Centitone

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A centitone (also Iring) is a musical interval (21/600) of two cents (22/1200)[1] proposed as a unit of measurement (About this sound Play ) by Widogast Iring in Die reine Stimmung in der Musik (1898) as 600 steps per octave and later by Joseph Yasser in A Theory of Evolving Tonality (1932) as 100 steps per equal tempered whole tone.

Iring noticed that the Grad/Werckmeister (1.96 cents, 12 per Pythagorean comma) and the schisma (1.95 cents) are nearly the same (≈ 614 steps per octave) and both may be approximated by 600 steps per octave (2 cents).[2] Yasser promoted the decitone, centitone, and millitone (10, 100, and 1000 steps per whole tone = 60, 600, and 6000 steps per octave = 20, 2, and 0.2 cents).[3][4]

For example: Equal tempered perfect fifth = 700 cents = 175.6 savarts = 583.3 millioctaves = 350 centitones.[5]

Centitones Cents
1 centitone 2 cents
0.5 centitone 1 cents
21/600 22/1200
50 per semitone 100 per semitone
100 per whole tone 200 per whole tone

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Randel, Don Michael (1999). The Harvard Concise Dictionary of Music and Musicians, p.123. ISBN 9780674000841. Randel, Don Michael (2003). The Harvard Concise Dictionary of Music and Musicians, p.154 & 416. ISBN 9780674011632.
  2. ^ "Logarithmic Interval Measures", Huygens-Fokker.org.
  3. ^ Yasser, Joseph (1932). A Theory of Evolving Tonality, p.14. American Library of Musicology.
  4. ^ Farnsworth, Paul Randolph (1969). The Social Psychology of Music, p.24. ISBN 9780813815473.
  5. ^ Apel, Willi (1970). Harvard Dictionary of Music, p.363. Taylor & Francis.