Go Back to Where You Came From

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Go Back To Where You Came From
Directed by Ivan O'Mahoney
Presented by Dr David Corlett
Narrated by Colin Friels
Theme music composer Hans Baker
Composer(s) Gordon Wittoch
Country of origin Australia
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 6
Production
Executive producer(s) Peter Newman, John Godfrey, Michael Cordell, Nick Murray
Producer(s) Rick McPhee
Editor(s) Tomas O'Brien
Running time 60 minutes
Production company(s) Cordell Jigsaw Productions
Broadcast
Original channel SBS One
Original run 21 June 2011 (2011-06-21)  – 30 August 2012 (2012-08-30)
External links
Official website

Go Back To Where You Came From is a Logie Award-winning Australian TV documentary series, produced by Cordell Jigsaw Productions and broadcast in 2011 (Season 1) and 2012 (Season 2) on SBS.

The series followed two parties, each of six Australians, all members having differing opinions on Australia's asylum seeker debate, being taken on a journey in reverse to that which refugees have taken to reach Australia.

Concept[edit]

Season 1[edit]

The six Australian participants were Gleny Rae, Adam Hartup, Raquel Moore, Darren Hassan, Raye Colbey, and Roderick Schneider. Deprived of their wallets, phones and passports, they board a leaky refugee boat (from which they are rescued mid-ocean), experience immigration raids in Malaysia, live in a Kenyan refugee camp, visit slums in Jordan before ultimately making it to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Iraq, protected by UN Peacekeepers and the US military.[1] In the final episode, the participants are debriefed for their response to the experiences.

Season 2[edit]

The celebrity cast for the 2012 season was Peter Reith, Angry Anderson, Allan Asher, Catherine Deveny, Mike Smith and Imogen Bailey.[2] The participants were placed on a rickety boat bound for Christmas Island.[3]

Over three episodes, the six Australians also experienced mortal danger on the streets of the world’s deadliest cities - from the sweltering, war-torn capital of Somalia, Mogadishu, to the riotous streets of Kabul, freezing amidst the mountains of Afghanistan. They also travelled to the Christmas Island Detention Centre.[4]

Reception[edit]

On its premiere night, the series became the number one trending topic on Twitter worldwide.

Go Back To Where You Came From's viewing figures made it the highest-rating programme for SBS in 2011. An estimated 524,000 metropolitan viewers watched the first episode, followed by 569,000 for the second and 600,000 for the third.[5]

The broadcaster subsequently announced that it would hold a televised forum event to reflect on the series and the public debate about asylum seekers.[6]

Episodes[edit]

Season 1[edit]

Episode 1

Episode 2

  • Immigration housing, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • Construction site immigration raid, Malaysia

Episode 3

Season 2[edit]

Episode 1

Episode 2

Episode 3

Ratings[edit]

  • Episode 1 – 524,000 23rd for the night[7]
  • Episode 2 – 569,000 24th for the night[8]
  • Episode 3 – 600,000 19th for the night[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "In Australia, Reality TV Tackles Immigration". The New York Times. 22 June 2011. Retrieved 22 June 2011. 
  2. ^ David Knox "Peter Reith to feature in next Go Back to Where You Came From" at tvtonight.com, 25 May 2012. Accessed 27 June 2013
  3. ^ David Knox Go Back Sails to Christmas Island at tvtonight.com, 19 July 2012. Accessed 27 June 2013
  4. ^ "About the Show". Special Broadcasting Service. Retrieved 30 August 2012. 
  5. ^ "Go Back To Where You Came From finishes on a high". The Spy Report (Media Spy). 24 June 2011. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "SBS to hold Go Back To Where You Came From forum". The Spy Report (Media Spy). 23 June 2011. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  7. ^ Free To Air TV Ratings, Tuesday 21 June 2011
  8. ^ Free To Air TV Ratings, Wednesday 22 June 2011
  9. ^ Free To Air TV Ratings, Thursday 23 June 2011

External links[edit]