Browning, Montana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Browning, Montana
Town
Town of Browning
Downtown Browning in May 2011.
Downtown Browning in May 2011.
Location of Browning, Montana
Location of Browning, Montana
Coordinates: 48°33′25″N 113°0′52″W / 48.55694°N 113.01444°W / 48.55694; -113.01444Coordinates: 48°33′25″N 113°0′52″W / 48.55694°N 113.01444°W / 48.55694; -113.01444
Country United States
State Montana
County Glacier
Area[1]
 • Total 0.27 sq mi (0.70 km2)
 • Land 0.27 sq mi (0.70 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 4,377 ft (1,334 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,016
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,037
 • Density 3,763/sq mi (1,452.9/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 59417
Area code(s) 406
FIPS code 30-10375
GNIS feature ID 0802063
Website www.BrowningMontana.com

Browning is a town in Glacier County, Montana. The population was 1,016 at the 2010 United States Census.

Geography[edit]

Browning is located at 48°33′25″N 113°0′52″W / 48.55694°N 113.01444°W / 48.55694; -113.01444 (48.556917, -113.014571)[5].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.27 square miles (0.70 km2), all of it land.[1]

Church, Browning
Steam excursion train crossing Two Medicine River west of Browning, 2009.

Climate[edit]

From January 23, 1916 to January 24, 1916, the temperature fell 100°F (56°C) from 44°F (7°C) to -56°F (-49°C). This is the United States and also the world record for the greatest temperature change in 24 hours.[6][disputed ]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 986
1930 1,172 18.9%
1940 1,825 55.7%
1950 1,691 −7.3%
1960 2,011 18.9%
1970 1,700 −15.5%
1980 1,226 −27.9%
1990 1,170 −4.6%
2000 1,065 −9.0%
2010 1,016 −4.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
Montana Cities/Towns: 1890-2000[8]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,016 people, 360 households, and 243 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,763.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,452.9 /km2). There were 394 housing units at an average density of 1,459.3 per square mile (563.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 5.5% White, 92.7% Native American, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.7% of the population.

There were 360 households of which 45.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 28.6% were married couples living together, 28.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 10.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.5% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.43.

The median age in the town was 29.8 years. 33.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 23% were from 45 to 64; and 10.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 46.1% male and 53.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 1,065 people, 360 households, and 254 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,911.2 people per square mile (1,523.0/km²). There were 409 housing units at an average density of 1,502.0 per square mile (584.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 6.57% White, 90.52% Native American, 0.09% from other races, African American, 0.09% and 2.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.88% of the population.

There were 360 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.7% were married couples living together, 25.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the town the population was spread out with 31.5% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 83.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $23,879, and the median income for a family was $25,000. Males had a median income of $24,375 versus $20,972 for females. The per capita income for the town was $8,955. About 28.3% of families and 29.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 33.4% of those under age 18 and 23.6% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

Browning is the birthplace of professional boxer Joe Hipp and Native American poet James Welch. Blackfoot actor Steve Reevis was born here on August 14, 1962. He grew up on the Blackfeet Reservation. His films include Dances with Wolves, Geronimo: An American Legend, Fargo and The Missing. Robert Scriver operated a museum in Browning.

Media[edit]

Browning is home to low-power radio station KBWG-LP operating at 107.5 FM.[10]

Transportation[edit]

Education[edit]

Browning is home to Blackfeet Community College.

Popular culture[edit]

Browning is the setting for the TV-series X-Files episode "Shapes".

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ ~~~~
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Top Ten Montana Weather Events of the 20th Century". National Weather Service Unveils Montana's Top Ten Weather/Water/Climate Events of the 20th Century. National Weather Service. Retrieved 2007-03-09. 
  7. ^ U.S. Decennial Census
  8. ^ POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES* (CITIES/TOWNS) IN MONTANA, 1890 TO 2000
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "FM Query Results -- Audio Division (FCC) USA". Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved August 22, 2012. 

External links[edit]