Chicago Maroons football

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Chicago Maroons football
UChicago Maroons.svg
First season 1892
Athletic director TBA
Head coach Chris Wilkerson
1st year, 6–4  (.600)
Home stadium Stagg Field
Stadium capacity 1,650
Stadium surface FieldTurf
Location Chicago, Illinois
Conference UAA
All-time record 413–368–34 (.528)
Claimed national titles 2
Conference titles 10
Heisman winners 1
Consensus All-Americans 12
Current uniform
UChicagoUni.png
Colors

Maroon and White

          
Fight song Wave the Flag
Mascot Maroons
Website athletics.uchicago.edu

The Chicago Maroons are the college football team representing the University of Chicago. The Maroons play in NCAA Division III as a member of the University Athletic Association. From 1892 to 1939, the Maroons were a major college football power. The University of Chicago was a founding member of the Big Ten conference and the Maroons were coached by Amos Alonzo Stagg, one of the game's pioneers, for 41 seasons. In 1935, halfback Jay Berwanger became the first recipient of the Downtown Athletic Club Trophy, later known as the Heisman Trophy. However, The University of Chicago abolished its football program in 1939 and withdrew from the Big Ten in 1946. Football returned to the University of Chicago in 1963 in the form of a club team, which was upgraded to varsity status in 1969. The Maroons began competing in Division III in 1973.

Division history[edit]

Year Division
1937–1939 NCAA University Division (Major College)
1940–1962 No team
1963–1968 Club team
1969–1972 No Classification
1973–present NCAA Division III

Conferences[edit]

Year Conference
1892–1895 Independent
1896–1939 Big Ten Conference
1940–1962 No team
1963–1968 Club team
1969–1972 Independent
1973–1975 Division III Independent
1976–1987 Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference
1988–1989 Division III Independent
1990–present University Athletic Association
2015– Southern Athletic Association

Records[edit]

  • Most Wins: 16 (1899)
  • Most Losses: 10 (1991)
  • Most Ties: 3 (1924)

Championships[edit]

National championships[edit]

  • 1905 (National Championship Foundation Poll)
  • 1913 (Parke H. Davis) (2)

University Athletic Association championships[edit]

  • 1998
  • 2000 (2)
  • 2005 (3)
  • 2010 (4)

Big Ten Conference championships[edit]

  • 1899
  • 1905 (2)
  • 1907 (3)
  • 1908 (4)
  • 1913 (5)
  • 1922 (6)
  • 1924 (7)

All-Time Record Against Current Big Ten Members[1]

School Wins Losses Ties  %
Illinois 19 22 3 .466
Indiana 20 4 1 .789
Iowa 9 3 2 .714
Maryland* 1 0 0 1.000
Michigan 7 19 0 .269
Michigan State* 1 0 0 1.000
Minnesota 5 12 1 .306
Nebraska* 1 1 0 .500
Northwestern 26 8 3 .743
Ohio State 2 10 2 .214
Penn State* 0 0 0 N/A
Purdue 27 14 1 .655
Rutgers* 0 0 0 N/A
Wisconsin 16 19 5 .463

Note: Michigan State, Penn State, Nebraska, Maryland, and Rutgers were not members of the Big Ten when Chicago was a member.

Notable personnel[edit]

College Football Hall of Fame[edit]

Name Position Years Inducted Notes
Jay Berwanger Halfback 1933–1935 1954 First recipient of the Heisman Trophy
Hugo Bezdek Fullback 1905 1954 Inducted for his career as a coach at Oregon, Arkansas, and Penn State
Fritz Crisler End 1919–1921 1954 Inducted for his career as a coach at Minnesota, Princeton, and Michigan
Paul Des Jardien Center 1912–1914 1955 All-American in 1913 and 1914
Walter Eckersall Quarterback 1903–1906 1951 Leader of the 1905 national championship team
Clarence Herschberger Fullback 1895–1898 1970 First western player selected as a first-team All-American
Tiny Maxwell Guard 1902, 1904–1905 1974 All-American for 1905 national championship team
Clark Shaughnessy Coach 1933–1939 1968 College football coach for 50 years
Amos Alonzo Stagg Coach 1892–1932 1951 "The Grand Old Man of the Midway"
Walter Steffen Quarterback 1906–1908 1969 Scored 156 points for teams that went 13-2-1; First-team All-American, 1908
Andy "Polyphemus" Wyant Guard, Center 1892–1894 1962 Played 8 varsity seasons of college football for Bucknell and Chicago

Others[edit]

  • Walter S. Kennedy, quarterback for Stagg's 1898-1899 teams
  • Walter E. Marks, fullback and halfback, 1924–1926; leader of Chicago's last Big Ten championship team
  • Nelson Norgren, played football under Stagg, coached Chicago basketball team, 1921–1942, 1944–1957
  • Laurens Shull, All-American, killed in action during World War I
  • Frederick A. Speik, end, All-American, 1904
  • Herman Stegeman, played for 1913 national championship; later coached football, baseball, basketball and track at Georgia
  • John Webster Thomas, fullback, All-American 1922, played for Stagg 1921-1923
  • Mysterious Walker, played for Stagg, 1904–1906; coached college teams, 1907–1940
  • Edwin E. "Big Ed" Parry, Edwin Eugene "Ed" Parry (March 11, 1885 – November 30, 1966) was an American football player and coach. He played football under Stagg from 1905-1909; . He served as the head football coach at Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, now Oklahoma State University–Stillwater, for two seasons, from 1907 to 1908, compiling a record of 5–6–1.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]