List of carnivorous plants

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Darlingtonia californica is a carnivorous plant, the sole member of the genus Darlingtonia in the family Sarraceniaceae.

This list of carnivorous plants is a comprehensive listing of all known carnivorous plant species, of which more than 750 are currently recognised.[1] Unless otherwise stated it is based on Jan Schlauer's Carnivorous Plant Database. Extinct taxa are denoted with a dagger (†).

It should be noted that some of the species on this list may not satisfy certain strict definitions of plant carnivory, and could alternatively be characterised as merely paracarnivorous or protocarnivorous.

Extant species[edit]

Aldrovanda[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Brocchinia[edit]

This genus contains around 20 extant species, of which at least two are thought to be carnivorous.

Byblis[edit]

The following list of 8 species is based on Carnivorous Plants of Australia Magnum Opus (2013).[2]

Catopsis[edit]

This genus contains around 20 extant species, of which at least one is thought to be carnivorous.

Cephalotus[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Darlingtonia[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Dionaea[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Drosera[edit]

Drosophyllum[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Genlisea[edit]

The following list of 29 species is based on Monograph of the Genus Genlisea (2012).[3]

Heliamphora[edit]

The following list of 23 species (plus 2 undescribed species) is based on Sarraceniaceae of South America (2011).[4]

Nepenthes[edit]

The following list of 160 species (plus 3 undescribed species) is based on Pitcher Plants of the Old World (2009)[5] and New Nepenthes (2011),[6] with the addition of newly described species.

Philcoxia[edit]

Pinguicula[edit]

Roridula[edit]

Sarracenia[edit]

The following list of 8 species is based on Sarraceniaceae of North America (2011).[7]

Some authorities additionally recognise up to three more species:

Stylidium[edit]

Bud and scape of Stylidium fimbriatum displaying the trichomes that can trap and kill insects.
Stlydium laricifolium print from William Jackson Hooker's 1823 Exotic Flora.
Curtis's Botanical Magazine print of Stylidium scandens.

Triphyophyllum[edit]

This genus contains a single extant species.

Utricularia[edit]

Extinct species[edit]

Aldrovanda[edit]

Numerous extinct species of Aldrovanda have been described, all of which are known only from fossil pollen and seeds (with the exception of A. inopinata, which is also known from fossilised laminae).

Archaeamphora[edit]

Artist's restoration of Archaeamphora longicervia.

This genus contains a single extinct species, described from fossilised leaf material. The identification of Archaeamphora as a pitcher plant (and therefore carnivorous plant) has been questioned by a number of authors.[4][8][9]

Droserapites[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen.

Droserapollis[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen.

Droseridites[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen. Three species of the "Droseridites echinosporus group" have been transferred to the genus Nepenthes (see below).

Fischeripollis[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen.

Nepenthes[edit]

Three species known only from fossil pollen and originally assigned to Droseridites have been transferred to the genus Nepenthes.

Nepenthidites[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen. Droseridites major (Nepenthes major) and Droseridites parvus are considered synonyms of Nepenthidites laitryngewensis by some authorities.[10]

Palaeoaldrovanda[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from what were originally described as fossil seeds. These supposed seeds have subsequently been identified as insect eggs.[8]

Saxonipollis[edit]

This is a form taxon known only from fossil pollen.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lowrie, A. (2013). Preface. In: Carnivorous Plants of Australia Magnum Opus - Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. pp. xi–xiii. ISBN 978-1-908787-11-8.
  2. ^ Lowrie, A. (2013). Byblis. In: Carnivorous Plants of Australia Magnum Opus - Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. pp. 205–237. ISBN 978-1-908787-11-8.
  3. ^ Fleischmann, A. (2012). Monograph of the Genus Genlisea. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. ISBN 978-190-878-700-2.
  4. ^ a b McPherson, S., A. Wistuba, A. Fleischmann & J. Nerz (2011). Sarraceniaceae of South America. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. ISBN 978-0-9558918-7-8.
  5. ^ McPherson, S.R. (2009). Pitcher Plants of the Old World. 2 volumes. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. ISBN 978-0-9558918-2-3. ISBN 978-0-9558918-3-0.
  6. ^ McPherson, S.R. (2011). New Nepenthes: Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. ISBN 978-0-9558918-9-2.
  7. ^ McPherson, S. & D. Schnell (2011). Sarraceniaceae of North America. Redfern Natural History Productions, Poole. ISBN 978-0-9558918-6-1.
  8. ^ a b Heřmanová, Z. & J. Kvaček (2010). Late Cretaceous Palaeoaldrovanda, not seeds of a carnivorous plant, but eggs of an insect. Journal of the National Museum (Prague), Natural History Series, 179(9): 105–118.
  9. ^ Brittnacher, J. (2013). Phylogeny and biogeography of the Sarraceniaceae. Carnivorous Plant Newsletter 42(3): 99–106.
  10. ^ Saxena, R.K. & G.K. Trivedi (2006). A Catalogue of Tertiary Spores and Pollen from India. Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow.