Cut Bank, Montana

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"Cut Bank" redirects here. For other uses, see Cut Bank (disambiguation).
Cut Bank, Montana
City
Housing along the Cut Bank Creek
Housing along the Cut Bank Creek
Location of Cut Bank, Montana
Location of Cut Bank, Montana
Coordinates: 48°38′5″N 112°19′52″W / 48.63472°N 112.33111°W / 48.63472; -112.33111Coordinates: 48°38′5″N 112°19′52″W / 48.63472°N 112.33111°W / 48.63472; -112.33111
Country United States
State Montana
County Glacier
Area[1]
 • Total 0.99 sq mi (2.56 km2)
 • Land 0.99 sq mi (2.56 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 3,773 ft (1,150 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,869
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,963
 • Density 2,898.0/sq mi (1,118.9/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC−7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC−6)
ZIP code 59427
Area code(s) 406
FIPS code 30-18775
GNIS feature ID 0770395

Cut Bank is a city in and the county seat of Glacier County, Montana, United States, located just east-south-east of the "cut bank" (gorge) geographical feature which formed canyon-like along the eponymously named Cut Bank Creek river.[4] The population was 2,919 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Cut Bank is located at 48°38′5″N 112°19′52″W / 48.63472°N 112.33111°W / 48.63472; -112.33111 (48.634801, −112.331090).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.99 square miles (2.56 km2), all of it land.[1]

The city is located 30 miles south of the Canadian border. The name of the city comes from the cut bank (gorge)— a scenic hazard to navigation and a geologic feature of the same name. The Cut Bank Creek river is spanned cliffs to cliffs by a scenic elevated railway bridge high above the canyon floor less than a mile from the edge of the town.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 43
1910 500 1,062.8%
1920 1,181 136.2%
1930 845 −28.5%
1940 2,509 196.9%
1950 3,721 48.3%
1960 4,539 22.0%
1970 4,004 −11.8%
1980 3,688 −7.9%
1990 3,329 −9.7%
2000 3,105 −6.7%
2010 2,869 −7.6%
source:[6][7]

2010 census[edit]

At the 2010 census,[2] there were 2,869 people, 1,249 households and 739 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,898.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,118.9 /km2). There were 1,441 housing units at an average density of 1,455.6 per square mile (562.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 74.7% White, 0.2% African American, 19.0% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 5.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.5% of the population.

There were 1,249 households of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.4% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.8% were non-families. 35.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.94.

The median age was 41.2 years. 24.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.4% were from 25 to 44; 28.8% were from 45 to 64; and 16.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.2% male and 51.8% female.

Transportation[edit]

Cut Bank is served by Amtrak's Empire Builder long-distance train on its route from Chicago to Seattle. There is one eastbound and one westbound train per day.

A train of the same name served the city under Amtrak's predecessor, the Great Northern Railway. The city, in conjunction with Amtrak and the current track owner BNSF Railway, recently repainted its historic train station in the traditional Great Northern depot colors.

The city contains an important railroad freight yard operated by the BNSF.

Historical relics[edit]

The Cherokee Trail or Rocky Mountain Trail ended its 800 mile path in Cut Bank. Starting from Fort Smith, Arkansas, this trail was carved by thousands of Cherokee miners in the 1850s and 1860s, who sought gold mining rushes in Colorado, Wyoming and California.

On July 26, 1806, Captain Meriwether Lewis with George Drewyer (Drouillard), Joseph Fields and Reuben Fields camped with a party of eight young Blackfeet Indians. At first the meeting was cordial, but the encounter turned hostile when Lewis disclosed to the Blackfeet that the United States government had plans to supply all the Plains Indians with firearms for hunting. This was not good news for the Blackfeet, who until that point had controlled firearms through trade relations with the Hudson's Bay Company.

The Blackfeet decided to make off with the party’s guns and horses leaving them on foot. At this point, this was the only armed encounter with Indians during the entire expedition. Two of the young Blackfeet were killed in this fight over horses and guns.

This actual site was not discovered until 1964 by two Cut Bank Boy Scout leaders,who used the directions and descriptions contained in Lewis’ journal. The "three solitary trees" described by Lewis in his journal still stood in the place Lewis depicted. The site has been marked and fenced by the local Boy Scouts.

Captain Meriwether Lewis followed the north branch of the Marias River, now known as the Cut Bank Creek and camped south and east of Cut Bank on Monday, July 21, 1806.

There was no timber to be found to build a fire so buffalo chips were used. The company was nearly out of provisions. They wounded a buffalo, but were unable to retrieve it. The following day, the group proceeded to Camp Disappointment.

Climate[edit]

Cut Bank experiences a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk) with long, cold, dry winters and short, warm, wetter summers. In winter, bitterly cold arctic air masses move south and impact the eastern side of the American Continental Divide. During such invasions Cut Bank, with its comparatively high elevation and topography is frequently the coldest location in the lower 48 U.S. States. Being close to the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains also makes the area subject to occasional Chinook winds that can rapidly increase the local temperature.

Climate data for Cut Bank Municipal Airport
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 61
(16)
71
(22)
77
(25)
87
(31)
91
(33)
101
(38)
106
(41)
107
(42)
97
(36)
88
(31)
79
(26)
67
(19)
107
(42)
Average high °F (°C) 28.4
(−2)
33.7
(0.9)
40.7
(4.8)
52.2
(11.2)
61.1
(16.2)
68.6
(20.3)
76.3
(24.6)
75.6
(24.2)
65.3
(18.5)
54.0
(12.2)
38.0
(3.3)
29.9
(−1.2)
51.98
(11.08)
Daily mean °F (°C) 19.0
(−7.2)
23.7
(−4.6)
30.9
(−0.6)
41.0
(5)
49.7
(9.8)
57.2
(14)
63.1
(17.3)
62.5
(16.9)
52.9
(11.6)
42.9
(6.1)
29.5
(−1.4)
21.3
(−5.9)
41.14
(5.08)
Average low °F (°C) 9.5
(−12.5)
13.7
(−10.2)
21.0
(−6.1)
29.7
(−1.3)
38.3
(3.5)
45.8
(7.7)
49.9
(9.9)
49.3
(9.6)
40.5
(4.7)
31.7
(−0.2)
20.9
(−6.2)
12.6
(−10.8)
30.24
(−0.99)
Record low °F (°C) −46
(−43)
−47
(−44)
−34
(−37)
−25
(−32)
9
(−13)
21
(−6)
32
(0)
25
(−4)
−4
(−20)
−14
(−26)
−33
(−36)
−46
(−43)
−46
(−43)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.39
(9.9)
0.28
(7.1)
0.55
(14)
0.90
(22.9)
2.22
(56.4)
2.48
(63)
1.58
(40.1)
1.71
(43.4)
1.18
(30)
0.47
(11.9)
0.42
(10.7)
0.33
(8.4)
12.51
(317.8)
Source #1: NOAA (normals, 1971–2000) [8]
Source #2: The Weather Channel (Records) [9]

Notable people[edit]

References in popular culture[edit]

Cut Bank was the setting of the eponymous final track of Hank Williams, Junior's 1992 album, Maverick.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ Moffatt, Riley. Population History of Western U.S. Cities & Towns, 1850-1990. Lanham: Scarecrow, 1996, 129.
  7. ^ "Subcounty population estimates: Montana 2000-2007" (CSV). United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 18, 2009. Retrieved May 9, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Climatography of the United States NO.81". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Monthly Averages for Cut Bank, MT". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 

External links[edit]