Estonian parliamentary election, 2007

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Estonian parliamentary election, 2007
Estonia
2003 ←
4 March 2007
→ 2011

101 seats in the Riigikogu
51 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party
  Ansip, Andrus (2007) crop.jpg Edgar Savisaar 2005.jpg
Leader Andrus Ansip Edgar Savisaar
Party Reform Party Centre Party
Last election 19 seats 28 seats
Seats won 31 29
Seat change +12 +1
Popular vote 153,044 143,518
Percentage 27.8% 26.1%

Prime Minister before election

Andrus Ansip
Reform Party

Elected Prime Minister

Andrus Ansip
Reform Party

Leading party by municipality:
ERE EKE IM/RP SDE EMRL
  20–29%
  30–39%
  40–49%
  50–59%
  20–29%
  30–39%
  40–49%
  50–59%
  60–69%
  70–79%
  20–29%
  30–39%
  40–49%
  50–59%
  20–29%
  30–39%
  40–49%
  50–59%
  20–29%
  30–39%
  40–49%
  50–59%
  60–69%
  80–89%

Parliamentary elections were held in Estonia on 4 March 2007. It was the world's first nationwide vote where part of the voting was carried out in the form of remote electronic voting via the internet.

The election saw the Estonian Reform Party emerged as the largest faction in the Riigikogu with 31 seats. The Estonian Centre Party finished second with 29 seats, whilst the new Union of Pro Patria and Res Publica lost 16 seats compared to the 35 won by the two parties in the 2003 elections. The Social Democrats gained 4 seats, whilst the Greens entered the Riigikogu for the first time with 7 seats and the People's Union lost seven of its 13 seats.

Background[edit]

The Centre Party, led by the mayor of Tallinn Edgar Savisaar, had been increasingly excluded from collaboration, since his open collaboration with Putin's United Russia party, real estate scandals in Tallinn,[1] and the Bronze Soldier controversy, considered as a deliberate attempt to split Estonian society by provoking the Russian minority.[2]

Electoral system[edit]

In 2007 Estonia held its and the world's first national Internet election. Voting was available from February 26 to 28.[3] A total of 30,275 citizens (3.4%) used Internet voting.[4]

Electronic voting in Estonia began in October 2005 local elections when Estonia became the first country to have legally binding general elections using the Internet as a means of casting the vote and was declared a success by the Estonian election officials.

The electoral system was a two-tier semi-open list proportional representation system with a 5% (27,510.65 votes) election threshold.

Seats by electoral district[edit]

District number Electoral District Seats
1 Haabersti, Põhja-Tallinn and Kristiine districts in Tallinn 8
2 Kesklinn, Lasnamäe and Pirita districts in Tallinn 11
3 Mustamäe and Nõmme districts in Tallinn 8
4 Harjumaa (without Tallinn) and Raplamaa counties 13
5 Hiiumaa, Läänemaa and Saaremaa counties 7
6 Lääne-Virumaa county 6
7 Ida-Virumaa county 8
8 Järvamaa and Viljandimaa counties 8
9 Jõgevamaa and Tartumaa counties (without Tartu) 7
10 Tartu city 8
11 Võrumaa, Valgamaa and Põlvamaa counties 9
12 Pärnumaa county 8

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Estonian Reform Party 153,044 27.8 31 +12
Estonian Centre Party 143,518 26.1 29 +1
Pro Patria and Res Publica Union 98,347 17.9 19 –16
Social Democratic Party 58,363 10.6 10 +4
Estonian Greens 39,279 7.1 6 New
People's Union of Estonia 39,215 7.1 6 –7
Party of Estonian Christian Democrats 9,456 1.7 0 0
Constitution Party 5,464 1.0 0 0
Estonian Independence Party 1,273 0.2 0 0
Russian Party in Estonia 1,084 0.2 0 0
Estonian Left Party 607 0.1 0 0
Independents 563 0.1 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 5,250
Total 555,463 100 101 0
Registered voters/turnout 897,243 61.9
Source: Nohlen & Stöver,[5] IPU

References[edit]

External links[edit]