Julia Vorobieva

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Julia Vorobieva
Personal information
Full name Julia Valeryevna Vorobieva
Alternative names Vorobiova/Vorobyova
Country represented Azerbaijan
Soviet Union
Born (1974-06-25) 25 June 1974 (age 40)
Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Height 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in)
Former coach Viktor Beloussovski
Viktor Kudriavtsev
Skating club Central Army Sport Club, Baku
Began skating 1978
Retired 2002

Julia Valeryevna Vorobieva (Russian: Юлия Валерьевна Воробьёва; born 25 June 1974) is a figure skater who competed for the Soviet Union and Azerbaijan.[1] She was a two-time Soviet national champion. She placed 7th at the 1991 European Championships and 10th at the 1991 World Championships for the Soviet Union, and 14th at the 1992 Winter Olympics for the Unified Team. In 1993, Vorobieva began competing for Azerbaijan. She appeared at the 1998 Winter Olympics, placing 16th. In September 2000, she began training and coaching in Odintsovo, near Moscow.[2]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating
2000–2001
[2]
  • Murder at the Cotton Club
    by E. Key Ekstrand
  • You should be so Lucky
    by Maxwell Street Klezmer Band

Results[edit]

For the Soviet Union, Unified Team, and Russia[edit]

International
Event 1989–90
(URS)
1990–91
(URS)
1991–92
(URS/CIS)
1992–93
(RUS)
Winter Olympics 14th
World Champ. 10th
European Champ. 7th 8th
International de Paris 7th
NHK Trophy 6th
International: Junior
Piruetten 3rd
National
Russian Champ. 2nd
Soviet Champ. 1st 1st

For Azerbaijan[edit]

Results[2]
International
Event 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01
Olympics 16th
Worlds 29th 9th 21st 11th 17th 31st 43rd
Europeans 18th 9th 14th 9th 15th 23rd
GP Lalique 10th
GP Nations Cup 5th 5th
GP NHK Trophy 3rd 10th 6th 9th
GP Skate Canada 4th 8th
Finlandia 2nd
Golden Spin 4th
Karl Schäfer 3rd
Skate Israel 2nd 2nd 2nd 10th
National
Azerbaijani 1st
GP = Grand Prix

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mittan, J. Barry (1996). "The Lady from Azerbaijan". Archived from the original on 12 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Julia VOROBIEVA: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 June 2001. 

External links[edit]

Navigation[edit]