Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album

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Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality contemporary world music albums
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 2004
Last awarded 2011
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album was an honor presented to recording artists between 2004 and 2011 for quality contemporary world music albums. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

The Grammy Award for Best World Music Album was first presented at the 34th Grammy Awards in 1992. The category remained unchanged until 2004, when it was split into separate awards for Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album and Best Contemporary World Music Album. The first award for Best Contemporary World Music Album was presented to Cesária Évora at the 46th Grammy Awards for the album Voz d'Amor. In 2011, a major overhaul of the Grammy categories resulted in the merge of the two awards to a single Best World Music Album category beginning in 2012.

Recipients[edit]

For the 46th Grammy Awards (2004), Best Contemporary World Music Album nominees included Cesária Évora for Voz d'Amor, Bill Frisell for The Intercontinentals, Youssou N'Dour for Nothing's in Vain (Coono du Reer), Orchestra Baobab for Specialist in All Styles, and Caetano Veloso for Live in Bahia.[3] The award was presented to Évora.

2005 nominees included Paco de Lucía for Cositas Buenas, Bebel Gilberto for Bebel Gilberto, the Gipsy Kings for Roots, Angélique Kidjo for Oyaya!, and Youssou N'Dour for Egypt.[4] The award was presented to N'Dour.

Nominees for the 48th Grammy Awards in 2006 included Amadou & Mariam for Dimanche à Bamako, Gilberto Gil for Eletracústico, Kronos Quartet and Asha Bhosle for You've Stolen My Heart: Songs from R.D. Burman's Bollywood, Ladysmith Black Mambazo and the Strings of the English Chamber Orchestra for No Boundaries, and Anoushka Shankar for Rise.[5] The honor was presented to Gil.

For the 49th Grammy Awards (2007), the nominees were Richard Bona for Tiki, Salif Keita for M'Bemba, The Klezmatics for Wonder Wheel, Ladysmith Black Mambazo for Long Walk to Freedom, and Ali Farka Touré for Savane.[6] The Klezmatics earned the award for Best Contemporary World Music Album.

Nominees for the 50th Grammy Awards (2008) included Céu for CéU, Gilberto Gil for Gil Luminoso, Bebel Gilberto for Momento, Angélique Kidjo for Djin Djin, and Loreena McKennitt for An Ancient Muse.[7] The award was presented to Kidjo.

At the 51st Grammy Awards 2009 the award "Best Contemporary World Music Album" was won by Mickey Hart, Zakir Hussain, Sikiru Adepoju and Giovanni Hidalgo for their album Global Drum Project.

At the 52nd Grammy Awards, it was won by Bela Fleck for Throw Down Your Heart: Tales from the Acoustic Planet, Vol. 3 - Africa Sessions.Unsuccessful nominees included Welcome To Mali - Amadou & Mariam, Day By Day - Femi Kuti, Seya - Oumou Sangare and Across the Divide: A Tale of Rhythm & Ancestry by Omar Sosa.

In 2011, at the 53 Awards Bela Fleck also won with the second part Throw Down Your Heart: Africa Sessions Part 2: Unreleased Tracks. Other nominees were "All in One" by Bebel Gilberto, "ÕŸÖ" by Angelique Kidjo, "Bom Tempo" by Sérgio Mendes and "Om Namo Narayanaya: Soul Call" by Chandrika Krishnamurthy Tandon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 12, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Complete list of Grammy Award nominations". East Valley Tribune. December 4, 2003. Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 7, 2004. p. 8. Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 9, 2005. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 8, 2006. p. 8. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  7. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominees". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 6, 2007. p. 3. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 

External links[edit]