John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby

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John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby
Sir John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, KG.png
Arms of Sir John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, KG.
Spouse(s) Maud Percy
Elizabeth Latimer

Issue

Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland
Sir Thomas Neville of Brancepeth
Alice Neville
Maud Neville
Idoine Neville
Eleanor Neville
Elizabeth Neville
John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer
Elizabeth Neville
Noble family Neville
Father Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby
Mother Alice Audley
Born c.1337
Died 17 October 1388
Newcastle upon Tyne
Raby Castle, seat of the Neville family.

John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, KG c.1337 – 17 October 1388) was an English peer and soldier.[a]

Family[edit]

John Neville, born at Raby Castle, Durham, between 1337 and 1340, was the eldest son of Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby, and Alice Audley. He had five brothers, including Alexander Neville, Archbishop of York, and four sisters.[1]

Career[edit]

Cokayne notes that Neville's public career was as active as his father's had been. He fought against the Scots at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346 as a captain under his father, was knighted about 1360 after a skirmish near Paris while serving under Sir Walter Manny, and fought in Aquitaine in 1366, and again in 1373-4.

At his father's death on 5 August 1367 he succeeded to the title, and had livery of his lands in England and Scotland in October of that year.

From 1367 on he had numerous commissions issued to him, and in 1368 served as joint ambassador to France.[2] He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1369.[3] In July 1370 he was Admiral of the North, and in November of that year a joint commissioner to treat with Genoa. He was Steward of the King's Household in 1372, and in July of that year was part of an expedition to Brittany. For the next several years he served in Scotland and the Scottish Marches. In 1378 he had licence to fortify Raby Castle, and in June of the same year was in Gascony, where he was appointed Keeper of Fronsac Castle and Seneschal of Gascony. He spent several years in Gascony, and was among the forces which raised the siege of Mortaigne in 1381. On his return to England he was again appointed Warden of the Marches. In May 1383 and March 1387 he was a joint commissioner to treat of peace with Scotland, and in July 1385 was to accompany the King to Scotland.[4]

Neville died at Newcastle upon Tyne on 17 October 1388. In his will he requested burial in Durham Cathedral by his first wife, Maud. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[5]

Marriages and issue[edit]

Neville married, before 1362, firstly, Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, and Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom he had two sons and five daughters:[6]

After his first wife Maud's death in 1379 Neville married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom he had a son and a daughter:[7]

  • Elizabeth Neville, who married, before 27 May 1396, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died shortly before 20 August 1417) son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had one child, Sir John Willoughby (c.1400 – 24 February 1437).[9]

After Neville's death, his widow, Elizabeth, married, as his second wife, Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby.[10]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography uses a different numbering system and numbers him the 5th Baron Neville and his father the 4th etc. (Tuck 2008).
  1. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 502; Richardson III 2011, pp. 242–4.
  2. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 502; Richardson III 2011, pp. 244.
  3. ^ Shaw & Burtchaell 1906, p. 4.
  4. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Richardson III 2011, pp. 244.
  5. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Richardson III 2011, pp. 244–6.
  6. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Richardson III 2011, pp. 244–6.
  7. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Richardson III 2011, pp. 242–6.
  8. ^ Richardson IV 2011, pp. 400–1.
  9. ^ Richardson I 2011, pp. 333–4.
  10. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Richardson III 2011, p. 244; Richardson IV 2011, p. 333.

References[edit]

  • Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A Doubleday and Lord Howard de Walden IX. London: St. Catherine Press. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709. 
  • Shaw, William Arthur; Burtchaell, George Dames (1906). Knights of England. A complete record ... I. London: Sherratt and Hughes. p. 4. 
  • Tuck, Anthony (January 2008) [2004]. "Neville, John, fifth Baron Neville (c.1330–1388)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19945.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.) The first edition of this text is available as an article on Wikisource:  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1894). "Neville, John de". Dictionary of National Biography 40. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 

Further reading[edit]

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Ralph Neville
Baron Neville de Raby
1367–1388
Succeeded by
Ralph Neville