinger et al. (1994).
  13. ^ ACM Fellows Named for Computing Innovations that Advance Technologies in Information Age, ACM, December 11, 2012.