Inferior angle of the scapula

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Inferior angle of the scapula
Inferior angle of the left scapula01.png
Posterior surface of left scapula. Inferior angle shown in red.
Scapula post Inferior angle.png
Posterior surface of left scapula. Inferior angle seen at bottom (red circle).
Latin Angulus inferior scapulae
Gray's p.206
Anatomical terms of bone

The inferior angle of the scapula is formed by the union of the medial and lateral border of the scapula and is the lowest part of the scapula. It is thick and rough and its posterior (or back) surface affords attachment to the teres major and frequently to a few fibers of the latissimus dorsi muscle.

The anatomical plane that passes vertical through the inferior angle of the scapula is named the scapular line.

An abnormal protruding inferior angle of the scapula or winged scapula can be caused by a serratus anterior paralysis.

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This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

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