Hook Tavern

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hook's Tavern
Hooks Tavern Capon Bridge WV 2008 11 1 06.JPG
Hook's Tavern's front elevation viewed from U.S. Route 50.
Location Junction of U.S. Route 50 & Smokey Hollow Road (County Route 6), Capon Bridge, West Virginia
Nearest city Capon Bridge, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°18′3″N 78°24′51″W / 39.30083°N 78.41417°W / 39.30083; -78.41417Coordinates: 39°18′3″N 78°24′51″W / 39.30083°N 78.41417°W / 39.30083; -78.41417
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 11000260
Added to NRHP April 29, 2011

Hook Tavern is a late 18th-century tavern along the Northwestern Turnpike (U.S. Route 50) east of Capon Bridge in Hampshire County, West Virginia.[1] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 29, 2011.

History[edit]

Located near the eastern base of Bear Garden Mountain in the Mill Branch valley, Hook Tavern was constructed along the Northwestern Turnpike between the 1790 and 1809 on property belonging to early Hampshire County settler Peter Mauzy.[1]

In 1840, the property was purchased by the Hook family who began operating the building as a tavern.[1][2] Samuel Hook and John B. Sherrard obtained a hotel license on May 26, 1848 to operate the tavern as a fully functioning hotel.[3] On June 1, 1862, Hook paid $10 for another hotel keeper's license.[1]

During the American Civil War, on February 3, 1862, J. A. Hunter of the Confederate States Army stated that because of severe weather, it was necessary for the Confederates to commandeer Samuel Hook's tavern and wood for the comfort of 80 sick men in his charge.[1]

Renovations in July 1956 revealed the name and date "William C. Black, May 7, 1845" on a plaster wall.[1] Other names and remarks discovered included: "I can throw any mule driver on the road, John New" and "Too much snuff, McCauley" dated May 7, 1853.[1]

The Hook family and its descendants owned the tavern and its surrounding property from 1840 until 1987 when it was purchased by real estate developer Edward Noble of Atlanta, Georgia.[1] In 2009, the tavern and its adjacent three acres were listed on the market for sale.[4] The property is now a junk store owned by Judson Eversole, of Eversole Enterprises.

Architecture[edit]

Hook Tavern is an ell-shaped structure with one leg parallel to U.S. Route 50 and the other parallel to Smokey Hollow Road (County Route 6).[1][5] Hook Tavern is a clapboard-covered, two-story structure with floors on three varying heights indicating that it was built in several phases.[1] The tavern's front face along U.S. Route 50 is graced with a two-story porch. Its oldest constructed section contains a large fireplace with printles upon which a crane swung pots over the fire.[1] Hook Tavern contains approximately 4,000 square feet (370 m2) consisting of ten rooms and two bathrooms.[4]

Image gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Hampshire County Historical Society (2006). Christmas in Old Hampshire. Romney, West Virginia: Hampshire County Historical Society. 
  2. ^ Kerns, Wilmer L. (1992). Historical Records of Old Frederick and Hampshire Counties, Virginia. Heritage Books. ISBN 1-55613-592-0. 
  3. ^ Patti McDonald & Michelle Staggs (2008). "HAMPSHIRE COUNTY HOTEL LICENSES". Mineral County West Virginia GenWeb Project. Retrieved 2008-03-09. 
  4. ^ a b Lost River Real Estate (2009). "HISTORIC TAVERN – Capon Bridge, W. VA". Lost River Real Estate. Retrieved 2008-03-09. [dead link]
  5. ^ Charles C. Hall (2000). "Some Historic Buildings of Hampshire County". HistoricHampshire.org. Retrieved 2008-03-09. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Hooks Tavern (Capon Bridge, West Virginia) at Wikimedia Commons