Celticization

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During the first millennium BC, the early Celts expanded from a core territory in Central Europe to Iberia, the British Isles and later also the Balkans, and are assumed to have "Celticized" (Pre-Celtic) earlier populations such as Illyrians and Thracians.[1]

Illyria and Pannonia[edit]

The Celticization in Pannonia began as early as the 4th century BC.[2]La Tene type finds are characteristic in Pre-Roman Pannonia[3] and are considered a marker to variations in the degree of Celticization.Among the Illyrian tribes some were Celticized to varying degrees(some completely) like the Pannoni[4][5] and the Dalmatae.[6][7] A type of wooden oblong shield with an iron boss was introduced to Illyria from the Celts.[8] Illyrian chiefs and kings wore bronze torques around their necks[9] much like the Celts did.

By the 4th century BC[10] the Veneti had been so Celticized that Polybius wrote that the Veneti of the 2nd century BC were identical to the Celts except for language.

The Celts had two settlements that later became cities in Illyria, namely Navissos and Segestica. In Thrace they had Serdica[11] (modern Sofia, Bulgaria),Tylis,[12] founded by Gauls, Dunonia, Singidunum[13] and Taurunum.[14][15][16]

Many Celtic tribes or parts of Celtic tribes migrated to Illyria, Thrace and Dacia.

The gradual Celticization of all of Pannonia took place in the 3rd century BC.[17] Names became Celtic,[17] as seen in Roman times, and Celts had established control[18] north of the Save and south and west of the Danube. In the western half and west of Pannonia the Pre-Celtic language disappeared.[18] By the first half of the 1st century BC[19] the language of the Illyrians in Northern Dalmatia was completely Celticized. There is an abundance of Celtic names in Illyria sometimes making the Illyrian ones seem few.[20][21][22][23][24][25] Those parts of Pannonia that had not been conquered by the first Celtic invasion were already Celticized by the beginning of the 3rd century BC.[26] The Dalmatae[6] had been Celticized by the 3rd century BC.[7] In the region of Pannonia as a Roman province Celticization had almost completely eradicated Illyrian culture.[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Thracians 700 BC-AD 46 (Men-at-Arms) by Christopher Webber and Angus McBride, 2001, ISBN 1-84176-329-2
  2. ^ Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere,page 55,"In Chapter one it was seen that the Celticization of North Pannonia had already began in the 4th century bc.
  3. ^ Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere,page 26
  4. ^ Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere
  5. ^ The Oxford Classical Dictionary by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth,2003,page 1106
  6. ^ a b The Oxford Classical Dictionary by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth, 2003, page 426
  7. ^ a b A dictionary of the Roman Empire Oxford paperback reference, ISBN 0-19-510233-9, 1995, page 202,"contact with the peoples of the Illyrian kingdom and at the Celticized tribes of the Delmatae"
  8. ^ The Illyrians: history and culture,History and Culture Series,The Illyrians: History and Culture, Aleksandar Stipčević, ISBN 0-8155-5052-9, 1977, page 174,"Resembling the northern Illyrian oval shield was one introduced into Illyria by the Celts.Apart from the iron boss,nothing was preserved from these Celtic shields. It is known though that they were oblong shaped and made of wood with an umbo in the center"
  9. ^ The Illyrians by J. J. Wilkes, 1992, ISBN 0-631-19807-5, page 223,"Illyrian chiefs wore heavy bronze torques"
  10. ^ History of the Roman World: 753 to 146 BC by H. H. Scullard,2002,page 16: "... of healing. In the fourth century their culture became so Celticized that Polybius described the second-century Veneti as practically in- distinguishable ..."
  11. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 3, Part 2: The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth Centuries BC by John Boardman, I. E. S. Edwards, E. Sollberger, and N. G. L. Hammond, ISBN 0-521-22717-8, 1992, page 600: "In the place of the vanished Treres and Tilataei we find the Serdi for whom there is no evidence before the first century bc.It has for long being supposed on convincing linguistic and archeological grounds that this tribe was of Celtic origin"
  12. ^ Polybius, History, IV.46.
  13. ^ Celts and the Classical World by David Rankin, ISBN 0-415-15090-6, 1996, page 188: "of the survivors of Brenus expedition the Scordisci founded Singidunum in Yugoslavia"
  14. ^ The Oxford Classical Dictionary by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth,2003,page 429,"... Roman fleets, the Pannonian based on the upper course at Taurunum above Belgrade and the Moesian on the lower at Noviodunum ..."
  15. ^ The central Balkan tribes in pre-Roman times: Triballi, Autariatae, Dardanians, Scordisci and Moesians by Fanula Papazoglu, ISBN 90-256-0793-4, 1978,"Boii are connected with Taurunum, or Bononia"
  16. ^ Kontakte längs der Bernsteinstrasse: (zwischen Caput Adriae und den ... – page 29, by Zenon Woźniak, Muzeum Archeologiczne w Krakowie – 1996 – ... Taurunum (present-day Zemun), where a long – settled Scordisci community buried their dead in the cemetery at Karaburma
  17. ^ a b Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere,page 10,
  18. ^ a b Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere, page 12
  19. ^ Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere, page 27
  20. ^ Wilkes (1992): "Pinnes and Tato are present, from the Japodes Diteio and Ve(n)do, and a few names are of Celtic origin, Kabaletus, Litus, Nantanius, Sarnus, Sinus, Sisimbrius and Vepus." (p. 76)
  21. ^ Wilkes (1992): "A few names which occur in the upper Neretva valley around Konjic appear to be of Celtic origin: Bolo, Bricussa, lacus, Mallaius…" (p. 75)
  22. ^ Wilkes (1992): "The number of Illyrian names in that area, Genthena, Tatta, Dasius and Thana is small compared with the Celtic: Aioia, Andetia, Baeta, Bidna, Catta, Dussona, …" (p. 82)
  23. ^ Wilkes (1992): "Four names are accepted as definitely Celtic: Nantia, Nonntio, Poia and Sicu. Mellito has a Greek and Celtic element, while the Celtic associations of Ammida, Matera and Seneca remain questionable." (p. 79)
  24. ^ Wilkes (1992): "The number of Illyrian names in that area, Genthena, Tatta, Dasius and Thana is small compared with the Celtic: Aioia, Andetia, Baeta, Bidna, Catta, Dussona, Enena,laca, Madusa, Matisa, Nindia, Sarnus, …" (p. 82)
  25. ^ Wilkes (1992): "Apart from some names of Thracian origin, Bessus and Teres, and some Celtic names, Arvus, Belzeius, Cambrius, laritus, Lautus, Madussa and Argurianus (either Thracian or Celtic), the only name of south Illyrian origin is Plares." (p. 84)
  26. ^ Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. A Mocsy, S Frere,page 7
  27. ^ The cult of Silvanus: a study in Roman folk religion by Peter F. Dorcey, 1992, ISBN 90-04-09601-9, page 45

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