Iran–North Korea relations

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Iran–North Korea relations
Map indicating locations of Iran and North Korea

Iran

North Korea

Iran–North Korea relations are described as being positive by official news agencies of the two countries. Diplomatic relations picked up following the Iranian Revolution in 1979 and the establishment of an Islamic Republic. Iran and North Korea pledge cooperation in educational, scientific, and cultural spheres,[1] as well as cooperating in the nuclear program of Iran.[2] The United States has been greatly concerned by North Korea's arms deals with Iran, which started during the 1980s with North Korea acting as a third party in arms deals between the Communist bloc and Iran, as well as selling domestically produced weapons to Iran, and North Korea continues selling missile and nuclear technology to Iran. North Korea and Iran are the remaining two members of George W. Bush's "Axis of evil," which has led to many of the concerns regarding Iran–North Korea relations.

Ambassadors[edit]

List of North Korean ambassadors to Iran[edit]

  • Kim Jong-nam (appointed 7 November 2000)[3]
  • Kim Chang-ryong (appointed 8 January 2004)[4]

List of Iranian ambassadors to North Korea[edit]

  • Mohammad Ganjidoost (until 23 February 2001)[5]
  • Jalaleddin Namini Mianji[6]

Others[edit]

  • Ri Won Il, chairman of the DPRK-Iran Friendship Association[6]
  • Anoushiravan Mohseni Bandpei, chairman of the Iran-Korea Parliamentary Friendship Group[7]

Military weapons[edit]

Since the 1980s North Korea has become known as a reliable supplier of arms to other countries including Iran. Weapons sales between North Korea and Iran increased significantly during the Iran-Iraq war.[8] This weapons sale relationship has expanded into further military cooperation including in the development of and exchange of nuclear technology. This relationship has also involved Syria.[9][10]

During the Persian Gulf War North Korea is said to have supplied Iran with a range of arms including artillery, anti-aircraft machine guns, mortars, ammunition, tanks, small arms, naval mines and anti-tank and surface-to-air missile systems.[11] In December 2009, in contravention of an arms embargo imposed on North Korea, a shipment of North Korean arms, said to be headed for Iran, according to the Congressional Research Service, was intercepted in Thailand.[12][13] These weapons included rocket launchers and surface-to-air missile parts.[12]

In addition to weapons, North Korea and Iran have an active exchange of military expertise particularly in relation to special operations and underground facilities.[9] North Korea is thought to have trained Iranian operators in these advanced infiltration techniques.[9]

In March 2013 North Korea and Iran, as well as Syria, blocked a UN Arms Trade Treaty[14] aimed at setting "standards for all cross-border transfers of conventional weapons".[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Result of Iranian delegation visit to N Korea positive". IRNA. 23 January 2007. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  2. ^ Coughlin, Con (26 January 2007). "N. Korea helping Iran with nuclear testing". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2007-04-24. 
  3. ^ "DPRK ambassador to Iran appointed". Korean Central News Agency. 7 November 2000. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  4. ^ "DPRK Ambassador to Iran Appointed". Korean Central News Agency. 8 January 2004. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  5. ^ "Paek Nam Sun meets Iranian ambassador". Korean Central News Agency. 23 February 2001. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  6. ^ a b "DPRK-Iranian Cultural and Scientific Exchange Plan Signed". Korean Central News Agency. 19 January 2007. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  7. ^ "Kim Yong Nam Meets Iranian Delegation". Korean Central News Agency. 29 July 2006. Retrieved 24 April 2007. 
  8. ^ "Foreign Policy Goals - Military Assistance". October 1991. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c "Iran North Korea: DPRK Is Ally of US Enemies in Middle East Nuclear, Missile, Arms and Engineering Sales". Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  10. ^ John Larkin and Donald Macintyre (7 July 2003). "Arsenal Of The Axis". Time Magazine. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  11. ^ "North Korea got third of hard currency from arms sales to Iran in early 80s: Aug 1984 declassified CIA Report". KorCon Collection. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "North Korea: Back on the Terrorism List?". CRS. 29 June 2010. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  13. ^ Thomas Fuller and Choe Sang-Hun (31 January 2010). "Thais Say North Korea Arms Were Iran-Bound". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  14. ^ MacFarquhar, Neil (28 March 2013). "U.N. Treaty to Control Arms Sales Hits Snag". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  15. ^ "Iran, North Korea, Syria block UN arms trade treaty". Reuters. 29 March 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013.