German Type UC II submarine

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SM U 35 Hafen.jpg
Two Type UC II submarines alongside Austro-Hungarian depot ship Amphitrite at Gjenovic, Bocche di Cattaro, in the Adriatic Sea
Class overview
Builders: AG Weser, Bremen
Blohm & Voss, Hamburg
Vulcan, Hamburg
Germaniawerft, Kiel
Operators:  Kaiserliche Marine
Preceded by: UC I
Succeeded by: UC III
Cost: 1,729,000–2,141,000 German Mark
Built: 1916–1918
In commission: 1916–1918
Building: 64
Planned: 64
Completed: 64
Lost: 46
General characteristics
Type: Coastal minelaying submarine
Displacement: 400–434 t (394–427 long tons) surfaced
480–511 t (472–503 long tons) submerged
Length: 49.35–53.15 m (161.9–174.4 ft) o/a
Beam: 5.22 m (17.1 ft)
Draught: 3.65 m (12.0 ft)
Propulsion: 2 shafts
6-cylinder diesel engines, 500–600 ihp (373–447 kW)
Siemens-Schuckert electric motors, 450–550 ihp (336–410 kW)
Speed: 11.6–11.9 knots (21.5–22.0 km/h; 13.3–13.7 mph) surfaced
6.7–7.3 knots (12.4–13.5 km/h; 7.7–8.4 mph) submerged
Range: 7,280–10,040 mi (11,720–16,160 km) at 7 kn (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) surfaced
52–60 mi (84–97 km) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 3 officers, 23 enlisted
Sensors and
processing systems:
1 periscope
Armament: 2 × 50 cm (19.7 in) external bow torpedo tubes
1 × internal stern tube (7 torpedoes)
1 × 8.8 cm (3.5 in) or 10.5 cm (4.1 in) deck gun
1 machine gun
18 × Type UC 200 mines in 6 internal chutes

Type UC II minelaying submarines were used by the Imperial German Navy during World War I. They displaced 417 tons, carried guns, 7 torpedoes and up to 18 mines. The ships were double-hulled with improved range and seakeeping compared to the UC I type.

If judged only by the numbers of enemy vessels destroyed, the UC II is the most successful submarine design in history: According to modern estimates, they sank more than 1800 enemy vessels.[1]

List of Type UC II submarines[edit]

There were 64 Type UC II submarines commissioned into the Imperial German Navy.

 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906–1922