List of All-Ireland Senior Football Championship finals

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List of All-Ireland Senior Football Championship finals
The Sam Maguire Cup
Founded 1887
Region Ireland (GAA)
Number of teams 34 (qualifiers)
8 (final series)
Current champions Kerry (37th title)
Most successful team(s) Kerry (37 titles)

The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship, the premier competition in Gaelic football, is an annual series of games usually played in Ireland during the summer and early autumn, and organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). Contested by the top inter-county football teams in Ireland, the tournament has taken place every year since 1887—except in 1888, when the competition was not played due to a tour of the United States by would-be competitors.

The competition culminates on the third or fourth Sunday in September with the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final. The winning team receives the Sam Maguire Cup. The final has been played at Croke Park in Dublin since 1913, with the exception of the 1947 final which was played at the Polo Grounds in New York. Finals held before the GAA's acquirement of Croke Park were played at venues around Dublin and the counties of Cork, Kildare and Tipperary. Kerry are the most successful football team in the history of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. As of 2014, they have won the competition on 37 occasions, including two four-in-a-rows (1929 - 1932, 1978 - 1981) and two three-in-a-rows (1939 - 1941, 1984 - 1986). They are the reigning champions.

History[edit]

For more details on this topic, see History of the Gaelic Athletic Association.

Teams from the southern province of Munster shared the early titles, with Limerick, Tipperary and Cork winning the first three finals. The first Championship featured club teams who represented their respective counties after their county championship. The 21 a-side final was between Commercials of Limerick and Young Irelands of Louth. The final was played in Beech Hill, Clonskeagh (not Bird Avenue) on 29 April 1888 with Commercials winning by 1-4 to 0-3. Unlike later All-Irelands, there were no provincial championships and it was an open draw.

The second Championship was unfinished owing to the American Invasion Tour. The 1888 provincial championships had been completed (Tipperary, Kilkenny and Monaghan winning them; no Connacht teams entered) but after the Invasion tour returned, the All-Ireland semi-final and final were not played. English team London reached the final four times in the early years of the competition (1900 - 1903).

The 1903 Championship brought Kerry's first All-Ireland title. They went on to become the most successful football team in the history of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. As of 2009, they have won the competition on 36 occasions, including two four-in-a-rows (1929 - 1932, 1978 - 1981) and two three-in-a-rows (1939 - 1941, 1984 - 1986). Galway were the first team from the West to win an All-Ireland title, doing so in 1925. The 1933 final brought victory for Cavan who became the first team from the northern province of Ulster to win an All-Ireland title.

Croke Park kitted out in the green and red of long-suffering Mayo fans at the 2004 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final. Mayo's losing streak in All-Ireland finals continued as they were beaten by Kerry.

The first half of the twentieth century brought the rise of several teams who won two or more All-Ireland titles in that period, such as Kildare, Mayo, Cavan, Wexford and Roscommon. Since Cavan's fifth title in 1952 none have won a final and Cavan and Wexford have never even appeared in one again. Remarkably Mayo who last won in 1951 have appeared in numerous finals since 1989 (1989, 1996 (draw and replay), 1997, 2004, 2006, 2012 and 2013) losing them all. The record of losing finals now equals that of Cork (1891 - 1911) and Mayo's quest to end their All Ireland famine is a major sub plot the longer it continues. [1]

A record 90,556 attended the 1961 final between Down and Offaly. In the 1990s, a significant sea change took place, as the All-Ireland was claimed by an Ulster team in four consecutive years (1991 – 1994). Since then Ulster has produced more All-Ireland winning teams than any other province.[2] The 2001 final brought victory for Galway who became the first football team to win an All-Ireland by springing through "the back door." The 2003 final between Armagh and Tyrone was the first to be contested by two teams from the same province.

Finals[edit]

The following table sets out the winning team and beaten finalist of each All-Ireland Senior Football Championship final. The vast majority of finals were contested by the winning semi-finalists, although in certain cases in the early years a provincial championship had not been completed in time and the affected province nominated a team to participate in the All-Ireland semi-final. In some of these cases, the nominated team (e.g. Dublin in 1905) won its semi-final, but was then vanquished in their provincial championship, and their place in the All-Ireland final taken by another team from that province.

Key[edit]

Key to list of winners
* Final won after Replay
dagger Final not played
double-dagger Winning team won the Double

Results[edit]

Year Date Winner Score Runner-up Score Venue Attendance[3] Winning Margin (Points)
1887 29 April 1888 Limerick 1–4 Louth 0–3 Clonskeagh 7,000 4
1888 dagger Championship unfinished - the GAA committee and players travelled to the USA to promote the game abroad
1889 20 October Tipperary 3–6 Laois 0–0 Inchicore 1,500 15
1890 26 June 1892 Cork double-dagger 2–4 Wexford 0–1 Clonturk 1,000 9
1891 28 February 1892 Dublin 2–1 Cork 1–1 Clonturk 2,000 3
1892 26 March 1893 Dublin 1–4 Kerry 0–3 Clonturk 5,000 4
1893 24 June 1894 Wexford 1–1 Cork 0–1 Phoenix Park 1,000 3
1894 21 April 1894 Dublin 0–5 Cork 1–2 Thurles 10,000 0
1895 15 March 1896 Tipperary double-dagger 0–4 Meath 0–3 Jones' Road 8,000 1
1896 6 February 1898 Limerick 1–5 Dublin 0–7 Jones' Road 3,500 1
1897 5 February 1899 Dublin 2–6 Cork 0–2 Jones' Road 4,000 10
1898 8 April 1900 Dublin 2–8 Waterford 0–4 Tipperary 1,000 10
1899 10 February 1901 Dublin 1–10 Cork 0–6 Jones' Road 2,000 7
1900 26 October 1902 Tipperary double-dagger 3–7 London 0–2 Jones' Road 2,000 14
1901 2 August 1903 Dublin 0–14 London 0–2 Jones' Road 2,000 12
1902 11 September 1904 Dublin 2–8 London 0–4 Cork 10,000 10
1903 12 November 1905 Kerry 0–11 London 0–3 Jones' Road 10,000 8
1904 1 July 1906 Kerry 0–5 Dublin 0–2 Cork 10,000 3
1905 16 June 1906 Kildare 1–7 Kerry 0–5 Thurles 15,000 5
1906 20 October 1907 Dublin 0–5 Cork 0–4 Geraldine Park, Athy 8,000 1
1907 5 July 1908 Dublin 0–6 Cork 0–2 Tipperary 5,000 4
1908 3 October 1909 Dublin 1–10 London 0–4 Jones' Road 10,000 9
1909 5 December Kerry 1–9 Louth 0–6 Jones' Road 16,000 6
1910 dagger 13 November 1910 Louth W/O Kerry Scratch[A] Jones' Road
1911 14 January 1912 Cork 6–6 Antrim 1–2 Jones' Road 11,000 19
1912 3 November Louth 1–7 Antrim 1–2 Jones' Road 13,000 5
1913 14 December Kerry 2–2 Wexford 0–3 Croke Park 17,000 5
1914 29 November Kerry 2–3 Wexford 0–6 Croke Park 20,000 3
1915 7 November Wexford 2–4 Kerry 2–1 Croke Park 27,000 3
1916 17 December Wexford 3–4 Mayo 1–2 Croke Park 3,000 8
1917 9 December Wexford 0–9 Clare 0–5 Croke Park 6,500 4
1918 16 February 1919 Wexford 0–5 Tipperary 0–4 Croke Park 12,000 1
1919 28 September Kildare 2–5 Galway 0–1 Croke Park 32,000 10
1920 11 June 1922 Tipperary 1–6 Dublin 1–2 Croke Park 17,000 4
1921 17 June 1923 Dublin 1–9 Mayo 0–2 Croke Park 16,000 10
1922 7 October 1923 Dublin 0–6 Galway 0–4 Croke Park 11,792 2
1923 28 September 1924 Dublin 1–5 Kerry 1–3 Croke Park 18,500 2
1924 16 April 1925 Kerry 0–4 Dublin 0–3 Croke Park 28,844 1
1925 dagger Galway 3–2 Cavan[B] 1–2 Croke Park 6
1926 17 October Kerry 1–4 Kildare 0–4 Croke Park 35,500 3
1927 25 September Kildare 0–5 Kerry 0–3 Croke Park 36,529 2
1928 30 September Kildare 2–6 Cavan 2–5 Croke Park 24,700 1
1929 22 September Kerry 1–8 Kildare 1–5 Croke Park 43,839 3
1930 28 September Kerry 3–11 Monaghan 0–2 Croke Park 33,280 18
1931 27 September Kerry 1–11 Kildare 0–8 Croke Park 42,350 6
1932 25 September Kerry 2–7 Mayo 2–4 Croke Park 25,816 3
1933 24 September Cavan 2–5 Galway 1–4 Croke Park 45,188 4
1934 23 September Galway 3–5 Dublin 1–9 Croke Park 36,143 2
1935 22 September Cavan 3–6 Kildare 2–5 Croke Park 50,380 4
1936 27 September Mayo 4–11 Laois 0–5 Croke Park 50,168 18
1937 17 October Kerry 4–4 Cavan 1–7 Croke Park 51,234 6
1938 23 October Galway 2–4 Kerry 0–7 Croke Park 47,851 3
1939 24 September Kerry 2–5 Meath 2–3 Croke Park 46,828 2
1940 22 September Kerry 0–7 Galway 1–3 Croke Park 60,821 1
1941 7 September Kerry 1–8 Galway 0–7 Croke Park 45,512 4
1942 20 September Dublin 1–10 Galway 1–8 Croke Park 37,105 2
1943 10 October Roscommon 2–7 Cavan 2–2 Croke Park 47,193 5
1944 24 September Roscommon 1–9 Kerry 2–4 Croke Park 79,245 2
1945 23 September Cork 2–5 Cavan 0–7 Croke Park 67,329 4
1946 27 October Kerry 2–8 Roscommon 0–10 Croke Park 65,661 4
1947 14 September Cavan 2–11 Kerry 2–7 Polo Grounds, New York 34,491 4
1948 26 September Cavan 4–5 Mayo 4–4 Croke Park 74,645 1
1949 25 September Meath 1–10 Cavan 1–6 Croke Park 79,460 4
1950 24 September Mayo 2–5 Louth 1–6 Croke Park 76,174 2
1951 23 September Mayo 2–8 Meath 0–9 Croke Park 78,201 5
1952 12 October Cavan 0–9 Meath 0–5 Croke Park 62,515 4
1953 27 September Kerry 0–13 Armagh 1–6 Croke Park 86,155 4
1954 26 September Meath 1–13 Kerry 1–7 Croke Park 75,276 6
1955 25 September Kerry 0–12 Dublin 1–6 Croke Park 87,102 3
1956 7 October Galway 2–13 Cork 3–7 Croke Park 70,772 3
1957 22 September Louth 1–9 Cork 1–7 Croke Park 72,732 2
1958 28 September Dublin 2–12 Derry 1–9 Croke Park 73,371 6
1959 27 September Kerry 3–7 Galway 1–4 Croke Park 85,897 9
1960 25 September Down 2–10 Kerry 0–8 Croke Park 87,768 8
1961 24 September Down 3–6 Offaly 2–8 Croke Park 90,556 1
1962 23 September Kerry 1–12 Roscommon 1–6 Croke Park 75,771 6
1963 22 September Dublin 1–9 Galway 0–10 Croke Park 87,106 2
1964 27 September Galway 0–15 Kerry 0–10 Croke Park 76,498 5
1965 26 September Galway 0–12 Kerry 0–9 Croke Park 77,735 3
1966 25 September Galway 1–10 Meath 0–7 Croke Park 71,569 6
1967 24 September Meath 1–9 Cork 0–9 Croke Park 70,343 3
1968 22 September Down 2–12 Kerry 1–13 Croke Park 71,294 2
1969 28 September Kerry 0–10 Offaly 0–7 Croke Park 67,828 3
1970 27 September Kerry 2–19 Meath 0–18 Croke Park 71,775 7
1971 26 September Offaly 1–14 Galway 2–8 Croke Park 70,789 3
1972 15 October Offaly 1–19 Kerry 0–13 Croke Park 66,136 9
1973 23 September Cork 3–17 Galway 2–13 Croke Park 73,308 7
1974 22 September Dublin 0–14 Galway 1–6 Croke Park 71,898 5
1975 28 September Kerry 2–12 Dublin 0–11 Croke Park 66,346 7
1976 26 September Dublin 3–8 Kerry 0–10 Croke Park 73,588 7
1977 25 September Dublin 5–12 Armagh 3–6 Croke Park 66,542 12
1978 24 September Kerry 5–11 Dublin 0–9 Croke Park 71,503 17
1979 16 September Kerry 3–13 Dublin 1–8 Croke Park 72,185 11
1980 21 September Kerry 1–9 Roscommon 1–6 Croke Park 63,854 3
1981 20 September Kerry 1–12 Offaly 0–8 Croke Park 61,489 7
1982 16 September Offaly 1–15 Kerry 0–17 Croke Park 62,309 1
1983 18 September Dublin 1–10 Galway 1–8 Croke Park 71,988 2
1984 23 September Kerry 0–14 Dublin 1–6 Croke Park 68,365 5
1985 22 September Kerry 2–12 Dublin 2–8 Croke Park 69,389 4
1986 21 September Kerry 2–15 Tyrone 1–10 Croke Park 68,628 8
1987 20 September Meath 1–14 Cork 0–11 Croke Park 68,431 6
1988 9 October Meath 0–13 Cork 0–12 Croke Park 64,069 1
1989 17 September Cork 0–17 Mayo 1–11 Croke Park 65,519 3
1990 16 September Cork double-dagger 0–11 Meath 0–9 Croke Park 65,723 2
1991 15 September Down 1–16 Meath 1–14 Croke Park 64,500 2
1992[4] 20 September Donegal 0–18 Dublin 0–14 Croke Park 64,547 4
1993 19 September Derry 1–14 Cork 2–8 Croke Park 64,500 3
1994 18 September Down 1–12 Dublin 0–13 Croke Park 58,684 2
1995 17 September Dublin 1–10 Tyrone 0–12 Croke Park 65,000 1
1996 29 September Meath 2–9 Mayo 1–11 Croke Park 65,802 1
1997[5] 28 September Kerry 0–13 Mayo 1–7 Croke Park 65,601 3
1998 27 September Galway 1–14 Kildare 1–10 Croke Park 65,886 4
1999 26 September Meath 1–11 Cork 1–8 Croke Park 63,276 3
2000[6] 7 October Kerry 0–17 Galway 1–10 Croke Park 64,094 4
2001[7] 23 September Galway 0–17 Meath 0–8 Croke Park 70,842 9
2002[8] 22 September Armagh 1–12 Kerry 0–14 Croke Park 79,500 1
2003[9] 28 September Tyrone 0–12 Armagh 0–9 Croke Park 79,394 3
2004[10] 26 September Kerry 1–20 Mayo 2–9 Croke Park 79,749 8
2005[11] 25 September Tyrone 1–16 Kerry 2–10 Croke Park 82,112 3
2006[12] 17 September Kerry 4–15 Mayo 3–5 Croke Park 82,289 13
2007[13] 16 September Kerry 3–13 Cork 1–9 Croke Park 82,126 10
2008[14] 21 September Tyrone 1–15 Kerry 0–14 Croke Park 82,204 4
2009[15] 20 September Kerry 0–16 Cork 1–9 Croke Park 82,246 4
2010[16] 19 September Cork 0–16 Down 0–15 Croke Park 81,604 1
2011[17] 18 September Dublin 1–12 Kerry 1–11 Croke Park 82,300 1
2012[18] 23 September Donegal 2–11 Mayo 0–13 Croke Park 82,269 4
2013[19] 22 September Dublin 2-12 Mayo 1-14 Croke Park 82,274 1
2014 21 September Kerry 2-9 Donegal 0-12 Croke Park 82,184 3

Notes[edit]

A The final was scratched and Louth were awarded the championship after Kerry refused to travel to Dublin as the Great Southern and Western Railway would not sell tickets to their fans at reduced rates.
B Some confusion surrounds 1925. Kerry beat Cavan 1–7 to 2–3 in the semi-final. One source contends that, after an objection by Cavan and counter-objection by Kerry, both sides were disqualified. Another suggests that Cavan won that appeal and then lost to Galway in the final.[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McGee, Eugene (6 February 2006). "First signs that Mayo might be set to turn back the clock". Irish Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 6 February 2006. 
  2. ^ Moran, Seán (26 May 2013). "Donegal hoping to avoid being fifth All-Ireland champions in 20 years to fall at first hurdle in Ulster: Uneasy lies the head that wears the northern crown". The Irish Times (Irish Times Trust). Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  3. ^ Corry, E., 2005. The GAA Book of Lists. Dublin. Hodder Headline Ireland. pp.371–412
  4. ^ "The heroes of '92 - Where are they now?". Donegal Democrat (Johnston Press). 8 January 2009. Retrieved 8 January 2009. 
  5. ^ Whyte, Barry J. (15 September 2006). "Kerry v Mayo Classics: 1997 SFC final". RTÉ Sport (Raidió Teilifís Éireann). Retrieved 15 September 2006. 
  6. ^ "Kerry claim All-Ireland title". BBC Sport (BBC). 7 October 2000. 
  7. ^ "Twelve remain in football championship". Hogan Stand. 17 July 2007. Retrieved 17 July 2007. "They last met in the championship in the 2001 All-Ireland final when Galway powered their way to a nine-point win (0-17 to 0-8) over their fancied opponents." 
  8. ^ Murray, Shane (22 September 2002). "Armagh stun Kerry to claim first All-Ireland". RTÉ Sport (Raidió Teilifís Éireann). Retrieved 22 September 2002. 
  9. ^ "Tyrone are All-Ireland champions". BBC Sport (BBC). 28 September 2003. Retrieved 11 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Breheny, Martin (27 September 2004). "Croker rout as Kerry go heavy on Mayo". Irish Independent (Independent News & Media). Retrieved 27 September 2004. 
  11. ^ "Tyrone are 2005 All-Ireland senior football champions". Hogan Stand. 25 September 2005. Retrieved 25 September 2005. 
  12. ^ "Kerry 4-15 3-5 Mayo". BBC Sport. 17 September 2006. Retrieved 8 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "2007 All-Ireland SFC final: Kerry trounce sad Cork". Hogan Stand. 16 September 2007. Retrieved 16 September 2007. 
  14. ^ Murray, Shane (21 September 2008). "Kerry 0-14 Tyrone 1-15 matchtracker". RTÉ Sport (Raidió Teilifís Éireann). Retrieved 21 September 2008. 
  15. ^ Tasker, Belinda (21 September 2009). "Kennelly enjoys 'emotional' Dublin win". The Sydney Morning Herald (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 21 September 2009. 
  16. ^ Leen, Tony (20 September 2010). "Rebels bring Sam home". Irish Examiner (Thomas Crosbie Holdings). Retrieved 20 September 2010. 
  17. ^ "Cluxton the hero as Dublin win All-Ireland". RTÉ Sport (Raidió Teilifís Éireann). 18 September 2011. Retrieved 18 September 2011. 
  18. ^ Duggan, Keith (24 September 2012). "Sam heads for the hills as Donegal turn perceived football wisdom on its head". The Irish Times (Irish Times Trust). Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  19. ^ "Dublin beat Mayo by a point in All-Ireland football final". BBC Sport (BBC). 22 September 2013. Retrieved 22 September 2013. 
  20. ^ GAA