EuroCity

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For other uses, see EuroCity (disambiguation).
Eurocity Logo
EuroCity 37 from Geneva to Venice

EuroCity, abbreviated as EC, and meaning "EuroCity express" or "EuroCity express train", is a cross-border train category within the European inter-city rail network.[1] In contrast to trains allocated to the lower-level "IC" (InterCity) category, EC trains are international services that meet 20 criteria covering comfort, speed, food service and cleanliness.[2] Each EC train is operated by more than one EU (or Swiss)-based rail company, under a multilateral co-operative arrangement, and all EC trains link important European cities with each other.[3]

The EuroCity label replaced the older Trans Europ Express (TEE) name for border-crossing trains in Europe. Whereas TEE services were first-class only, EuroCity trains convey first and second class coaches.[2] The EuroCity schedule was designed with train pairs running one train in both directions,[clarification needed] thus resulting in a more frequent service than the TEE, which normally ran only once a day.

Criteria[edit]

German Class 101 locomotive pulling a EuroCity train consisting of Swiss and German coaches
Eurocity operated by SBB at Yverdon Station

The criteria EuroCity trains are required to meet include the following:

  • train through two or more countries
  • all cars air-conditioned
  • stop only at stations serving major cities
  • stops scheduled to last no more than five minutes, in special cases up to 15 minutes
  • food and beverages available onboard (preferably from a dining car)
  • conductors speak at least two languages, one of which must be English, French or German
  • average speed (including stops) above 90 kilometres per hour (56 mph), exceptions for routes including mountainous terrain and train ferries

In 1993 it was decided that EuroCity trains must complete their journey between 6:00 am and midnight. The night services are operated as EuroNight since 23 May 1993.[4]

Names[edit]

Originally, all EuroCity trains carried names, and many still do, continuing the practice started with the luxury trains of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The names are printed on brochures showing the times of arrival and departure at every stop and details of the journey; these are placed on the seats by the train staff. A few trains have used the names of the earlier Trans Europ Express or InterCity trains that they replaced on the same route, for example Iris for Brussels to Zürich. The names were mostly related to the cities and region the trains served and chosen from historical or mythological figures, geographical and botanical names or regional products. In 1991, the decision was made to name the EuroCity services after famous Europeans,[5] which in some cases resulted in the renaming of existing services, e.g. the EC trains between Germany and Denmark.

On 29 July 1991, the European Community decided to reorganise the legal structure of the railways in order to stimulate commercial operation and reduce government subsidies. The directive, in force in 1993, stated that railway services and infrastructure should be split and operators should be able to offer their services everywhere in Europe using the national infrastructure. After 20 years the implementation is still ongoing, but it has affected the railway operators already. High-speed services that have been introduced subsequently, using both new rolling stock and some newly built line sections, have all used brand names that are applied to all trains of their class or category, rather than naming every single service. As a consequence of this trend, the named EC trains on the Paris–Brussels–Amsterdam route disappeared in 1995–96, replaced by unnamed TGV trains and later by Thalys service. Between the Netherlands and Germany the Intercity-Express (ICE) was introduced in 2000, resulting in the near disappearance of the EuroCity brand on those train routes, and with it the use of train names. For marketing reasons, the four EuroCity services between Germany and Poland were advertised as the Berlin–Warszawa Express effective 29 September 2002, thus marketing a product instead of naming individual trains. Preparations for privatisation of Deutsche Bahn led to the discontinuation of names for the EuroCity services in Allgäu on 15 December 2002, and for the other German-operated EC trains on 12 December 2004. The French–Swiss TGV services lost their individual names on 17 May 2003, when "Lyria" was chosen as the brand name used collectively for those TGVs. After the collapse of Cisalpino on 13 December 2009, the named trains between Italy and Switzerland disappeared as well. Farther east, all EC services continue to carry names.

Network[edit]

The initial EuroCity network, 1987
EuroCity network at the end of 2010

On 31 May 1987 the EuroCity network started with 64 EuroCity trains, serving 200 cities in 13 countries.[2][6] They were made up of 56 day services and eight night services. The network included the international TGVs between France and Switzerland, shown in orange on the 1987 map. Night services are shown in blue on the map, with the exception of the boat-train Benjamin Britten (London–Amsterdam), whose overnight portion was by ferry, not by train. The other EuroCity trains are shown in green on the map. The TEE Gottardo is shown in red on the map, because it was converted to EuroCity only one year later. Three international InterCity trains did not qualify as EuroCity and are shown on the map in grey.

The network was set up by the national railways of Norway, Sweden, Austria, Switzerland and the European Community. One year later Hungary joined as well. The network grew from 64 services in 1987 to 76 services in 1990, and in 1991 the frequency was improved, resulting in an expansion to 102 services by 1991. Until then it was a mainly West European network but from 1991 it began expanding beyond Hungary in the east. After the historic developments occurring in Central and Eastern Europe around that time, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia became part of the system in 1991, and Poland in 1992. In the following years Czechoslovakia and later Yugoslavia were split and their parts became individual members too. In 1993 the night services were rebranded as the EuroNight network, the start of a gradual decline in the number of EuroCity trains in Western Europe. When high-speed lines opened in France, Italy, Spain, Germany and Benelux, the EuroCity services were replaced by high-speed trains, mostly with their own brands and therefore not classified as EuroCity. In Central and Eastern Europe more services were introduced, and over a period of 25 years the centre of the EC network had shifted east.

Operation[edit]

During the pre-Schengen era, passport checks were conducted on EC trains while in motion, rather than while parked at a station or requiring the passengers to disembark, as was sometimes the case for non-EC trains. A few require pre-reservation (though this is possible and recommended for all other trains) and in some countries a supplemental charge.

List of EuroCity services[edit]

Data[7][8][9] at the time of introduction of a particular named train. Details such as renumberings and route changes are in the articles, where existing, for each specific train. For an all-time list of EC services, see List of EuroCity services.

Train number Name Route Rolling stock Introduced Removed
EC 230,231/233 Absalon Copenhagen – Puttgarden – Hamburg DSB 1 June 2001 14 December 2002
EC 67,66 Admiraal de Ruijter Amsterdam – Hook of Holland – Harwich – London NS/BR 31 May 1987
EC 314, 315 Agram Zagreb – Ljubljana – Jesenice – Villach Hbf – Salzburg Hbf 15 December 2002
EC 166,167 Albert Einstein Prague – Furth im Wald – Lindau – Bern – Interlaken ČD 23 May 1993 14 December 2002
EC 9242,9247 Alexandre Dumas Paris – Turin – Milan SNCF 29 September 1996 13 December 2009
EC 46, 47 Alexander von Humboldt Berlin – Hannover – Cologne – Brussels DB 23 May 1993 23 May 1998
EC 390,391 Alfred Nobel Hamburg-Altona – Puttgarden – Stockholm/Oslo DB 31 May 1987 30 May 1992
EC 174,175 Alois Negrelli Prague – Schöna – Hamburg-Altona ČD 28 May 2000
EC 18,19 Andreas Hofer Innsbruck – Kufstein – Dortmund DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 92,93 Angelika Kauffmann Munich – Lindau – Zurich DB 23 May 1993 14 December 2002
EC 128,129 Anton Bruckner Linz – Passau – Hamburg-Altona DB 2 June 1991 22 May 1993
EC 70, 71 Antonín Dvořák Vienna Südbahnhof – Břeclav – Brno – Pardubice – Prague
EC 114, 115 Arbalète Zurich – Basel – Paris-Est SNCF 31 May 1987 28 September 1997
EC 344, 345 Avala Belgrade – Budapest – Štúrovo – Bratislava – Brno – Prague
EC 293, 294 Balkan Express Belgrade – Niš – Sofia – Istanbul
EC 84,85 Barbarossa Milan – Chiasso – Schaffhausen – Stuttgart 31 May 1987 29 May 1988
EC 475, 477 Barcelona Talgo Barcelona – Toulouse – Les Aubrais – Paris-Austerlitz RENFE 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 62,63 Bartók Béla Munich – Salzburg – Budapest Keleti MÁV 2 June 1991
EC 98,99 Bavaria Zurich HB – Lindau – Munich DB 31 May 1987 14 December 2002
EC 63,62 Benjamin Britten London – Harwich – Hook of Holland – Amsterdam NS/BR 31 May 1987
EC 340,341 Beograd Vienna – Budapest – Novi Sad – Belgrade
EC 40, 41
EC 44, 45
EC 46,47
Berlin-Warszawa Express Warsaw Wschodnia – Kutno – Poznan – Frankfurt (Oder) – Berlin Hbf PKP Intercity/DB 31 May 2002
EC 48, 49 Berlin-Warszawa Express Poznan – Frankfurt (Oder) – Berlin Hbf PKP Intercity/DB 31 May 2002
EC 104,105 Berner Oberland Amsterdam – Basel – Interlaken SBB 2 June 1991
EC 42,43 Berolina Warsaw – Frankfurt Oder – Berlin DR 31 May 1992 30 May 2002
EC 188,189 Bertel Thorvaldsen Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 31 May 1992 14 December 2002
EC 20,21 Blauer Enzian Klagenfurt – Salzburg – Dortmund DB 31 May 1987 14 December 2002
EC 141,152 Bonifacius Amsterdam – Emmerich – Cologne DB 2 June 1991 31 October 2000
EC 123, 124 Borromeo Geneva – Brig – Milan Central CIS
EC 83, 86 Brabant Paris Gare du Nord – Brussels SNCF 31 May 1987 23 May 1993
EC 107, 198 Brianza Bellinzona – Como – Milan Central CIS
Bulgaria Moscow – Kiev – Bucharest – Sofia/Varna/Burgas
EC 382,383 Canaletto Schaffhausen – Zurich HB – Milan – Venice CIS 13 June 2004
EC 178,179 Carl Maria von Weber Prague – Schöna – Hamburg ČD 29 May 1994
Carlo Goldoni Venice – Ljubljana – Zagreb – Budapest FS 10 June 2001 9 December 2006
EC 4,5 Carlo Magno Sestri Levante – Basel – Dortmund DB 31 May 1987 30 May 1992
EC 50, 51 Casanova Ljubljana – Villa Opicina – Venice Santa Lucia 15 December 2003 31 March 2008
EC 9240,9249 Caravaggio Milan Central – Paris SNCF 15 December 2003
EC 70,71 Catalan Talgo Barcelona – Narbonne – Montpellier – Avignon – Valence – Grenoble – Chambéry – Geneva RENFE 31 May 1987
EC 22,29 Champs Elysees (TGV) Lausanne – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 80,181 Christian Morgenstern Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 31 May 1992 14 December 2002
EC 355, 354 Cinque Terre Schaffhausen – Zurich HB – Milan – Genova – Livorno CIS 13 June 2004 14 December 2008
EC 26,23 Cisalpin (TGV) Lausanne – Paris / Geneva – Milan Central SNCF/SBB 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 246,247 Citadella Budapest – Székesfehérvár – Zalaegerszeg – Murska Sobota – Ljubljana
EC 70,71 Colosseum Rome Termini – Basel – Frankfurt am Main DB 28 May 1989 1 June 1991
EC 170,171 Comenius Prague – Schöna – Berlin ČD 23 May 1993 27 May 2000
Corona Budapest – Oradea – Cluj-Napoca – Brașov CFR
EC 158,159 Croatia Zagreb – Graz – Vienna
Dacia Vienna – Győr – Budapest – Szolnok – Arad – Sighişoara – Brașov – Bucharest CFR
EC 220,221 Detvan Ostrava – Zvolen CD 10 December 2006
EC 52,53 Drava Venice – Ljubljana – Zagreb – Budapest
OEC 150, 151 Emona Ljubljana – Maribor – Graz Hbf – Bruck a. d. Mur – Kapfenberg – Vienna Südbahnhof ÖBB
EC 24,25 Erasmus Amsterdam – Emmerich – Kufstein – Innsbruck DB 31 May 1987 27 May 2000
EC 87, 82 Étoile du Nord Paris Gare du Nord – Brussels – Antwerpen-Berchem – Rotterdam CS – Den Haag HS – Amsterdam CS SNCF 31 May 1987 22 January 1995
EC 126,127 Fatra Žilina – Prague
EC 36, 37 Felix Timmermans Cologne Hbf – Aachen – Liège – Brussels DB 23 May 1993 23 May 1998 3
EC 26,27 Frans Hals Amsterdam – Emmerich – Munich DB 31 May 1987 31 October 2000
EC 20,21 Franz Liszt Budapest – Passau – Dortmund DB 28 May 1989 13 December 2003
EC 64, 65 Franz Schubert Zurich – Innsbruck – Vienna 31 May 1987
EC 144/145, 146,147 Frejus Lyon – Modane – Torino FS 29 September 1996 14 December 2003
EC 223,222 Galilei Paris – Lausanne – Brig – Milan – Venice / Florence SNCF 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 80,81 Garda Verona Porta Nuova – Bolzano/Bozen – Innsbruck – Kufstein – Munich Hbf FS 2 June 1991
EC 56,57 Goethe Paris Est – Saarbrücken – Frankfurt am Main DB 31 May 1987 13 December 2003
EC 57,58 Gottardo Zürich Flughafen (or Basel SBB) – Milan Central SBB 25 September 1988 7 August 1994
EC 96,97 Gottfried Keller Munich – Lindau – Zurich SBB 31 May 1987 14 December 2002
EC 188, 189 Grödnertal /
Val Gardena
Verona Porta Nuova – Bolzano/Bozen – Innsbruck – Munich Hbf FS 28 May 2000 14 December 2002
EC 78, 79 Gustav Klimt Graz – Vienna – Brno – Prague
EC 70, 71 Gustav Mahler Vienna – Brno – Prague
EC 42,43 Gustave Eiffel Cologne – Brussels – Paris Nord SNCF 31 May 1987 13 December 2003
EC 194,195 Hamlet Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 34,35 Hansa Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 31 May 1987 1 June 1991
EC 74,75 Havelland Zurich – Basel – Berlin DB 31 May 1992 22 May 1993
EC 58,59 Heinrich Heine Paris Est – Saarbrücken – Frankfurt am Main SNCF 28 May 1989 13 December 2003
EC 78,79 Helvetia Hamburg – Basel – Zurich DB 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 974,977 Henri Dunant (TGV) Geneva – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 82,83 Hermann Hesse Chiasso – Schaffhausen – Stuttgart SBB 31 May 1987 27 May 1989
EC 140,153 Hieronymus Bosch Cologne – Emmerich – Amsterdam DB 2 June 1991 31 October 2000
EC 536,537 Hornád Budapest – Miskolc – Košice MÁV
EC 128,129 Hradčany Žilina – Prague
EC 110,111 Hugo von Hofmannsthal Klagenfurt – Salzburg – Stuttgart DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 146,147 Hukvaldy
EC 174,175 Hungaria Budapest – Bratislava - Brno - Prague – Berlin Hbf. ČD 23 May 1993
EC 80, 85 Ile de France Paris Gare du Nord – St. Quentin – Brussels – Antwerpen-Berchem – Rotterdam – Den Haag HS – Amsterdam CS SNCF/SNCB-NMBS 31 May 1987 23 May 1993
EC 179 Insubria Zurich HB – Arth-Goldau – Bellinzona – Lugano – Milan Central CIS
EC 96, 97 Iris Chur – Zurich – Basel – Strasbourg – Luxembourg – Brussels SBB/SNCB-NMBS 31 May 1987
Ister Budapest - Szolnok – Arad – Brașov – Bucharest CFR
EC 38, 39 Jacques Brel Dortmund – Essen – Düsseldorf – Cologne – Liège – Brussels – St. Quentin – Paris-Nord DB 23 May 1993 xx.05.1996
EC 168,169 Jan Hus Prague – Schöna – Dresden DB 28 May 2000 31 May 2001
EC 148,149 Jan Perner Prague-Bohumin-Žilina
EC 142,151 Jan Pietersz Sweelinck Amsterdam – Emmerich – Cologne DB 2 June 1991 31 October 2000
EC 272,273 Jaroslav Hasek Budapest – Štúrovo – Bratislava –Brno – Prague
EC 295, 296 Jean Monnet Brussels – Luxembourg – Strasbourg – Mulhouse Ville – Basel SNCF SNCF/SNCB-NMBS 30 May 1999 10 December 2011
EC 174,175 Jeszensky János Budapest – Bratislava - Brno -Prague - Ústí nad Labem – Dresden – Berlin – Hamburg MÁV
EC 972,979 J.J. Rousseau (TGV) Geneva – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 72, 73 Johann Gregor Mendel Vienna Hbf. – Hohenau – Břeclav – Brno hl.n. – Pardubice hl.n. – Prague hl.n.
EC 28,29 Johann Strauss Vienna – Passau – Cologne ÖBB 31 May 1987 13 December 2003
EC 120,121 Johannes Kepler Linz – Passau – Frankfurt am Main ÖBB 2 June 1991 28 May 1994
EC 177,178 Johannes Brahms Berlin – Prague – Vienna
EC 144,149 Johannes Vermeer Amsterdam – Emmerich – Cologne DB 2 June 1991 31 October 2000
EC 26,27 Joseph Haydn Vienna – Passau – Hamburg DB 2 June 1991 13 December 2003
EC 100, 101 Jože Plečnik Ljubljana – Maribor – Graz – Linz – Summerau – České Budějovice - Tábor – Prague 11 December 2005 13 December 2009
EC 164, 165 Kaiserin Elisabeth Zurich – Innsbruck – Salzburg ÖBB 30 May 1999 12 December 2009
EC 62, 63 Kálmán Imre Budapest-Keleti – Vienna Westbahnhof – Linz – Salzburg – Munich Hbf
EC 192,193 Karen Blixen Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 50,51 Karlštejn/Karlstein Prague - Karlštejn - Plzeň – Cheb – Dortmund ČD 29 May 1994
EC 80,81 Karwendel Innsbruck – Mittenwald – Hamburg 31 May 1987 28 May 1988
EC 154,155 Killesberg Stuttgart – Zurich HB SBB 23 May 1993 7 August 1994
EC 470,471 Komet Basel – Hamburg DB 31 May 1987 1 June 1991
Körös Budapest – Szolnok – Arad – Timişoara CFR
EC 120,121 Košican Košice – Žilina – Púchov – Olomouc – Česká Třebová - Pardubice - Prague
EC 143, 230 Kysuca Prague - Olomouc – Ostrava – Žilina
EC 144,145 Landek
EC 105 Lario Biasca – Chiasso – Milan
EC Lehár MÁV 29 May 1988
EC 980,971 Le Genevois (TGV) Geneva – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 113,116 Le Corbusier Basel – Paris 31 May 1987
Le Mosellan Parijs – Luxembourg
EC 28,29 Lemano (TGV) Lausanne – Paris / Lausanne – Milan Central SNCF/SBB 31 May 1987
EC 10,11 Leonardo da Vinci Milan – Brenner – Kufstein – Dortmund DB 31 May 1987
EC 240,241 Leoš Janácek
EC 141/142, 147/148 Ligure Nice Ville – Monaco-Monte-Carlo – Ventimiglia – San Remo – Genova Piazza Principe – Milan Central FS 12 September 2004 13 December 2009
EC 6,7 Lötschberg Brig – Basel – Hannover DB 31 May 1987
EC 24,21 Lutetia (TGV) Lausanne – Paris / Milan – Geneva SNCF/SBB 31 May 1987
EC 407, 409 Madrid Talgo Madrid – Bordeaux – Les Aubrais – Paris-Austerlitz RENFE 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
Maestral Budapest – Székesfehérvár – Zagreb
EC 50,51 Manzoni Milan Central – Winterthur SBB 28 May 1989 22 May 1993
EC 60, 61 Maria Theresia Zurich – Innsbruck – Vienna ÖBB 31 May 1987 12 December 2009
EC 68,69 Marie Curie Stuttgart – Strasbourg – Paris DB 31 May 1992 xx.05.1996
EC 72,73 Matterhorn Brig – Basel – Frankfurt DB 28 May 1990
EC 66,67 Maurice Ravel Munich – Strasbourg – Paris Est SNCF 28 May 1989 13 December 2003
EC 16,17 Max Reinhardt Vienna – Salzburg – Münster (Westfalen) DB 23 May 1993 14 December 2002
EC 115, 116 Mediolanum Basel SBB – Lucerne – Lugano – Como – Milan Central CIS
EC 48,49 Memling Cologne – Aachen – Oostende SNCB-NMBS 31 May 1987 23 May 1998
EC 30,31 Merkur Copenhagen – Puttgarden – Frankfurt am Main DB 31 May 1987 1 June 1991
EC 80,81 Michelangelo Rome Termini – Brenner – Kufstein – Munich FS 29 May 1988
EC 10,11 Mimara Zagreb – Salzburg – Munich 2 June 1991
EC 40,41 Molière Dortmund – Aachen – Paris Nord DB 31 May 1987 13 December 1997
EC 140/141, 142/143 Monginevro Lyon – Modane – Turin FS 29 September 1996 14 December 2003
EC 76,77 Mont Blanc Geneva – Basel – Hamburg Altona DB 31 May 1987 31 May 2001
EC 177 Monte Ceneri Zurich HB – Lugano – Como – Milan Central CIS
EC 136/137, 138/139 Mont Cenis Lyon – Modane – Turin – Milan FS 29 September 1996 14 December 2003
EC 124, 129 Monte Rosa Geneva – Lausanne – Brig – Milan Central CIS 12 December 2004
EC 39,40 Monteverdi Geneva – Lausanne – Brig – Milan Central – Verona – Venice SBB 31 May 1987
EC 130,131 Moravia Budapest – Stúrvo – Bratislava – Ostrava
EC 68,69 Mozart Vienna Westbahnhof – Linz – Salzburg – Munich Hbf – Strasbourg – Paris Est ÖBB 28 May 1989 13 December 2003
Nikola Tesla Belgrade – Zagreb – Venice
EC 142,143 Odra Prague – Ostrava – Žilina
EC 147 Olše Prague – Žilina
Olympus Belgrade – Niš – Skopje – Thessaloniki
EC 72,73 Otto Lilienthal Zurich – Basel – Berlin DB 2 June 1991 22 May 1993
EC 44,45 Paderewski Warsaw – Frankfurt/Oder – Berlin Zoo PKP 1 June 2001 30 May 2002
EC 12,13 Paganini Bologna – Brenner – Kufstein – Dortmund DB 2 June 1991
EC 213,212 Palatino Paris – Chambéry – Genova – Rome SNCF 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 44,45 Parsifal Paris Nord – Aachen – Cologne DB 31 May 1987 14 December 1997
EC 14,15 Patscherkofel Innsbruck – Kufstein – Saarbrücken DB 23 May 1993 27 May 1995
Pau Casals Barcelona - Geneva - Berne RENFE 28 May 1989 22 May 1993
Pestalozzi Innsbruck - Zürich 29 May 1988
Petrov Brno - Bratislava - Budapest MÁV 9 December 2012
EC 146,147 Piet Mondriaan Amsterdam – Emmerich – Cologne DB 2 June 1991 31 October 2000
EC 102,103 Polonia Vienna – Warsaw 1 June 1997
EC 176,177 Porta Bohemica Prague – Schöna – Hamburg ČD 23 May 1993
EC 48,49 Posnania Poznan – Frankfurt/Oder – Berlin Zoo PKP 1 June 2001 2 June 2002
EC 106,107 Praha Warsaw – Prague PKP 23 May 1993
Prietenia Bucharest – Iaşi – Chişinău
EC 90,91 Prinz Eugen Vienna – Passau – Hamburg DB 31 May 1987 23 May 1998
EC Raffaello Rome – Florence – Bologna – Milan – Zurich FS
EC 532,533 Rákóczi Budapest – Miskolc – Kosice MÁV
EC 70,71 Rätia Chur – Basel – Hamburg DB 31 May 1987
EC 2,3 Rembrandt Chur – Basel – Emmerich – Amsterdam DB 31 May 1987 13 December 2003
EC 8,9 Rheinpfeil Chur – Basel – Hannover DB 31 May 1987 1 June 1991
EC 139/140, 159/160 Riviera Dei Fiori Nice – Monaco Monte-Carlo – San Remo – Genova – Milan Central FS 13 December 2009
EC 203/209 Robert Schuman Paris – Luxembourg CFL 31 May 1987
EC 16,17 Robert Stolz Graz – Salzburg – Munich ÖBB 28 May 1989 1 June 1991
EC 37,30 Romulus Rome – Florence – Venice – Klagenfurt – Vienna FS 31 May 1987 9 June 2001
EC 186,187 Rosenborg Copenhagen – Puttgarden – Hamburg DB 31 May 1992 28 May 1995
EC 60,61 Rosenkavalier Vienna – Salzburg – Munich ÖBB 2 June 1991 28 May 1995
EC 53,56 Rossini Schaffhausen – Zurich – Milan 31 May 1987
EC 81, 84 Rubens Paris Gare du Nord – Bruxelles-Midi SNCB-NMBS/SNCF 31 May 1987 23 May 1993
EC 111, 114 San Marco Basel SBB – Lucerne – Bellinzona – Lugano – Milan Central – Brescia – Verona – Venice CIS 11 December 2005
EC 143/144, 145/146 Sanremo Nice – Monaco-Monte-Carlo – San Remo – Savona – Genova – Milan Central FS 13 December 2009
EC 111–211, 210–110 Sava Munich – Villach – Ljubljana – Zagreb – Belgrade
EC 86,87 Schwabenland Zurich – Schaffhausen – Stuttgart SBB 31 May 1987 28 May 1989
EC 92,93 Schweizerland Zurich – Lindau – Munich SBB 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 32,33 Skandinavien Copenhagen – Puttgarden – Hamburg DB 31 May 1987 1 June 1991
EC 274,275 Slovan Budapest- Bratislava – Prague
EC 277,278 Slovenská Strela Bratislava-Břeclav
EC 278, 279 Smetana Vienna Südbahnhof – Břeclav – Brno – Pardubice – Prague – Dresden ČD 15 December 2002 13 December 2003
EC 104,105 Sobieski Vienna – Warsaw PKP 23 May 1993
EC 184,185 Sören Kierkegaard Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 31 May 1992 28 May 1994
EC 66,67 Stachus Vienna – Salzburg – Munich ÖBB 31 May 1987 22 May 1993
EC 220,221 Stendhal Paris – Turin – Milan SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 32, 33 Stradivari Venice – Udine – Villach – Klagenfurt – Bruck an der Mur – Vienna Südbahnhof 14 December 2004
EC 171, 178 Cisalpino Teodolina Zurich HB – Bellinzona – Lugano – Como – Milan Central CIS
EC 190,191 Thomas Mann Hamburg – Puttgarden – Copenhagen DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 108,109 Thunersee Interlaken – Basel – Berlin 2 June 1991 27 May 1995
EC 109,110 Ticino Basel – Chiasso – Milan
EC 86,87 Tiepolo Venice – Brenner – Kufstein – Munich FS 28 May 1995
Tisza Budapest – Szolnok – Debrecen – Nyíregyháza – Lviv – Kiev – Moscow
EC 74,75 Tiziano Milan – Basel – Hamburg DB 31 May 1987 14 December 2002
EC 46,47 Traianus Budapest – Bucharest 1 June 1997 14 December 2002
EC 62, 63 Transalpin Vienna Westbf – Linz – Salzburg – Wörgl – Innsbruck – Bludenz – Feldkirch – Zurich HB – Basel SBB ÖBB / SBB 31 May 1987 14 June 2010
EC 158,159 Uetliberg Zurich HB – Stuttgart SBB 23 May 1993 7 August 1994
EC Val d'Ossola Milan – Brig – Lötschberg – Basel SBB CIS 14 December 2002
EC 127, 120 Vallese Geneva – Lausanne – Brig – Milan Central CIS
EC 40,41 Varsovia Warsaw – Frankfurt/Oder – Berlin DB 23 May 1993 30 May 2002
EC 90, 91 Vauban Interlaken – Thun – Bern – Olten – Basel – Mulhouse – Strasbourg – Luxembourg – Brussels SBB/SNCB-NMBS 29 May 1988
EC 130,133 Verbano Milan – Brig – Lötschberg – Basel SBB
EC 4,5 Verdi Milan – Basel – Dortmund DB 2 June 1991 14 December 2002
EC 978,975 Versailles (TGV) Geneva – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 52,53 Victor Hugo Frankfurt am Main – Saarbrücken – Paris Est DB 31 May 1987 27 May 1995
EC 172,173 Vindobona Vienna – Schöna – Berlin ÖBB 23 May 1993
EC 976,973 Voltaire (TGV) Geneva – Paris SNCF 31 May 1987
EC 248,249 Wawel Kraków – Katowice – Wrocław – Berlin – Hamburg 10 December 2006
EC 14,15 Wörthersee Klagenfurt – Salzburg – Kiel DB 28 May 1989
OEC 156, 157 Zagreb Zagreb – Maribor – Leibnitz – Graz – Bruck an der Mur – Vienna Südbahnhof ÖBB

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Schulz, Hans; Basler, Otto; Strauss, Gerhard (eds) (2004). Deutsches Fremdwörterbuch: in 12 Bänden [German Book of Foreign Words: in 12 Volumes]. 5: Eau De Cologne - Futurismus. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. p. 317. ISBN 3110180219.  (German)
  2. ^ a b c Saltzman, Marvin L. (March 6, 1988). "INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL : Europe's Trains on a Roll in Price Competition". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Haas, Hans-Dieter; Eschlbeck, Daniela (eds) (2006). Internationale Wirtschaft: Rahmenbedingungen, Akteure, räumliche Prozesse [International Business: Environment, Actors, Spatial Processes]. München: Oldenbourg Verlag. p. 307. ISBN 3486579436.  (German)
  4. ^ "International Services from May 23" (changes taking effect). Thomas Cook European Timetable (May 1–22, 1993 edition), p. 3. Peterborough, UK: Thomas Cook Publishing.
  5. ^ M. Mertens and J.P. Malaspina (2007). La légende des Trans Europ Express, p. 130. Vannes.
  6. ^ Das grosse TEE Buch p. 131
  7. ^ Deutsche Bahn, Ihr Zugbegleiter/Ihr Reiseplan, Editions 1987 up to 2007
  8. ^ Thomas Cook Continental Timetable, May 31–June 30, 1987 edition.
  9. ^ M. Mertens and J.P. Malaspina, La légende des Trans Europ Express, Vannes 2007

Further reading[edit]

  • Brunhouse, Jay (17 May 1987). "The New Age Dawns on Train Travel in Europe". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
  • Malaspina, Jean-Pierre (2005). Intercity, Eurocity, EURegio, EuroNight, City Night Line, Auto-trains. Trains d'Europe 2. Paris: La Vie du Rail. ISBN 2915034494.  (French)
  • Rufer, Fritz (1993). Die neuen Eurocity-Wagen der SBB: Wechsel im RIC-Wagenpark der SBB [The New SBB-CFF-FFS EuroCity Coaches: Transition in the SBB-CFF-FFS Coach Fleet]. Münchenbuchsee: Fritz Rufer. OCLC 600897699.  (German)
  • Trautsamwieser, Herbert (1998). Vom Dampfwagen zum EuroCity: 160 Jahre Eisenbahn in Österreich, 160 Jahre Menschen im Zug [From Steam Engines to EuroCity: 160 Years of Railways in Austria, 160 Years of People by Train]. Krems: Malek. ISBN 3901207228.  (German)
  • EC-Verkehr - 1987 bis heute der EuroCity-Verkehr bei der DB, der Deutschen Bahn AG, den ÖBB und der SBB [EC-Traffic - 1987 to today the EuroCity-Traffic on the DB, the Deutsche Bahn AG, the ÖBB and the SBB-CFF-FFS]. BahnProfil 23. Berlin: adk. 2001. OCLC 76217533.  (German)
  • EuroCity: Qualität der Bahn [EuroCity: Quality of the Rails]. Bahn-Akzente. Frankfurt/M: Deutsche Bundesbahn. 1987. OCLC 315382922.  (German)
  • Fernreise-System Bahn: Informationen zu InterCityExpress, InterCity, EuroCity und deren Vernetzung [Long Distance Rail Travel System: Information about InterCityExpress, InterCity, EuroCity and their Networking]. Reisen mit der Bahn. Mainz: Deutsche Bundesbahn; Deutsche Reichsbahn. 1992. OCLC 311761936.  (German)

External links[edit]

Media related to EuroCity at Wikimedia Commons