Guilty Gear

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This article is about the series. For the first game in the series, see Guilty Gear (video game).
Guilty Gear
Genres Fighting game
Developers Arc System Works
Publishers Arc System Works (Guilty Gear, 2: Overture)
Sammy Entertainment
Sega (Xrd)
Creators Daisuke Ishiwatari
Platform of origin PlayStation
Year of inception 1998
First release Guilty Gear
May 14, 1998
Latest release Guilty Gear Xrd
February 20, 2014
Official website www.guiltygearx.com/

Guilty Gear (ギルティギア Giruti Gia?) is a series of competitive fighting games by Arc System Works and designed by artist Daisuke Ishiwatari. The first game in the series was published in 1998, and spawned several sequels. It was also adapted to other media such manga and drama CD. Guilty Gear has generally received praise from video game reviewers for its graphics, soundtrack, and mainly for its characters. Another fighting game by Arc System Works, BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger, is considered a spiritual successor of the series.

Games[edit]

Guilty Gear was first released in Japan on May 14, 1998 for the PlayStation.[1] It takes place around the year 2180, in a chaotic, mystical future world. In 2010, mankind discovered an unlimited energy source of incredible power, which was labeled magic. Despite providing a solution for world energy crisis, wars continued. The power of magic was combined with humans and other creatures creating living weapons known as "Gears". Eventually, the Gears turned on the human race, beginning a century-long global war known as the Crusades where the Sacred Order of Holy Knights (聖騎士団 Seikishidan?), defeated Justice, leader of the Gears. With Justice having been locked away in a dimensional prison, all other Gears seemingly ceased to function, bringing end to an age of conflict. Five years after the war's end, a Gear called Testament planned to free Justice. In response, the United Nations heralded a tournament of fighters capable of defeating the resurgent enemies, Testament and Justice. Ultimately, a bounty hunter named Sol Badguy defeated Justice, giving way to another uneasy peace.

Guilty Gear X was first released in Japan on July 2000 for the arcades.[1] Less than a year later, reports of a newly discovered commander Gear surfaced. Fearing the dawn of another war, the United Nations held a tournament, offering 500,000 World Dollars for the destruction of the Gear. The Gear was a girl named Dizzy, who, while very powerful, lacked a desire for war and unnecessary destruction. She was defeated, but her life was spared by Sol Badguy. Soon, though, she was found by Ky Kiske, the charismatic police chief of the United Nations and ex-chief of the Sacred Order of Holy Knights. He entrusted her care to Johnny and May, the leader of the Jellyfish Air Pirates, who welcomed her as one of their own. Jam Kuradoberi, a bounty hunter and struggling chef, claimed credit for Dizzy's disappearance so she could collect the reward and finance her restaurant.

Guilty Gear X2 was first released in Japan on May 23, 2002 for the arcades.[1] The time following Dizzy's disappearance, the mysterious Post War Administration Bureau began secretly investigating the Gears and fighters from previous tournaments for their own needs and ambitions. Various powers were working in the shadows to gain control of the world, one being the very creator of the Gears, a mysterious figure known only as "That Man". Fighters find themselves in a reality beyond their control, most notably in the manipulative hands of the villainess I-No, who is revealed to be a servant of That Man.

Guilty Gear Petit was first released in Japan on January 25, 2001 for the WonderSwan, and spawned a sequel, Guilty Gear Petit 2 released on the September 27 of the same year also for the WonderSwan.[1]

Guilty Gear Isuka was first released in Japan on December 17, 2003 for the arcades.[1]

Guilty Gear Dust Strikers was first released in North America on April 25, 2006 for the Nintendo DS.[2]

Guilty Gear Judgment was first released in Japan on August 24, 2006 for the PlayStation Portable.[3] A week has passed without any word from the small Eastern European kingdom of Villtania. However, as refugees are found, the United Nations becomes aware of devastation and ungodly experiments conducted by Villtania's leading sorcerer and scientist, Raymond. As a result, the United Nations declares an international emergency and promptly offers a reward to anyone who can stop Raymond and bring order back to Villtania. A large gathering of warriors attracted to earning the bounty soon fight to decide who will challenge Raymond.

Guilty Gear 2: Overture was first released in Japan on November 29, 2007 for the Xbox 360.[4] Set five years after Guilty Gear, Humanity created the Gears, biological weapons based on an endless energy called divine power. But one of the Gears went berserk, declared war on humanity, and started a terrible war. In response, mankind formed an order of elite knights, ending the Gears' reign of terror. It seemed that peace had been restored. But true history has yet to reveal itself, until now, in Guilty Gear 2: Overture. It is the first entry in the series to use 3D models instead of sprites, and is not a traditional fighting game.

Pro Jumper! Guilty Gear Tangent!? was first released in Japan on June 23, 2011 for the DSiWare.[5]

Guilty Gear Xrd set in 2187, one year after the events of Overture, is released on February 20, 2014 in Japanese Arcades and it will be released in 2014 for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4. It is the second entry in the series to use 3D models instead of sprites.[6]

Gameplay[edit]

Guilty Gear consists primarily of one-on-one competitive battles. Players are tasked with depleting their opponent's life gauge by utilizing attacks unique to each playable character. In the case of timed matches, the player with the most remaining life when time runs out is the victor of that round.

Guilty Gear Isuka prominently allowed up to four simultaneous players in battle, as well as the option to divide the characters into teams. It also eschewed the typical multiple-round format in favor of each player having a limited stock of "souls". Depleting a player's life gauge decreased their stock of souls and temporarily incapacitated them, and each remaining soul allowed a player to return to battle with a full life gauge. They would be defeated for the rest of the match if their life gauge and souls were both exhausted. These features have not returned for subsequent games.

Each game in the series includes a "Tension Gauge" that fills as the player performs offensive maneuvers, such as approaching the opponent or attacking them. Portions of the Tension Gauge can be expended to perform various techniques. Each character has at least one Overdrive, special attacks that can deal extensive damage to an opponent or bolster aspects of the user, like speed or attack power. "Faultless Defense" allows players to prevent "tick damage", damage received from normally guarding against special attacks, at the expense of the Tension Gauge. Guilty Gear X and later titles introduced more advanced techniques involving the Tension Gauge, such as the "Roman Cancel", allowing players to immediately stop the remaining animation of an attack, and "Dead Angle Attacks", counterattacks performed while a player is guarding.

The Tension Gauge is also tied in with the usage of "instant kill" techniques (一撃必殺技 ichigeki hissatsu waza?), high-risk attacks that are difficult to connect with but instantly incapacitate the opponent regardless of the amount of life remaining. In Guilty Gear, these attacks ended the entire match if they successfully hit the opponent, but this was toned down in later games by ending the round instead. Failing to connect with the technique penalizes the user by removing the Tension Gauge and its related uses for the rest of the round.

Guilty Gear X2 introduced a "Burst Gauge" that slowly fills during the progression of a match. When completely filled, players can perform a "Psyche Burst" in an attempt to quickly stop an opponent's offense, even knocking back the opponent if they are close enough. This mechanic has also appeared in some form in other Arc System Works games, such as Blazblue and Persona 4 Arena, as well as other fighting games such as Skullgirls.

Many characters also feature their own unique mechanics that differentiate them from each other. For example, Zato-1 utilizes a shadow-like symbiotic creature named Eddie that is able to detach itself and be controlled separately for a period of time, allowing complex tandem attacks between the two. Venom can set out weaponized billiard balls on screen that can be projected in various directions depending on how the player strikes them with certain attacks. Johnny carries a limited set of coins that can be thrown at the opponent. Though the coins themselves deal little damage, each successive hit strengthens his "Mist Finer" technique to incredibly powerful levels.

Playable characters[edit]

Character Guilty Gear X[7] Petit[8] X2[9] Isuka[10] DS[11] Judgment[12] 2[13] Xrd[14]
A.B.A Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickYa Green tickYb Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Anji Mito Red XN Green tickY Green tickYb Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Axl Low Green tickY Green tickY Green tickYb Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Baiken Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Bedman Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Bridget Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Chipp Zanuff Green tickY Green tickY Green tickYc Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Dizzy Red XN Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Dr. Paradigm Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN
Elphelt Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Fanny Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Faust/Dr. Baldhead Green tickY Green tickY Green tickYc Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
I-No Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Izuna Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN
Jam Kuradoberi Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Johnny Red XN Green tickY Green tickYc Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Justice Green tickY Green tickYd Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Kliff Undersn Green tickY Green tickYd Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN
Ky Kiske Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
May Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Millia Rage Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Potemkin Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Ramlethal Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY
Robo-Ky Red XN Green tickYd Red XN Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Red XN Red XN Red XN
Sin Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
Slayer Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Sol Badguy Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Valentine Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Red XN
Testament Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Venom Red XN Green tickY Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Zappa Red XN Red XN Red XN Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Red XN
Zato-1 / Eddie Green tickY Green tickY Green tickYc Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Red XN Green tickY
Total 13 18 13 24 21 21 20 6 16
Notes

^a Only playable in the update version, Guilty Gear XX Slash.[15]
^b Only playable in the PlayStation 2 version.[16]
^c Only in Guilty Gear Petit 2.[17]
^d Only in in the update version, Guilty Gear X Plus.[18][19]

Media[edit]

In addition to the Guilty Gear video game series, other products were also released. Two novelizations of Guilty Gear X were written by Norimitsu Kaihō, illustrated by the own Daisuke Ishiwatari, and published by Enterbrain: Lightning the Argent (白銀の迅雷 Shirogane no Jinrai?), and The Butterfly and Her (胡蝶と疾風 Kochō to Hayate?), on January 20, 2001 and on August 24, 2002.[20][21] A manga titled Guilty Gear Xtra (ギルティギアXTRA?), a collaboration among Daisuke Ishiwatari, Norimitsu Kaihō, and Akihito Sumii, was serialized in Kodansha's Magazine Z on September 22, 2003.[22] Studio DNA and Enterbrain also published comics anthologies.[21][23] Several drama CDs were published; Scitron released a series of two drama CDs—Guilty Gear X Vol. 1 and Vol. 2—between October 24, and November 24, 2001,[23] and two series of drama CDs based on Guilty Gear X2 were released by Team Entertainment: Red and Black—a series— were released in 2003 between July 16, and August 20.[21] the another series, Night of Knives, was published in three volumes between October 20 and December 22, 2004.[24][25] Also action figures, guidebooks, and a trading card game series based on Guilty Gear were released.[21][23]

Music[edit]

Reception and legacy[edit]

Aggregate review scores
As of August 3, 2013.
Game GameRankings Metacritic
Guilty Gear (PS) 78.44%[26] NA
Guilty Gear X (DC) 89.33%[27]
(PS2) 79.70%[28]
(GBA) 64.97%[29]
(PS2) 79[30]
(GBA) 67[31]
Guilty Gear X2 (PS2) 86.14%[32] (PS2) 87[33]
Guilty Gear X2 #Reload (Xbox) 85.02%[34] (Xbox) 86[35]
Guilty Gear Isuka (PS2) 75.56%[36] (PS2) 73[37]
Guilty Gear Dust Strikers 58.97%[38] 60[39]
Guilty Gear Judgment 74.36%[40] 77[41]
Guilty Gear XX Accent Core (PS2) 78.75%[42]
(Wii) 74.88%[43]
(PS2) 77[44]
(Wii) 75[45]
Guilty Gear 2: Overture 58.19%[46] 56[47]
Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus (PS2) 82.67%[48]
(PSP) 78%[49]
(Wii) 78%[50]
(360) 72.89%[51]
(PS3) 74.57%[52]
(Wii) 76[53]
(360) 74[54]
(PS3) 75[55]
Pro Jumper! Guilty Gear Tangent!? 75.00%[56] NA[57]
Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R 69.83%[58] 71[59]

The Guilty Gear series is considered a cult classic among video game fans.[60][61][62][63] The series has often been remarked for its visual elements, fighting engine, soundtrack, character's attacks and the characters itself.[64][65][66][67][68][69][70][71][72][73][74] Guilty Gear is considered by several sources to be the greatest 2D fighting game.[75][76][77] GameSpot said that "Guilty Gear is one of the few non-Capcom or SNK 2D fighters to make any sort of impact on the genre",[78] while Eurogamer stated: "If 2D beat-em-ups are moving toward extinction, they really are ending on a high note with stuff like this."[79] Its subsequent sequels were also well received. GameSpy said "Guilty Gear X is hands-down the best 2D fighting game to date",[80] and Guilty Gear XX was described by About.com as "easily the best 2D fighter to come around in a long time."[81] X '​s Dreamcast version has the highest score of the series as compiled by review aggregate GameRankings (89.33%),[27] while XX for PlayStation 2 occupies that position according to other review aggregate, Metacritic (87).[33] On other hand, the lowest score is given to Guilty Gear 2: Overture from both GameRankings (58.19%)[46] and Metacritic (56/100).[47]

In 2012, Complex ranked Guilty Gear at number 47 on the list of the best video game franchises, commenting: "Where other fighters were moving toward realism and more down to Earth physics and combos, Guilty Gear was content to turn those notions on their head, paving the way for the more chaotic fighters we're seeing today.".[82] Yahoo! Voices' editor S.W. Hampson included Guilty Gear among the 10 best fighting game franchises of all time, praising the series evolution along the years, and the "distinctive visual flair" of its 2D sprites, as well as the "well-defined story lines", adding "its identity is among the most unique in the world of beat-'em-ups."[60]

BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger, another fighting game developed by Arc System Works, is often referred to as a spiritual successor of the Guilty Gear series.[83][84][85][86][87]


References[edit]

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