Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prizes

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The Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prizes are annual prizes awarded by Royal Society of Chemistry to British chemists who are 34 years of age or below. The prize is given to scientist who demonstrate the most meritorious and promising original investigations in chemistry and published results of those investigations. There are 3 prizes given every year, each winning £5000 and a medal. Candidates are not permitted to nominate themselves.

They were begun in 2008 when two previous awards, the Meldola Medal and Prize and the Edward Harrison Memorial Prize, were joined together. [1]

Winners of the Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prizes [2][edit]

2014[edit]

  • David Glowacki, University of Bristol
  • Erwin Reisner, University of Cambridge
  • Matthew Fuchter, Imperial College London

2013[edit]

  • Andrew Baldwin, University of Oxford
  • John Bower, University of Bristol
  • Aron Walsh, University of Bath

2012[edit]

  • Michael Ingleson, University of Manchester
  • Tuomas Knowles, University of Cambridge
  • Marina Kuimova, Imperial College London

2011[edit]

  • Craig Banks, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Tomislav Friscic, Cambridge University
  • Philip Kukura, University of Oxford

2010[edit]

  • Scott Dalgarno, Heriot-Watt University
  • Andrew Goodwin, University of Oxford
  • Nathan S Lawrence, Schlumberger Cambridge Research

2009[edit]

  • Eva Hevia, University of Strathclyde

Previous winners of the Meldola Medal and Prize[edit]

The Meldola Medal and Prize commemorated Raphael Meldola, President of the Maccabaeans and the Institute of Chemistry. The last winners of the prize in 2007 were Hon Lam from the University of Edinburgh, and Rachel O'Reilly of the University of Cambridge.

Previous winners of the Edward Harrison Memorial Prize[edit]

The Edward Harrison Memorial Prize commemorated the work of Edward Harrison who was credited with producing the first serviceable gas mask. The last winner of the prize was Katherine Holt of University College London.

References[edit]