Heinkel He 74

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He 74
Role Light fighter and advanced trainer
Manufacturer Heinkel
Designer Günter brothers
First flight 1933
Number built 3

The Heinkel He 74 was a light fighter aircraft developed in Germany in the early 1930s. It was a conventional, single-bay biplane with staggered, unequal-span wings braced with an I-type interplane strut. The pilot sat in an open cockpit, and the undercarriage was of the fixed, tailskid type.

It was designed in response to a RLM requirement for a Heimatschutzjäger - a light fighter aircraft suitable for purely defensive duties and which would have a secondary role as an advanced trainer for fighter pilots. Although it was not strictly a requirement of the specification, firms submitting designs were urged to use a monoplane layout.

During trials in 1934, the He 74 outperformed its competitors, but in the end, the RLM awarded it third place, behind the Focke-Wulf Fw 56 and Arado Ar 76, believing that since the fighters then being developed were all monoplanes, this configuration was essential for an advanced trainer as well.

Specifications[edit]

Data from Warplanes of the Third Reich[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Length: 6.45 m (21 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.15 m (26 ft 8¾ in)
  • Height: 2.20 m (7 ft 2½ in)
  • Wing area: 14.9 m2 (160.6 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 771 kg (1,697 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,019 kg (2,242 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 10C, 180 kW (240 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 280 km/h (174 mph)
  • Cruising speed: 235 km/h (146 mph)
  • Range: 370 km (230 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 4,800 m (15,750 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 6.4 m/s (1,262[2] ft/min)

Armament

References[edit]

  1. ^ Green 1972, p. 286.
  2. ^ Climb to 1,000 m (3,280 ft): 2.6 min
  • Green, William (1972). Warplanes of the Third Reich. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-05782-2. 
  • Nowarra, Heinz J. (1977). Die deutsche Luftrüstung 1933-1945. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. pp. Teil 2, p.184. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 502. 

External links[edit]