Jeff Dee

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Jeff Dee
Jeff Dee.png
Jeff Dee on The Atheist Experience TV show, January 4th, 2009.
Born Jeff Dee
(1961-05-15) May 15, 1961 (age 53)
United States
Nationality American
Known for Fantasy art, illustration

Jeff Dee (born May 15, 1961) is an American artist and game designer. Based in Austin, Texas, he is a recognized figure in the role-playing game community and game industry.[1] His illustrative work shows comic book art form and influence.

Biography[edit]

In the late 1970s, while Dee was still a teenager, he and Jack Herman co-created Villains and Vigilantes, the first complete superhero role-playing game.[2] The game was published by Fantasy Games Unlimited in 1979.[3]:73 Dee and Herman convinced Scott Bizar to produce a second edition, which was published in 1982.[3]:75 Dee came up with the idea of creating a role-playing game based on cartoons when he, Greg Costikyan, and several other designers were talking about genres for which game systems had not yet been designed; although they agreed that such a game would be impossible to design, a few years later Costikyan designed Toon as a full game with the assistance of Warren Spector.[3]:104

Jeff Dee was the youngest artist in TSR history when he began his work at the age of eighteen.[4] He went on to illustrate numerous materials for the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) including interior artwork for manuals and illustrations and covers for adventure modules for the game. Some of his most recognized work can be found in the manual Deities & Demigods (especially in the Egyptian and Norse pantheons).[citation needed]

Around 1989, Dee went on to provide artwork for computer games. He worked on several installments in the Ultima series, including serving as the Art Director for Ultima VII.[citation needed] Dee has worked for companies such as Apogee, Origin, and Looking Glass Studios.[citation needed] In the early 1990s, Dee became the art director for the PC game developer Simtex and was involved in the development of several games, including Master of Orion and the sequel Master of Orion 2, Master of Magic, and other titles.[citation needed]

In 1997, with his partner 'Manda, Dee founded UNIgames, a publisher of role-playing, board and computer games. Dee created a new superhero roleplaying game called Living Legends in 2005, although the project was originally titled Advanced Villains and Vigilantes.[3]:77 In 2009, he co-founded Nemesis Games, developers of an MMO named Gargantua.[5] Dee was the Director of Development on Ashen Empires, a massively multiplayer online fantasy RPG from TKO Software, and Lead Designer on The Sims: Castaway Stories.[citation needed]

Wizards of the Coast, the current owners of D&D, discarded Dee's original artwork for several early D&D products. In the 2000s, Dee launched several Kickstarter campaigns to redraw some of the artwork. In some cases, the new artwork closely resembled the originals, while others were redone in Dee's more modern style.[citation needed]

Advocacy of atheism[edit]

In addition to his artistic and game-related work, Dee is an outspoken atheist and transhumanist.[6] He is the former host of a bi-weekly Internet podcast called The Non-Prophets (now hosted by Denis Loubet) and a current rotating co-host (and former host) of a live, weekly, Public-access television program, The Atheist Experience[7] (now hosted primarily by Matt Dillahunty).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olivo, Benjamin (March 9, 2007). "Leatherface to rev up ChimaeraCon action", San Antonio Express-News, p. H16.
  2. ^ Jebens, Harley (September 21, 1995). "Game central", Austin American-Statesman, p. 38.
  3. ^ a b c d Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN 978-1-907702-58-7. 
  4. ^ http://www.blackgate.com/2010/09/29/art-evolution-3-jeff-dee/
  5. ^ "Nemesis Games web site". Nemesisgames.net. Retrieved 2012-06-15. 
  6. ^ Rahe, Emily (July 11, 2001). "Atheists blast faith-based initiative as an unconstitutional 'religion tax'", The Washington Times, p. A9.
  7. ^ The Atheist Experience show list
  8. ^ "The Atheist Community of Austin website". Atheist-community.org. Retrieved 2012-06-15. 

External links[edit]