Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington
Washington presidential library logo.jpg
Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington is located in Virginia
Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington
Shown within Virginia
Location 38°42′47″N 77°5′17″W / 38.71306°N 77.08806°W / 38.71306; -77.08806Coordinates: 38°42′47″N 77°5′17″W / 38.71306°N 77.08806°W / 38.71306; -77.08806
Fairfax County, Virginia, USA
Construction start 2010
Dedicated 27 September 2013
Named for Fred W. Smith
Size 45,000 square feet
Cost $106.4 million
Management Douglas Bradburn
Website http://www.mountvernon.org/library

The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon is the presidential library of George Washington, the first president of the United States.[1] Located at Washington's home in Mount Vernon, Virginia, the library was built by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association and is privately funded.[2] It is named for the chairman of the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation which donated $38 million to the project.[3] The library officially opened 27 September 2013.[4]

Description[edit]

The new library is a 45,000 square feet in a three story building located on a 15 acre plot of land across the street from Mount Vernon's main entrance.[5] The general library contains thousands of books, newspapers, pamphlets, microforms, electronic resources, maps, photographs, and periodicals as several vaults containing 105 volumes which belonged to Washington.[6] These materials cover a variety of topics including George Washington, Martha Washington, Mount Vernon, the American Revolution, Colonial America, slavery, the Early Republic, and historical preservation.[7] The library's special collections include rare books, documents, letters, farm books, and maps that pertain to Washington, his presidency, and family life.[8] This collection also contains 103 books that once were part of Washington's collection in his home at Mount Vernon.[9] The books are only a small portion of the Washington's 900 title and 1,200 volume collection.[10] The rest of this large collection was given to family members or sold in 1848 to bookseller Henry Stevens.[11] The new library also contains high-tech meeting rooms that will allow for lectures, conferences, and other meetings.[12] The new Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington also has a large oval vault. This vault contains a six-foot pewter bas relief representation of Washington's bookplate that depicts the Washington family crest.[13] The library is available to researchers by appointment only, but the library's material cannot be checked out.[14]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steph Solis (3 September 2013). "George Washington presidential library to open Sept. 27". USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/12/george-washington-presidential-library/2510295/
  2. ^ Steph Solis (3 September 2013). "George Washington presidential library to open Sept. 27". USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/12/george-washington-presidential-library/2510295/
  3. ^ Steph Solis (3 September 2013). "George Washington presidential library to open Sept. 27". USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/12/george-washington-presidential-library/2510295/
  4. ^ Steph Solis (3 September 2013). "George Washington presidential library to open Sept. 27". USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/12/george-washington-presidential-library/2510295/
  5. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  6. ^ George Washington 's Mount Vernon. (2014). "Library FAQs." Mount Vernon Ladies Association. Retrieved from http://www.mountvernon.org/library/faqs
  7. ^ George Washington 's Mount Vernon. (2014). "Library FAQs." Mount Vernon Ladies Association. Retrieved from http://www.mountvernon.org/library/faqs
  8. ^ George Washington 's Mount Vernon. (2014). "Library FAQs." Mount Vernon Ladies Association. Retrieved from http://www.mountvernon.org/library/faqs
  9. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  10. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  11. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  12. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  13. ^ Klein, C. (2013). “Mount Vernon Opens New George Washington Presidential Library.” A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/news/mount-vernon-opens-new-george-washington-presidential-library
  14. ^ George Washington 's Mount Vernon. (2014). "Library FAQs." Mount Vernon Ladies Association. Retrieved from http://www.mountvernon.org/library/faqs