Ignatius Jones

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ignatius Jones
Birth name Juan Ignacio Trápaga
Born 1957 (age 56–57)
Singalong, Manila, Philippines
Origin Sydney, Australia
Genres Shock rock, new wave, jazz
Occupation(s) Events director, actor, singer-songwriter, contortionist, journalist, dancer
Years active 1976–present
Labels Avenue, Festival
Associated acts Jimmy and the Boys, Pardon Me Boys

Ignatius Jones (born Juan Ignacio Trápaga in 1957, Singalong, Manila, Philippines) is an Australian events director, journalist, actor and previously fronted the shock rock band Jimmy and the Boys. From 1976 to 1982 the group pioneered the use of shock theatrics in Australia. By the end of the 1970s they were "one of the most popular live acts on the Australian scene" with Jones performing as lead vocalist and contortionist alongside Joylene Thornbird Hairmouth (born William O'Riordan) on keyboards and vocals as a kitsch transvestite. In 1981 they scored their only top 10 single with "They Won't Let My Girlfriend Talk to Me", which was written by Split Enz leader, Tim Finn. In 1982 after their disbandment, Jones pursued a solo career and by the mid-1980s was a member of a swing jazz-cabaret band, Pardon Me Boys, with O'Riordan and Jones' sister, Monica Trapaga – former Play School presenter. In 1990 Jones, with Pat Sheil, co-wrote True Hip and Jones followed it a year later with The 1992 True Hip Manual.

As an actor, Jones appeared on TV series including Sweet and Sour (1984) and Culture Shock (1985). He had minor roles in comedy films including Those Dear Departed (1987) and Pandemonium (1988). For the 1992 musical film, Strictly Ballroom, Jones sang "Yesterday's Hero" (original by John Paul Young). Jones worked with David Atkins on the 2000 Sydney Olympics Opening and Closing Ceremonies, which included co-directing the horse segment that launched the opening ceremony. The pair oversaw the Opening Ceremony of Shanghai 2010 World Expo and the ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games.

Biography[edit]

Ignatius Jones was born in 1957 as Juan Ignacio Trápaga in Singalong, Manila, Philippines of a Basque-Chinese father, Nestor Juan Trápaga, and a Catalan-American mother, Margot (born 15 May 1935, nee Esteban).[1][2][3] Also born in Manila are two of his younger siblings, Luis Miguel and Rocio Maria (born 9 August 1962).[1][3] His paternal grandfather was a conductor while Jones' father, Nestor, was a musician playing violin, conga and bongo drums.[4] His maternal grandfather, Luis Esteban (died 1964), was an actor and professional cartoonist, while his maternal grandmother, Mary Case Esteban (born 1908), was a caterer for state events – including for then-President Ferdinand Marcos – and a couturier.[3] In January 1963 Nestor migrated to Australia via a plane flight to Sydney,[5] he was followed in March by Margot (Margaret) and their three children.[1] Jones' younger sister, Monica Trapaga, was born in 1965 in Sydney – she was later a Play School presenter and children's entertainer.[2][3] Jones became a naturalised Australian in 1971, but maintains a dual Spanish-Australian citizenship. Jones grew up in Wahroonga and attended St Leo's Catholic College before switching to St Ignatius' College, Riverview, near the Sydney river-side suburb of Lane Cove.[2] Jones contended for dux of his year level with Tony Abbott – later a Liberal Party politician – Jones struggled with mathematics but excelled in Ancient Greek and Latin.[6] Jones followed Monica to her dance lessons and started a theatrical career as a classical ballet dancer but switched to more contemporary music.[6][7]

Jimmy and the Boys[edit]

Main article: Jimmy and the Boys

In 1976, Ignatius Jones was a founding mainstay member of shock rockers Jimmy and the Boys with Joylene Thornbird Hairmouth (born William O'Riordan) which formed in Sydney. The original line-up was Jones on lead vocals, Hairmouth on keyboards and vocals, Tom Falkinham on bass guitar, Scott Johnson on drums, Jason Morphett on saxophone and Andrew de Teliga on guitar.[8] On-stage Jones was also a contortionist and Hairmouth was "the kitchiest [sic] of transvestites", other than Jones and Hairmouth, the line-up was regularly changed.[8] By the end of the 1970s they were "one of the most popular live acts on the Australian scene".[8] In 1981 they scored their only top 10 single with "They Won't Let My Girlfriend Talk to Me",[9] written by Split Enz leader, Tim Finn.[8][10] After issuing two studio albums and a live set, the group disbanded in 1982 with Jones set to pursue a solo career.[8]

From Pardon Me Boys to Monica and the Moochers[edit]

In April 1982, Ignatius Jones issued his debut solo single, "Like a Ghost", which was written by The Church's frontman Steve Kilbey.[8] Jones' second single, "Whispering Your Name", appeared in March 1983. Both singles were "hot dance club favourites among the gay community on the American west coast".[8] In 1984, Jones formed Arms & Legs with Jeremy Cook on drums, Kirk Godfrey on guitar (ex-Big Red Tractor), Steve Harris on bass guitar (Passengers, Visitors) and Andrew Ross on keyboards (Ward 13) but they disbanded after a year. In 1985 Jones was a member of a swing jazz-cabaret band, Pardon Me Boys, with O'Riordan and Jones' sister, Monica Trapaga.[7][8] As a journalist, Jones contributed to RAM (aka Rock Australia Magazine) – starting in 1983, The Edge and, in June 1985 became the editor of Stilletto magazine.[7][8] In 1984, as an actor, he appeared in an episode of ABC-TV's music drama series, Sweet and Sour. In 1985 he appeared on Culture Shock for SBS-TV as a reporter on youth affairs and interviewer.[7] For the 1987 comedy film, Those Dear Departed, Jones acted in the role of Phil Rene alongside stars Garry McDonald and Pamela Stephenson.[11] For the 1988 campy comedy film, Pandemonium, he portrayed a marriage celebrant and supported David Argue in the lead role.[12] In 1990 Jones, with Pat Sheil, co-wrote True Hip and Jones followed it a year later with The 1992 True Hip Manual.[13][14]

On the soundtrack for 1992 musical film, Strictly Ballroom, Jones performed John Paul Young's song "Yesterday's Hero", and the Spanish dance-flavoured, "Rhumba de Burros".[15] In 1997 he co-directed, with Trapaga, a children's video, Monica's Seaside Adventure, by Monica and the Moochers with Peter Cox and George Washingmachine.[16] In 1999 he directed Monica's Trip to the Moon by Monica and the Moochers with McKaw, Fridge, Compost Bin and Dr. Wango Tango.[17] The track, "Old Doctor Wango Tango", was co-written by Jones and Julian Gough.[18][19]

Later career: events director[edit]

Ignatius Jones with David Atkins, were the creative directors for the 2000 Sydney Olympics Opening and Closing Ceremonies, which included co-directing the horse segment that launched the Opening Ceremony. He was responsible for Sydney's Millennium Celebrations and directed its New Year's Eve and Centenary of Federation celebrations. In 2002 with Atkins, Jones co-wrote and co-directed the stage musical, The Man from Snowy River: Arena Spectacular. Also that year, Jones staged the Independence Ceremonies of the Democratic Republic of East Timor for the United Nations. In November Jones directed the 2002 Gay Games Opening Ceremony, he greeted the audience of 38,000 with "Australia and the gay and lesbian community is not so much a melting pot ... We are more of a mixed salad, where every part remains separate, yet adds to the wonder of the whole ... I have been lucky, I have never had to come out, I was never in".[20] In 2005 he produced a corporate event at the Jeddah Economic Forum in Saudi Arabia. Jones and Atkins worked on the ceremonies of the Doha 2006 Asian Games. Jones and Atkins also worked on the Opening Ceremony of Shanghai 2010 World Expo and the Ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games.

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Item details for: SP908/1, American/Trapaga M". Department of Immigration, New South Wales Branch. National Archives of Australia. 9 March 2000. pp. 1, 3, 5. Retrieved 12 June 2012. Margaret Trapaga [American – first arrived Sydney per aircraft VH-EBA, 20 March 1963. Multiple arrivals. Box 41] 
  2. ^ a b c Shmith, Michael (18 May 2003). "The Can-Can Can-Do Man". The Age (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d Trápaga, Monica (26 October 2009). "Introduction". She's Leaving Home: Favourite Family Recipes for a Daughter to Take on Her Own Life Journey. illustrated by Meredith Gaston. Camberwell, Vic: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-1-92138-206-2. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  4. ^ Coslovich, Gabriella (10 May 2003). "Punk Maestro". The Age (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "Item details for: SP908/1, Spanish/Trapaga Nestor Juan". Department of Immigration, New South Wales Branch. National Archives of Australia. 30 April 2009. Retrieved 12 June 2012. Nestor Juan Trapaga [Other nationality: Born in the Philippines, Spanish – Arrived Sydney per Aircraft 30 January 1963]  Note: If required user may need to initiate a new search. First select 'Home', then 'Search the collection', 'RecordSearch – Basic Search'. Enter 'Trapaga' and select details for 'SP908/1, Spanish/Trapaga Nestor Juan'.
  6. ^ a b Simons, Polly (24 May 2011). "Interview: Ignatius Jones, Executive Director of Vivid Sydney". NorthSide (News Community Media (News Corporation)). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Ignatius Jones". Australian Jazz Agency (Leslie Moore). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i McFarlane, Ian (1999). "Encyclopedia entry for 'Jimmy and the Boys'". Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86448-768-2. Archived from the original on 3 August 2004. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  9. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book Ltd. ISBN 0-64611-917-6.  Note: Used for Australian Singles and Albums charting from 1974 until Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) created their own charts in mid-1988. In 1992, Kent back calculated chart positions for 1970–1974.
  10. ^ ""They Won't Let My Girlfriend Talk to Me" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  11. ^ "Those Dear Departed – Cast, Crew, Director and Awards". The New York Times. The New York Times Company (Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr.). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  12. ^ "Pandemonium – Cast, Crew, Director and Awards". The New York Times. The New York Times Company (Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr.). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  13. ^ "True Hip / Ignatius Jones with Pat Sheil; illustrated by James De Vries". Catalogue. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  14. ^ "The 1992 True Hip Manual / Ignatius Jones". Catalogue. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  15. ^ [– http://www.allmusic.com/album/strictly-ballroom-cbs-mw0000090706 "Strictly Ballroom [CBS] – Original Soundtrack"]. Allmusic, Rovi Corporation. 1992. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 
  16. ^ "Monica's Seaside Adventure [videorecording] / Written by Monica Trapaga & Julian Gough; Produced by Monica Trapaga; Directed by Ignatius Jones & Monica Trapaga". Music Australia. National Library of Australia. 8 September 1997. Retrieved 12 June 2012. A clever mix of wacky fun and adventure, participating and listening songs that appeal to young imaginations, from a frolic on the beach to a magical trip beneath the sea .
  17. ^ "Monica's Trip to the Moon [videorecording] / Directed by Ignatius Jones; Producer, Monica Trapaga; Written by Monica Trapaga and Julian Gough". Music Australia. National Library of Australia. 25 January 2005. Retrieved 12 June 2012. Monica and her friends, McKaw, Fridge, Compost Bin and Dr. Wango Tango go on a singing and dancing adventure to the moon .
  18. ^ ""Old Doctor Wango Tango" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 12 June 2012.  Note: Jones is given as J Trapaga.
  19. ^ "ACE Title Search: 'Old Doctor Wango Tango'". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). Retrieved 12 June 2012.  Note: Jones is given as John Ignatius Trapaga.
  20. ^ Hacker, Peter (2002). "Glittering Show Opens Gay Game". Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender News. Ambush Mag 20 (23) (Ambush Inc). Retrieved 12 June 2012. 

External links[edit]