D. V. Graves

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D. V. Graves
D. V. Graves.png
c. 1945
Sport(s) football, basketball, Baseball
Biographical details
Born (1886-11-27)November 27, 1886
Lincoln County, Missouri[1]
Died January 16, 1960(1960-01-16) (aged 73)
Seattle, Washington
Playing career
Football
1906–1908
1909

Missouri
Idaho
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1911–1914
1915–1917
1918
1920–1921
1922–1938
1942–1945

Basketball
1912–1915
1915–1916
1920–1922
1922–1946

Baseball
1912–1915
1912
1916–1919
1923–1946

Alabama
Texas A&M (assistant)
Texas A&M
Montana Agricultural
Washington (assistant)
Washington (assistant)


Alabama
Texas A&M
Montana Agricultural
Washington (assistant)


Alabama
La Junta Railroaders (minors)
Texas A&M
Washington
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1911–1915
1946–1960
Alabama
Washington (assistant AD)
Head coaching record
Overall 32–18–4 (football)
50–27 (basketball)
348–185–8 (college baseball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse

Dorsett Vandeventer "Tubby" Graves (November 27, 1886 – January 16, 1960) was a college head coach in baseball, football, and basketball, and a player of football and baseball.[1][2]

A head coach in three sports, Graves was primarily a baseball coach, and led three college programs for a total of 32 seasons. He began at the University of Alabama for four seasons (1912–1915), spent another four at Texas A&M University (1916–1919), and finished with 24 seasons the University of Washington (1923–1946).

In the sport of football, he was a college head coach for seven seasons: at Alabama (1911–1914), Texas A&M (1918), and the Agricultural College of the State of Montana—now Montana State University (1920–1921), compiling a career record of 32–18–4. In basketball, he served as a head coach for six years: at Alabama (1912–1915), Texas A&M (1915–1916), and Montana Agricultural (1920–1922). At Washington, he was a longtime assistant coach in football and basketball, and later an assistant athletic director.

In the summer of 1912, Graves was the manager of the La Junta Railroaders, a minor league baseball team in Colorado of the short-lived Rocky Mountain League.[3][4]

Early years[edit]

Born in Missouri, Graves was one of ten children of a doctor, and his two given names were surnames of two physicians.[1] He played college football at Missouri from 1906 to 1908, and after his eligibility was used up in the Midwest, he moved to the Northwest and played at Idaho on the Palouse for a season in 1909.[5][6] After college, Graves played baseball in the minor leagues.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Baseball[edit]

Graves was the head coach at Alabama, Texas A&M, and Washington, where he led the Huskies in Seattle for 24 seasons (1923–1946). Graves had a long-standing amicable rivalry with Buck Bailey of Washington State,[7][8][9] whom he coached in baseball and football at Texas A&M.[10]

Football[edit]

After several years of playing baseball in the minors, he coached football at Alabama, Texas A&M, and what is now Montana State.[1] From 1911 to 1914, he led the Alabama program to a 21–12–3 record. In his only season at Texas A&M in 1918, he compiled a 6–1 record. At Montana Agricultural in Bozeman, he had a 5–5–1 record over two seasons. While head coach of the baseball team at Washington, Graves also served as an assistant coach in football to several coaches.[11]

Basketball[edit]

Graves was a head basketball coach for six seasons, the first three at Alabama, where he was the program's first coach and compiled a record of 20–12 (.625) from 1912 to 1915.[12] He later headed the Texas A&M program for a season and two at Montana Agricultural. At Washington, he was an assistant coach for 24 seasons under head coach Hec Edmundson. Graves had met Edmundson at Idaho when they were undergraduate athletes, and both were head coaches at Texas A&M in the spring of 1919, Edmundson in track and Graves in baseball.[1]

After coaching[edit]

After stepping down as baseball coach at Washington, Graves became an assistant athletic director at the university, where he remained until his death.[2] He was also involved with horse racing in the state as a race steward at Longacres in Renton and Playfair Race Course in Spokane.[9][13][14][15]

Death[edit]

While visiting Pullman in the spring of 1959, Graves fell and broke a hip.[8][16] That December, he was hospitalized in Seattle for treatment of a liver ailment and died several weeks later in January 1960 at age 73.[1][2] He is buried at Calvary Cemetery in Seattle, about a mile (1.6 km) northeast of the university.

The UW athletic office building (1964)[7][17] and the two former baseball fields (through 1997) were named for Graves; he was posthumously inducted into the Big W Club, the UW athletics hall of fame, in 1980.[18]

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Alabama Crimson Tide (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1911–1914)
1911 Alabama 5–2–2 2–2–2
1912 Alabama 5–3–1 3–3–1
1913 Alabama 6–3 4–3
1914 Alabama 5–4 4–3
Alabama: 21–12–3 13–11–3
Texas A&M Aggies (Southwest Conference) (1918)
1918 Texas A&M 6–1 1–1 T–3rd
Texas A&M: 6–1 1–1
Montana Agricultural Bobcats (Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference) (1920–1921)
1920 Montana Agricultural 3–1–1
1921 Montana Agricultural 2–4
Montana Agricultural: 5–5–1
Total: 32–18–4

Baseball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Alabama Crimson Tide (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1912–1915)
1912 Alabama 16–6
1913 Alabama 22–7
1914 Alabama 11–13
1915 Alabama 17–14–1
Alabama: 66–30–1 (.686)
Texas A&M Aggies (Southwest Conference) (1916–1919)
1916 Texas A&M 17–8 8–7 3rd
1917 Texas A&M 9–5–3 2–4 3rd
1918 Texas A&M 14–5 4–4 2nd
1919 Texas A&M 8–6 4–4 2nd
Texas A&M: 48–24–3 (.660) 18–19 (.486)
Washington Huskies (Pacific Coast Conference) (1923–1946)
1923 Washington 16–4 8–1 1st (North)
1924 Washington 15–6–1 10–5–1 2nd
1925 Washington 11–2 8–2 1st (North)
1926 Washington 8–3 8–3 1st (North)
1927 Washington 7–7 5–4 4th (North)
1928 Washington 6–4 4–4 4th (North)
1929 Washington 12–7 9–6 1st (North)
1930 Washington 10–3 10–3 1st (North)
1931 Washington 13–3 13–3 1st (North)
1932 Washington 15–4 13–4 1st (North)
1933 Washington 7–3 3–3 T–2nd (North)
1934 Washington 8–8 6–8 4th (North)
1935 Washington 13–13–1 10–6 2nd (North)
1936 Washington 15–10 9–7 T–2nd (North)
1937 Washington 7–7 7–7 3rd (North)
1938 Washington 7–15–1 4–12 5th (North)
1939 Washington 9–12 6–10 4th (North)
1940 Washington 7–13 4–11 5th (North)
1941 Washington 10–6 10–6 2nd (North)
1942 Washington 8–8 8–8 2nd (North)
1943 Washington 10–7 8–7 3rd (North)
1944 Washington 5–5–1 Independent
1945 Washington 4–9 2–2 2nd (North)
1946 Washington 11–7 8–8 3rd (North)
Washington: 234–131–4 (.637)
Total: 348–185–8 (.651)

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Source:[19][20][21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Eskenazi, David (November 12, 2013). "Wayback Machine: Dorsett V. 'Tubby' Graves". Sports Press Northwest. Retrieved September 21, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "Tubby Graves dies in Seattle". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. January 18, 1960. p. 13. 
  3. ^ "Welch to keep Tub". Vancouver Sun. January 29, 1942. p. 14. 
  4. ^ "Tubby Graves Minor League Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 24 June 2010. 
  5. ^ Johnson, Bob (January 23, 1960). "Records are straight". Spokane Daily Chronicle. p. 8. 
  6. ^ "Varsity Football: 1909 season". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. May 1910. p. 104. 
  7. ^ a b "Buck Bailey returns favor". Spokesman-Review. April 29, 1964. p. 14. 
  8. ^ a b "Hospital session". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (photo). April 23, 1959. p. 34. 
  9. ^ a b Missildine, Harry (January 19, 1960). "Graves' death leaves unfillable gap". Spokesman-Review. p. 12. 
  10. ^ Fry, Dick (March 26, 1961). "The life and legend of Buck Bailey, 34 years a Cougar". Spokesman-Review. p. 5, sports. 
  11. ^ "Washington grid staff now completed". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. February 22, 1942. p. 10. 
  12. ^ "Alabama Head Coaches All-Time Record Breakdown". RollTide.com. Retrieved 2007-03-10. 
  13. ^ "Longacres officials are named". Spokane Daily Chronicle. United Press. April 11, 1951. p. 1. 
  14. ^ "Tubby Graves named steward at Playfair". Spokane Daily Chronicle. August 22, 1951. p. 22. 
  15. ^ "Graves to head officials' staff for race meet". Spokane Daily Chronicle. August 18, 1956. p. 8. 
  16. ^ "Graves injured in Pullman fall". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. April 18, 1959. p. 8. 
  17. ^ Missildine, Harry (September 4, 1963). "Call it the Graves-Hilton". Spokesman-Review. p. 12. 
  18. ^ "Big W Club - Hall of Fame". The Tyee Club, University of Washington Athletics. Retrieved June 16, 2011. 
  19. ^ "Baseball: record book". University of Washington Athletics. 2013. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Baseball: media guide". University of Alabama Athletics. 2014. p. 108. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Baseball: media guide". Texas A&M University Athletics. 2014. pp. 120, 123. Retrieved September 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]