Frode Johnsen

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Frode Johnsen
Frode Johnsen Nadderud.jpg
Johnsen with Rosenborg in 2006
Personal information
Date of birth (1974-03-17) 17 March 1974 (age 40)
Place of birth Skien, Norway
Height 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Odd
Number 11
Youth career
Skotfoss TIF
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–2000 Odd 97 (25)
2000–2006 Rosenborg 145 (80)
2006–2008 Nagoya Grampus 78 (35)
2009–2010 Shimizu S-Pulse 62 (18)
2011– Odd 102 (30)
National team
2000–2013 Norway 35 (10)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 17 August 2014.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 24 January 2013

Frode Johnsen (born 17 March 1974 in Skotfoss, Skien) is a Norwegian footballer who plays for Odd. He can play in several positions, but preferably as a striker or midfielder. Johnsen is 188 cm tall, and is a good header of the ball. He left Nagoya Grampus to join Shimizu for the 2009 season.[1]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

Johnsen began his career with minnows Skotfoss TIF, but did not make his Tippeligaen debut until a switch to Odd Grenland where he made his debut in the Norwegian Premier League in 1999 at the age of 25.

Rosenborg[edit]

2000[edit]

He was transferred to Rosenborg mid-season in 2000, as a replacement for John Carew. Johnsen previously studied to be a police officer during his time in Odd Grenland, but quit school to play for Rosenborg. He played fifteen games for Rosenborg in his first season, scoring 9 goals – 12 in total, as he scored 3 goals for Odd before the switch [1]. His new club and he won the championship. Rosenborg narrowly missed out on qualifying from the group stage of the Champions League. Johnsen did very well, scoring five goals in six games – including a hat-trick against Helsingborg. As they finished third, they advanced to the UEFA Cup where they crashed out in the first round to Alavés, Johnsen scored the goal in the 1–1 away leg, but could not prevent Rosenborg from losing 3–1 at home.

2001[edit]

In his first full season he became joint top-scorer with 17 goals (shared with Thorstein Helstad and Clayton Zane), playing in all games but one. Rosenborg won the league again by a single point ahead of Lillestrøm. In the Champions League Rosenborg finished fourth in their group. Johnsen played in all six games but one and did not score any goals, though he netted one in the qualifiers.

2002[edit]

Johnsen won his third championship in a row in 2002. He only played in 17 out of 26 games due to injury, scoring 7 goals. In the Champions League he scored twice in the qualification round, but did not score any in the group stages as Rosenborg only got four points and finished last, despite losing only two games.

2003[edit]

He was involved in every game in the 2003 season as Rosenborg cruised through the championship, winning by 14 points. Johnsen scored 15 goals, only beaten with two by team-mate Harald Brattbakk. He also won the cup with Rosenborg over Bodø/Glimt, scoring the equaliser as Rosenborg eventually won 3–1. He was the top scorer of the cup, scoring 11 goals in 7 games. In the Champions League, Rosenborg and Johnsen failed to reach the group stage, losing narrowly to Deportivo in the qualifiers. They still got to play UEFA Cup, and had a good run before losing on away goals to Benfica. Johnsen played in all but one game in Europe this season, scoring 2 goals in 9 games.

2004[edit]

The 2004 season was dramatic and very memorable season for Frode Johnsen. Rosenborg fought with Vålerenga for the championship, and before the last game of the season, Rosenborg was in the lead, but only on more scored goals. 7 minutes from time in Rosenborgs game against FC Lyn, Vålerenga made it 3–0 in their league game. Rosenborg was leading 3–1 at the time and needed one more to win the league, and in stoppage time Frode Johnsen scored his third of the game with a diving header, winning the championship [2]. Johnsen played in all game and was named top scorer that year, notching up 19 goals in the process. He did not score as many in Europe, but nevertheless, Rosenborg was back in the Champions League. Only two points this time, and Johnsen scored 2 goals in total (w/ Q-rounds).

2005[edit]

After winning five championships in a row, the 2005 season was a devastating one as his team only finished 7th. Johnsen scored only 7 goals in his 23 games that season. In 2005, both RCD Mallorca and AC Sparta Prague were interested in signing Johnsen, but nothing happened. He was involved in all Champions League games, but did not score. They finished third in a group which contained Real Madrid, Lyon and Olympiacos, but was eliminated in the first UEFA Cup round against FC Zenit St. Petersburg.

2006[edit]

Frode Johnsen started the season well, and halfway through the season he had scored 6 goals in 13 games before Nagoya Grampus Eight came knocking. Johnsen could not resist the chance of going to play abroad and after serving Rosenborg faithfully for a number of years, they let him go and sold him in July 2006.

In all competitions, Johnsen played 234 games and scored 125 goals for Rosenborg.

Nagoya Grampus Eight[edit]

He signed an 18-month contract and started his Nagoya career by scoring twice in an away match against JEF Chiba on 29 July 2006. Nagoya won the match 3–2. He scored eight more times finishing with 10 goals in 18 games as Nagoya Grampus finished in 7th place.

In his first full season in 2007, Nagoya only managed an 11th place. He scored 13 goals in 26 games.

In 2008, Johnsen and Nagoya fought for the J. League championship until the final day, but ended up in third place, qualifying for an Asian Champions league spot.

On 28 October 2008, Frode Johnsen stated that he would stay in Japan for at least one more year, either for Nagoya or another Japanese club.[2]

Shimizu S-Pulse[edit]

On 18 November 2008, Frode Johnsen announced that he would be leaving Nagoya after this season, and that he was only a medical away from securing a move to another Japanese club. He did not reveal which club it was until the 2008 season was over.[3] It was eventually known that he would join Shimizu S-Pulse for the 2009 season.

Shimizu S-Pulse finished in 7th place in his first season and five points from an AFC Champions League place, as Johnsen scored 9 league goals.

On 1 August Johnsen scored his first hat-trick in the J-League in a 6–3 win against Shonan Bellmare.

On 14 November 2010, Johnsen scored one goal in a 5–0 win against Shonan Bellmare in what will be his last league game in Japan. He has announced that he will return to Norway after this season.

International career[edit]

Frode Johnsen has 34 caps, and has scored 10 goals for the Norwegian national team.[4] He made his debut against Finland on 16 August 2000 coming on for Steffen Iversen 20 minutes from time.

His first international goal came against Wales in a 2002 FIFA World Cup qualifier. He remained a regular member of the Norway squad until 2007, but lost his place after moving to Japan. The long flight distance between Europe and Japan was cited as one of the reasons why he did not play in more games after joining Nagoya Grampus.

On 1 September 2013, Johnsen was recalled to the national team squad, more than six years after his last cap, ahead of the 2014 World Cup qualifying matches against Cyprus and Switzerland. He did not play in either match, but kept his place in the squad for the matches against Slovenia and Iceland in October 2013. In the match against Slovenia on 11 October 2013, Johnsen came on as a late substitute, becoming the oldest player ever to play for the Norwegian national team. He repeated the feat in the home match against Iceland four days later, at the age of 39 years, 212 days.

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Norway's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Result Competition Scored
1–2 2001-01-24 Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong  South Korea 3–2 Friendly match 2
3 2001-09-05 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo  Wales 3–2 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification 1
4 2004-08-18 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo  Belgium 2–2 Friendly match 1
5 2004-01-22 Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong  Sweden 3–0 Friendly match 1
6 2004-01-25 Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong  Honduras 3–1 Friendly match 1
7 2005-04-20 A. Le Coq Arena, Tallinn  Estonia 2–1 Friendly match 1
8 2005-05-24 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo  Costa Rica 1–0 Friendly match 1
9–10 2006-05-24 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo  Paraguay 2–2 Friendly match 2

Career statistics[edit]

As of 16 August 2014
Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Norway League Norwegian Cup Europe Total
1993 Odd Grenland Second Division 0 0 ? ? - - 0 0
1994 0 0 ? ? - - 0 0
1995 Adeccoligaen 8 0 ? ? - - 8 0
1996 20 3 ? ? - - 20 3
1997 24 2 ? ? - - 24 2
1998 26 7 ? ? - - 26 7
1999 Tippeligaen 25 9 5 2 - - 25 9
2000 10 3 ? ? - - 10 3
2000 Rosenborg Tippeligaen 15 9 1 0 12 6 28 15
2001 25 17 3 3 7 1 35 21
2002 17 7 3 0 8 2 28 9
2003 26 15 7 11 9 2 42 28
2004 26 19 5 6 20 7 51 32
2005 23 7 2 4 10 0 35 11
2006 13 6 2 3 - - 15 9
Japan League Emperor's Cup Asia Total
2006 Nagoya J. League Division 1 17 10 2 2 - - 19 12
2007 26 13 2 0 2 1 30 14
2008 34 12 3 2 6 2 43 16
2009 Shimizu S-Pulse J. League Division 1 33 9 4 1 8 2 45 12
2010 29 8
Norway League Norwegian Cup Europe Total
2011 Odd Tippeligaen 23 7 4 1 - - 27 8
2012 29 4 3 4 0 0 32 8
2013 30 16 4 2 0 0 34 18
2014 20 3 4 5 0 0 24 8
Total Norway 306 204 56 113
Japan 139 52 11 5 16 5 150 56
Career total

Note: Europe continental also includes Royal League (2004 season)

  • All competitions (Rosenborg):

234 matches – 125 goals

UEFA Cup: 9/2
UEFA Champions League: 47/11
Royal League: 10/5

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Rosenborg BK[5]

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.s-pulse.co.jp/news/20081223-1289.html S-Pulse news release
  2. ^ "Johnsen stays in Japan". VG Nett. 28 October 2008. 
  3. ^ "Johnsen swaps club in Japan". Nettavisen. 18 November 2008. 
  4. ^ http://www.home.no/greenriver/players/johnsen_f.html
  5. ^ "Mestvinnende" (in Norwegian). Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2 November 2009. 

External links[edit]