Coat of arms of Haiti

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Coat of arms of Haiti
Coat of arms of Haiti.svg
Versions
Coat of arms of Haiti (1964-1986).svg
1964-1986 (Duvalier era)
Details
Armiger Republic of Haiti
Adopted 1986
Crest Phrygian cap
Motto L'Union Fait La Force
"Unity Makes Strength"

The coat of arms of Haiti was originally introduced in 1807, and has appeared in its current form since 1986.

It shows six draped flags of the country, three on each side, which are located before a palm tree and cannons on a green lawn. On the lawn various items are found, such as a drum, bugles, long guns, and ship anchors. Above the palm tree, there is a Phrygian cap placed as a symbol of freedom. On the lawn between the drum and the ribbon there were supposed to be two pieces of chain with a broken link symbolizing the broken chain of slavery.[citation needed]

The ribbon bears the motto: L'Union Fait La Force (French, "Unity Makes Strength"). This should not be confused with the national motto of Haiti, which according to the Constitution of Haiti is "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity."

The oldest use of a symbol for Haiti is known since 1807. The symbol shows several national flags, with two cannons and palm trees. The symbol indicates the battle for independence of the republic. The motto, in French, means 'Strength through unity'. The symbol remained in use until 1849, when President General Faustin Soulouque crowned himself as Emperor Faustin I. At the same time he adopted new Imperial arms, showing two cannons and a (French) imperial eagle. Two lions were used as supporter and the whole placed in a purple mantle. The emperor was forced to leave the country in 1859, after which the old symbol was restored. Ever since the composition has been the same, but the colors and items have changed somewhat.[1]

Notes[edit]