DeShawn Stevenson

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DeShawn Stevenson
DeShawn Stevenson at the Championship parade.jpg
Stevenson at the Dallas Mavericks championship parade in 2011
Free Agent
Shooting guard / Small forward
Personal information
Born (1981-04-03) April 3, 1981 (age 33)
Fresno, California
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Listed weight 218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school Washington Union
(Easton, California)
NBA draft 2000 / Round: 1 / Pick: 23rd overall
Selected by the Utah Jazz
Pro playing career 2000–present
Career history
20002004 Utah Jazz
20042006 Orlando Magic
20062010 Washington Wizards
2010–2011 Dallas Mavericks
2011–2012 New Jersey Nets
2012–2013 Atlanta Hawks
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

DeShawn Stevenson (born April 3, 1981) is an American professional basketball player who is currently a free agent. He last played for the Atlanta Hawks of the NBA. Before his NBA career, he originally committed to play at the University of Kansas, but decided to enter the NBA directly from Washington Union High School in his hometown of Fresno, California, and was picked by the Utah Jazz with the 23rd selection of the 2000 NBA Draft. He is well known for his defense and his athleticism.

Early life[edit]

Stevenson was born in Fresno, California. His father, Darryl Stevenson, never married the mother of his child, and eventually was forcibly placed in a facility after threatening family members. Darryl signed a court order agreeing he had a duty to support his son, but eventually murdered his own mother and died of cancer at the age of 36. DeShawn's name was tattooed on his chest.[1][2] Due to the absence of his father, DeShawn lived with his godparents in Easton, California. He played high school ball at the same school his father had played at, and won a state championship his junior year.

Kansas Jayhawks head coach Roy Williams called him the "most gifted recruit ever". Stevenson averaged 30.4 points, 9.7 rebounds and 6.2 assists a game as a senior. Not only was he named to the McDonald's All-American team, he scored 25 points to lead the West to a 146–120 win, and won the slam-dunk contest, to boot. His mother advised her son not to go straight into the NBA, but after there were irregularities with his SAT test, Stevenson did indeed enter the professional league straight out of high school.[3][4]

NBA career[edit]

Utah Jazz[edit]

Stevenson was picked by the Utah Jazz with the 23rd selection of the 2000 NBA Draft.

Stevenson appeared in 222 regular season games during his time with Utah. He averaged 5.9 ppg., 1.9 rpg. and 1.2 apg. in 16.7 minpg. during that time. Stevenson played in five career playoff outings. At 19 years old, he became the youngest player to ever play and start for the Jazz during the 2000–01 season. In 2001, Stevenson finished second in the NBA Slam Dunk Contest.[5] Later that year, Stevenson pleaded no contest to having sex with a 14 year old girl.[6]

On February 19, 2004, Stevenson and a future second round draft pick were acquired by the Orlando Magic from the Utah Jazz in exchange for guard–forward Gordan Giricek.

Orlando Magic[edit]

Stevenson played with the Orlando Magic for 2½ seasons. He had his best year during the 2005–06 season when he averaged 11.0 ppg, 2.9 rpg, and 2.0 apg. Stevenson opted out of the third and final year of his contract with Orlando and on August 5, 2006 he signed a two-year minimum contract with the Washington Wizards.[7]

Washington Wizards[edit]

Stevenson in a game against the Portland Trail Blazers, being defended by Brandon Roy.

On August 5, 2006, Stevenson signed a two-year contract with the Washington Wizards worth the NBA minimum salary. Stevenson quickly adjusted to coach Eddie Jordan's system, averaging 11.2 ppg, 2.7 rpg, and 2.7 apg in his first season with Washington. Following the 2006–07 season, he opted-out of the second year of the his contract to test free agency. On July 16, 2007, Stevenson re-signed with the Wizards on a 4-year, $15 million deal.[8]

On the early morning of August 20, 2007, a 31-year-old man, Curtis Ruff, was shot and injured at Stevenson's home, following an argument with women that were invited from Destiny's Club in Orlando. Circumstances of the incident remain unclear.[9]

After Stevenson, with a sore knee, scored a career-high 33 points, including a game winning three-pointer as time expired in a February 25, 2008 victory over the New Orleans Hornets, Wizards coach Eddie Jordan described Stevenson by saying, "He's a warrior, man, a true warrior. His confidence is growing, he's making threes, he's just a true pro. This is a man's league and he is man. In the dictionary next to that word there is a picture of DeShawn Stevenson."[10]

At the start of the 2008–09 season, Stevenson struggled and could not bring his offensive game to the level it was in 2007. As a result Stevenson's minutes dipped slightly with the development of second year shooting guard Nick Young and former Maryland standout Juan Dixon.

Dallas Mavericks[edit]

On February 13, 2010, Stevenson was traded to the Dallas Mavericks along with Caron Butler and Brendan Haywood for Josh Howard, Drew Gooden, James Singleton and Quinton Ross.[11] He became the first player in NBA history to wear the number 92 on his jersey. Stevenson chose number 92 because he wore number 9 in Orlando and number 2 with Utah and Washington.[12] He used his player option and made $4.15 million during the 2010–11 NBA season.[13] On June 12, 2011, Stevenson won the NBA championship when the Mavericks beat the Miami Heat 105-95 in Game 6 of the NBA Finals. In that game, Stevenson made three of five three point shots, resulting in 9 crucial points.[14] Even more important than any contributions he made on offense may have been his assignment to guard LeBron James throughout the series, in part causing James to average significantly lower than his regular season average on most major statistical categories.

New Jersey Nets[edit]

On December 23, 2011, Stevenson signed one-year $2.5 million contract with the New Jersey Nets.[15]

Atlanta Hawks[edit]

On July 11, 2012, the Nets traded Stevenson (sign-and-trade), Jordan Farmar, Jordan Williams, Anthony Morrow, and Johan Petro to the Atlanta Hawks for Joe Johnson.[16] On August 2, 2013, he was waived by the Hawks.[17][18]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Correct as of 2012–13 season

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2000–01 Utah 40 2 7.3 .341 .083 .684 .7 .5 .3 .1 2.2
2001–02 Utah 67 23 16.9 .385 .080 .698 2.0 1.7 .4 .4 4.9
2002–03 Utah 61 8 12.5 .401 .333 .691 1.4 .7 .4 .1 4.6
2003–04 Utah 54 54 28.0 .445 .233 .669 3.3 1.7 .5 .3 11.4
2003–04 Orlando 26 24 35.9 .404 .293 .690 4.6 2.5 .9 .0 11.2
2004–05 Orlando 55 27 19.8 .408 .373 .554 1.9 1.3 .3 .2 7.8
2005–06 Orlando 82 82 32.3 .460 .133 .744 2.9 2.0 .7 .2 11.0
2006–07 Washington 82 82 29.5 .461 .404 .704 2.6 2.7 .8 .2 11.2
2007–08 Washington 82 82 31.3 .386 .383 .797 2.9 3.1 .8 .2 11.2
2008–09 Washington 32 25 27.7 .312 .271 .533 2.4 3.1 .7 .1 6.6
2009–10 Washington 40 13 15.4 .282 .177 .720 1.6 1.1 .3 .1 2.2
2009–10 Dallas 24 5 11.1 .283 .320 .700 1.1 .5 .2 .0 2.0
2010–11 Dallas 72 54 16.1 .388 .378 .767 1.5 1.1 .3 .1 5.3
2011–12 New Jersey 51 30 18.8 .285 .283 .563 2.0 .8 .4 .1 2.9
2012–13 Atlanta 56 31 20.7 .374 .364 .522 2.2 .9 .5 .1 5.1
Career 824 542 22.3 .406 .340 .698 2.2 1.6 .5 .2 7.2

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001 Utah 1 0 8.0 .500 .000 .000 1.0 .0 .0 .0 2.0
2003 Utah 4 0 9.3 .400 .000 1.000 1.8 1.0 .3 .0 4.5
2007 Washington 4 4 30.5 .196 .158 .429 2.5 1.8 .5 .8 6.0
2008 Washington 6 6 32.7 .367 .389 .889 2.2 3.0 1.0 .0 12.3
2010 Dallas 2 0 3.0 .000 .000 .000 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0
2011 Dallas 21 18 15.8 .349 .397 .750 .9 .6 .5 .1 4.5
2013 Atlanta 4 0 11.3 .600 .600 .000 2.5 .3 .0 .0 2.3
Career 42 28 17.8 .327 .353 .791 1.4 1.0 .5 .1 5.3

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ "Stevenson follows dad’s dream to NBA". Lawrence Journal-World. Associated Press. July 22, 2000. 
  3. ^ Bedore, Gary (May 9, 2000). "Stevenson picks Kansas after all". Lawrence Journal-World. Archived from the original on May 4, 2001. 
  4. ^ "Memphis basketball teaches the wrong lesson". The Oregonian. June 5, 2009. 
  5. ^ Slam Dunk Year-by-Year Results
  6. ^ McCarthy, Michael; Upton, Jodi (May 4, 2006). "Athletes lightly punished after their day in court". USA Today. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  7. ^ "ESPN - Wizards sign former Magic guard Stevenson - NBA". Sports.espn.go.com. 2006-08-05. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  8. ^ "NBA.com News Flash". NBA.com. July 16, 2007. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  9. ^ POSTED: 10:32 am EDT August 20, 2007 (2007-08-20). "Man Injured In Shooting At NBA Player's Home". Wesh.com. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  10. ^ Magazine, Dime (2008-02-26). "Worlds Apart | Dime Magazine (dimemag.com) : Daily NBA News, NBA Trades, NBA Rumors, Basketball Videos, Sneakers". dimemag.com. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  11. ^ "MAVERICKS ACQUIRE BUTLER, HAYWOOD AND STEVENSON IN SEVEN-PLAYER TRADE". NBA.com. 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  12. ^ "NBA & ABA Players Who Wore Number 92". basketball-reference.com. 2010-03-15. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  13. ^ "Stevenson uses his Option". Sports.espn.go.com. 2010-05-24. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  14. ^ "Mavs' Big Team sheds negative labels with team's first title". NBA.com. 2011-06-13. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  15. ^ "NETS Sign DeShawn Stevenson". NBA.com. 2011-12-23. Retrieved 2011-12-23. 
  16. ^ Couch, Ben (July 11, 2012). "A Jolt of Joe for the Nets". Brooklyn Nets. Retrieved July 11, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Hawks Waive DeShawn Stevenson". HoopsRumors.com. August 2, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Atlanta Hawks expected to add DeMarre Carroll". InsideHoops.com. August 2, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 

External links[edit]