California elections, 1998

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California's state elections were held November 3, 1998. Necessary primary elections were held on March 3. Up for election were all the seats of the California State Assembly, 20 seats of the California Senate, seven constitutional officers, all the seats of the California Board of Equalization, as well as votes on retention of two Supreme Court justices and various appeals court judges. Twelve ballot measures were also up for approval. Municipal offices were also included in the election.[1]

Constitutional Offices[edit]

Governor[edit]

See also California gubernatorial election, 1998.

Final results from Secretary of State.[2]

1998 California gubernatorial election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gray Davis 4,860,702 58.0%
Republican Dan Lungren 3,218,030 38.4%
Green Dan Hamburg 104,179 1.2%
Libertarian Steve Kubby 73,845 0.9%
Peace and Freedom Gloria Estela LaRiva 59,218 0.7%
American Independent Nathan E. Johnson 37,964 0.5%
Natural Law Harold H. Bloomfield 31,237 0.4%
No party Write-ins 21 0.0%
Invalid or blank votes 235,925 2.74%
Totals 8,621,121 100.0%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Democratic gain from Republican

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

See also California lieutenant governor election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California[3]

1998 Lieutenant Governor of California election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cruz Bustamante 4,290,473 52.7%
Republican Tim Leslie 3,161,031 38.8%
Green Sara Amir 247,897 3.0%
Libertarian Thomas Tryon 167,523 2.1%
Peace and Freedom Jaime Luis Gomez 109,888 1.4%
American Independent George McCoy 92,349 1.1%
Reform James Mangia 74,180 0.9%
Invalid or blank votes 477,780 5.54%
Totals 8,621,121 100.0%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Democratic hold

Secretary of State[edit]

See also California Secretary of State election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California.[4]

2002 California Secretary of State election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Jones 3,785,069 47.00%
Democratic Michela Alioto 3,695,344 45.89%
Libertarian Gail Lightfoot 216,853 2.69%
Natural Law Jane Ann Bialosky 103,631 1.29%
American Independent Carolyn Rae Short 100,265 1.25%
Peace and Freedom Israel Feuer 78,837 0.98%
Reform Valli Sharpe-Geisler 72,949 0.91%
Invalid or blank votes 568,173 6.59%
Totals 8,621,121 100.00%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Republican hold

Controller[edit]

See also California State Controller election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California.[5]

1998 California State Controller election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathleen Connell (incumbent) 4,875,969 60.91%
Republican Ruben Barrales 2,653,153 33.14%
Libertarian Pamela Pescosolido 147,397 1.84%
American Independent Alfred "Al" L. Burgess 108,847 1.36%
Reform Denise L. Jackson 100,683 1.26%
Peace and Freedom C. T. Weber 68,738 0.86%
Natural Law Iris Adam 50,990 0.64%
Invalid or blank votes 615,344 7.14%
Totals 8,621,121 100.00%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Democratic hold

Treasurer[edit]

See also California State Treasurer election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California.[6]

1998 California State Treasurer election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Phil Angelides 4,166,206 52.60%
Republican Curt Pringle 3,159,898 39.90%
Libertarian John Petersen 183,436 2.32%
Natural Law Carlos Aguirre 172,844 2.18%
Peace and Freedom Jan B. Tucker 146,226 1.85%
American Independent Edmon V. Kaiser 91,801 1.16%
Invalid or blank votes 700,710 8.13%
Totals 8,621,121 100.00%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Democratic gain from Republican

Attorney General[edit]

See also California Attorney General election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California.[7]

1998 California Attorney General election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Lockyer 4,119,139 51.50%
Republican Dave Stirling 3,389,709 42.38%
American Independent Diane Beall Templin 194,077 2.43%
Libertarian Joseph S. Farina 149,430 1.87%
Peace and Freedom Robert J. Evans 145,379 1.82%
Invalid or blank votes 623,387 7.23%
Totals 8,621,121 100.0%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Democratic gain from Republican

Insurance Commissioner[edit]

See also California Insurance Commissioner election, 1998.

Final results from the Secretary of State of California.[8]

1998 California Insurance Commissioner election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Quackenbush (incumbent) 4,006,762 49.86%
Democratic Diane Martinez 3,519,453 43.80%
Libertarian Dale F. Ogden 169,922 2.11%
Natural Law Barbara Bourdette 130,834 1.63%
Peace and Freedom Gary R. Ramos 116,091 1.44%
American Independent Merton D. Short 92,975 1.16%
Invalid or blank votes 585,084 6.79%
Totals 8,621,121 100.0%
Voter turnout 41.4%
Republican hold

Board of Equalization[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[1]

Overview[edit]

California Board of Equalization elections, 1998
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 3,974,343 55.79% 2 0
Republican 2,507,252 35.19% 2 0
Libertarian 509,288 7.15% 0 0
Peace and Freedom 75,012 1.05% 0 0
Green 58,480 0.82% 0 0
Invalid or blank votes 1,596,255 18.30%
Totals 8,720,630 100.00% 4

District 1[edit]

1998 State Board of Equalization District 1 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Johan Klehs (incumbent) 1,440,370 78.42%
Libertarian Kennita Watson 396,346 21.58%
Invalid or blank votes 665,707 26.60%
Totals 2,597,630 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

1998 State Board of Equalization District 2 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dean Andal (incumbent) 1,041,933 55.20%
Democratic Tom Y. Santos 845,533 44.80%
Invalid or blank votes 377,911 16.68%
Totals 2,265,377 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

1998 State Board of Equalization District 3 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Claude Parrish 1,028,148 53.10%
Democratic Mary Christian-Heising 806,716 41.66%
Libertarian J. R. Graham 71,428 3.69%
Peace and Freedom Maxine Bell Quirk 29,908 1.54%
Invalid or blank votes 357,795 15.60%
Totals 2,293,995 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

1998 State Board of Equalization District 4 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Chiang 881,724 60.23%
Republican Joe H. Adams, Jr. 437,171 29.86%
Green Glenn Trujillo Bailey 58,480 3.99%
Peace and Freedom Shirley Rachel Isaacson 45,104 3.08%
Libertarian William R. Jennings 41,514 2.84%
Invalid or blank votes 194,842 11.75%
Totals 1,658,835 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Judicial system[edit]

Supreme Court of California[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[2]

Chief Justice Ronald George
Vote on retention Votes %
Yes 4,656,520 75.49%
No 1,511,953 24.51%
Invalid 2,452,648 28.45%
Total votes 8,621,121 100.0%
Majority 3,144,567 49.98%
Turnout
Associate Justice Janice Rogers Brown, Seat 1
Vote on retention Votes %
Yes 4,376,553 75.91%
No 1,389,053 24.09%
Invalid 2,855,515 33.12%
Total votes 8,621,121 100.0%
Majority 987,500 51.82%
Turnout
Associate Justice Ming Chin, Seat 2
Vote on retention Votes %
Yes 4,203,767 69.26%
No 1,865,420 30.74%
Invalid 2,551,934 29.60%
Total votes 8,621,121 100.0%
Majority 2,338,347 38.42%
Turnout
Associate Justice Stanley Mosk, Seat 3
Vote on retention Votes %
Yes 4,158,457 70.51%
No 1,739,471 29.49%
Invalid 2,723,193 31.59%
Total votes 8,621,121 100.0%
Majority 2,418,986 45.2%
Turnout

California Courts of Appeal[edit]

See California Courts of Appeal elections, 1998.

California State Legislature elections[edit]

State Senate[edit]

For individual races see California State Senate elections, 1998.

There are 40 seats in the State Senate. For this election, candidates running in even-numbered districts ran for four-year terms.[9]

California State Senate - 1998 Seats
  Democratic-Held 23
  Republican-Held 16
  Independent Held 1
1998 Elections
  Democratic Held and Uncontested 8
  Contested 20
  Republican Held and Uncontested 11
  Independent Held and Uncontested 1
 Total
40

State Assembly[edit]

For individual races see California State Assembly elections, 1998.

All 80 biennially elected seats of the State Assembly were up for election this year. Each seat has a two-year term. The Democrats retained control of the State Assembly.[10]

California State Assembly - 1998 Seats
  Democratic-Held 43
  Republican-Held 37
1998 Elections
  Democratic Incumbent and Uncontested 32
  Republican Incumbent and Uncontested 23
  Contested, Open Seats 25
 Total
80

Statewide ballot propositions[edit]

Twelve ballot propositions qualified to be listed on the general election ballot in California. Eight measures passed while four failed.[11][12]

Proposition 1A[edit]

Proposition 1A would provide for a bond of $9.2 billion for funding for at least four years for class size reduction, to relieve overcrowding and accommodate student enrollment growth and to repair older schools and for wiring and cabling for education technology; and to upgrade and build new classrooms in California Community Colleges, California State University, and University of California systems. Proposition 1A passed with 62.5% approval.

Proposition 1[edit]

Proposition 1 would amend Article XIII A of the Constitution, added by Proposition 13, to allow repair or replacement of environmentally-contaminated property or structures without increasing the tax valuation of original or replacement property. Proposition 1 passed with 71.1% of the vote.

Proposition 2[edit]

Proposition 2 would impose repayment conditions on loans of transportation revenues to the General Fund and local entities; and designate local transportation funds as trust funds and require a transportation purpose for their use. Proposition 2 passed with 75.4% approval.

Proposition 3[edit]

Proposition 3 would change existing open primary law to require closed, partisan primaries for purposes of selecting delegates to national presidential nominating conventions, limiting voting for such delegates to voters registered by political party. Proposition 3 failed with 46.1% approval.

Proposition 4[edit]

Proposition 4 would prohibit trapping fur-bearing or non-game mammals with specified traps, such as poison and steel-jawed leghold traps, and would prohibit commerce in fur of such animals. Proposition 4 passed with 57.5% approval.

Proposition 5[edit]

Proposition 5 would specify terms and conditions of mandatory compact between state and Indian tribes for gambling on tribal land. Proposition 5 passed with 62.4% approval.

Proposition 6[edit]

Proposition 6 would make possession, transfer, or receipt of horses for slaughter for human consumption a felony, and would make the sale of horse meat for human consumption a misdemeanor. Proposition 6 passed with 59.4% approval.

Proposition 7[edit]

Proposition 7 would authorize $218 million in state tax credits annually, until January 2011, to encourage air-emissions reductions through the acquisition, conversion, and retrofitting of vehicles and equipment. Proposition 7 failed with 43.6% approval.

Proposition 8[edit]

Proposition 8 called for permanent class size reduction funding for districts establishing parent-teacher councils, testing for teacher credentialing, and pupil suspension for drug possession. Proposition 8 failed with 36.8% approval.

Proposition 9[edit]

Proposition 9 would prohibit assessment of taxes, bonds, and surcharges to pay costs of nuclear power plants. Proposition 9 failed with 26.5% approval.

Proposition 10[edit]

Proposition 10 would create state and county commissions to establish early childhood development and smoking prevention programs, and impose additional taxes on cigarettes and tobacco products. Proposition 10 passed with 50.5% approval.

Proposition 11[edit]

Proposition 11 would authorize local governments to voluntarily enter into sales tax revenue sharing agreements by a two-thirds vote of the local city council or board of supervisors of each participating jurisdiction. Proposition 11 passed with 53.4% approval.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]