Darkesville, West Virginia

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Darkesville Historic District
Darkesville, West Virginia is located in West Virginia
Darkesville, West Virginia
Location US 11 at Middle Creek, Darkesville, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°22′27″N 78°1′25″W / 39.37417°N 78.02361°W / 39.37417; -78.02361Coordinates: 39°22′27″N 78°1′25″W / 39.37417°N 78.02361°W / 39.37417; -78.02361
Architect Multiple
Architectural style Greek Revival, Gothic, Federal
Governing body Private
MPS Berkeley County MRA
NRHP Reference # 80004410[1]
Added to NRHP December 10, 1980

Darkesville is an unincorporated community in Berkeley County, West Virginia, United States. Established in 1791,[2] Darkesville has been nationally recognized as a historic district.[3]:7

A post office and school (now closed) once operated in Darkesville.[4][5]

Geography[edit]

Darkesville lies between Inwood and Martinsburg along U.S. Route 11.[6] The community's elevation is 531 feet (162 m), and it is located at about 39°22′25″N 78°1′30″W / 39.37361°N 78.02500°W / 39.37361; -78.02500 (39.3738500, -78.0248602).[2]

Middle Creek flows through the center of Darkesville.[6]

Name[edit]

Darkesville is named for William Darke, a Virginia military officer who had his headquarters in the community.[3]:7 Historically, Darkesville has been known by various names and a wide variety of spellings. An 1895 atlas showed the community as "Buckletown", and later variants included "Buckellstown", "Buckels Town", "Buckelstown", "Buckle Town" and "Bucklestown". "James Town" and "Locke" have also been applied to the community. Its current name has also been spelled "Darkes" and "Darkville".[2]

Historic district[edit]

In 1980, the community was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district.[1] Darkesville was recognized for its historic architecture, which includes approximately twenty-five buildings constructed as log cabins in 1810 or earlier.[3]:2, 12, 13

References[edit]