List of textile mills in Cheshire

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Quarry Bank Mill

This is a list of the silk, cotton and other textile mills in Cheshire, England. The first mills were built in the 1760s, in Styal by Samuel Greg using the Arkwright system and were powered by the water of the River Bollin. There were significant early cotton mills; Cheshire was an important centre of the silk industry. Parts of Cheshire have been subsumed into Stockport and Tameside.

River Bollin[edit]

Styal[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Quarry Bank Mill  SJ834830 53°20′38″N 2°15′04″W / 53.344°N 2.251°W / 53.344; -2.251 (Quarry Bank Mill) 1784 Standing 175
Quarry Bank Mill - geograph.org.uk - 1324600.jpg
Notes: This is one of the best preserved textile mills of the Industrial Revolution and is now a museum of the cotton industry. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building.[1] The mill was founded by Samuel Greg in 1784[2] in the village of Styal on the River Bollin. Its original iron water wheel was designed by Thomas Hewes and built between 1816 and 1820. The over head shafts above the machines were attached to the water wheel by a belt. When the water wheel turned, the motion moved the belt and powered the machine.


Macclesfield[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Albert Mill  SJ 9224 7399 53°15′46″N 2°07′04″W / 53.2629°N 2.1178°W / 53.2629; -2.1178 (Albert Mill)[3] 1840
Notes: This mill was erected by the Brocklehursts when they diversified into silk spinning and power weaving.
Albion Mill London Road SJ919729 53°15′11″N 2°07′23″W / 53.253°N 2.123°W / 53.253; -2.123 (Albion Mill)
Macclesfield Albion Mill 1822.JPG
Notes:

[4]

Alma Mill Crompton Road SJ 9106 7357 53°15′33″N 2°08′08″W / 53.2591°N 2.1355°W / 53.2591; -2.1355 (Alma Mill,Crompton Road)[3]
Macclesfield 1510 Crompton Road Alma Mill .JPG
Notes:
Alma Mill Pickford St. 53°15′27″N 2°07′17″W / 53.2575°N 2.1213°W / 53.2575; -2.1213 (Alma Mill,Pickford St)
Alma Mill, Pickford Street from Bailey Court.jpg
Notes:

[5]

Arbourhay Street Mill  SJ 9220 7403 53°15′48″N 2°07′06″W / 53.2632°N 2.1184°W / 53.2632; -2.1184 (Arbourhay Street Mill)[3][6] 1811–31
Notes: Pedimented Mill
Athey Street Mill  SJ 9126 7347 53°15′30″N 2°07′57″W / 53.2582°N 2.1325°W / 53.2582; -2.1325 (Athey Street Mill)[3]
Bank Street Works  SJ 9200 7315 53°15′19″N 2°07′17″W / 53.2553°N 2.1214°W / 53.2553; -2.1214 (Bank Street Works)[3]
Bank Top Mill  SJ 9223 7319 53°15′21″N 2°07′04″W / 53.2557°N 2.1179°W / 53.2557; -2.1179 (Bank Top Mill)[3]
Barn Street Mill  unsited[3]
Bollinside Mill  SJ 9197 7331 53°15′24″N 2°07′18″W / 53.2567°N 2.1218°W / 53.2567; -2.1218 (Bollinside Mill)[3]
Bridge Street Mill  SJ 9142 7334 53°15′25″N 2°07′48″W / 53.2570°N 2.1301°W / 53.2570; -2.1301 (Bridge Street Mill)[3] 1811–31
Bridge Street Mill.jpg
Notes: Pedimented Mill
Brook Mill  53°15′21″N 2°07′08″W / 53.2557°N 2.1188°W / 53.2557; -2.1188 (Brook Mill)
Brookside Mill  SJ 9200 7332 53°15′24″N 2°07′17″W / 53.2568°N 2.1214°W / 53.2568; -2.1214 (Brookside Mill)[3]
Brookside Mill from Brook Street.jpg
Notes:
Brook Street Mills  SJ 9220 7328 53°15′23″N 2°07′06″W / 53.2565°N 2.1184°W / 53.2565; -2.1184 (Brook Street Mill)[3]
Macclesfield Brook Street Mills 1613.JPG
Notes:
Brown Street Mill  SJ 9145 7311 53°15′18″N 2°07′47″W / 53.2549°N 2.1296°W / 53.2549; -2.1296 (Brown Street Mill)[3]
Brown Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
Brunswick Mill Pickford St 53°15′28″N 2°07′30″W / 53.2578°N 2.1251°W / 53.2578; -2.1251 (Brunswick Mill,Pickford St)
Macclesfield Brunswick Mill 1801.JPG
Notes:

[5]

Buckley Street Mill  SJ 9152 7305 53°15′16″N 2°07′43″W / 53.2544°N 2.1286°W / 53.2544; -2.1286 (Buckley Street Mill)[3]
Buckley Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
Byron House London Road SJ919729 53°14′55″N 2°07′17″W / 53.2486°N 2.1215°W / 53.2486; -2.1215 (Byron House,London Road)
Macclesfield Byron House 1825.JPG
Notes:
Catherine Street Mill  SJ 9152 7305 53°15′16″N 2°07′43″W / 53.2544°N 2.1286°W / 53.2544; -2.1286 (Catherine Street Mill)[3]
Chapel Mill  53°15′20″N 2°07′18″W / 53.2556°N 2.1216°W / 53.2556; -2.1216 (Chapel Mill)
Park Green Mill.jpg
Notes:
Charles Street Mill  SJ 9165 7334 53°15′25″N 2°07′36″W / 53.2570°N 2.1266°W / 53.2570; -2.1266 (Charles Street Mill)[3]
19 Charles Street  SJ 916 734 53°15′29″N 2°07′37″W / 53.258°N 2.127°W / 53.258; -2.127[3]
Charlotte Street  SJ 9185 7336 53°15′26″N 2°07′25″W / 53.2572°N 2.1236°W / 53.2572; -2.1236 (Charlotte Street)[3]
Chestergate Mill  SJ9135 7362 53°15′34″N 2°07′52″W / 53.2595°N 2.1311°W / 53.2595; -2.1311 (Chestergate Mill)[3]
Clough Mill  SJ 9212 7306 53°15′16″N 2°07′11″W / 53.2545°N 2.1196°W / 53.2545; -2.1196 (Clough Mill)[3]
Commercial Road Mill  SJ 9195 7377 53°15′39″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2609°N 2.1221°W / 53.2609; -2.1221 (Commercial Road Mills)[3]
Commercial Road/Queen Street Mill  SJ9195 7377 53°15′39″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2609°N 2.1221°W / 53.2609; -2.1221 (Commercial Road/Queen Street Mill)[3]
Commongate Mill  SJ 9210 7364 53°15′35″N 2°07′12″W / 53.2597°N 2.1199°W / 53.2597; -2.1199 (Commongate Mill)[3]
Croft Mill  SJ 9153 7353 53°15′31″N 2°07′42″W / 53.2587°N 2.1284°W / 53.2587; -2.1284 (Croft Mill)[3]
Crompton Road Mill  SJ911736 53°15′32″N 2°08′06″W / 53.259°N 2.135°W / 53.259; -2.135 (Crompton Road Mill)[4]
Cuckstool Pit Hill Mill  SJ 920 736 53°15′32″N 2°07′16″W / 53.259°N 2.121°W / 53.259; -2.121 (Cuckstool Pit Hill Mill)[3]
Dale Street Mill  SJ 9230 7349 53°15′30″N 2°07′01″W / 53.2584°N 2.1169°W / 53.2584; -2.1169 (Dale Street Mill)[3]
Davenport Street Silk Machinery Factory Mill  SJ 9205 7345 53°15′29″N 2°07′14″W / 53.2580°N 2.1206°W / 53.2580; -2.1206 (Davenport Street Silk Machinery Factory Mill)[3]
Depot Mill  SJ 9176 7334 53°15′25″N 2°07′30″W / 53.2570°N 2.1250°W / 53.2570; -2.1250 (Depot Mill)[3]
Dog Lane Mill  SJ 9165 7368 53°15′36″N 2°07′36″W / 53.2601°N 2.1266°W / 53.2601; -2.1266 (Dog Lane Mill)[3]
Duke Street Mill  SJ 9173 7331 53°15′24″N 2°07′31″W / 53.2567°N 2.1254°W / 53.2567; -2.1254 (Duke Street Mill)[3]
11 Duke Street  SJ 916 734 53°15′29″N 2°07′37″W / 53.258°N 2.127°W / 53.258; -2.127 (11 Duke St Mill)[3]
Elizabeth Street Mill  SJ9152 7332 53°15′24″N 2°07′43″W / 53.2568°N 2.1286°W / 53.2568; -2.1286 (Elizabeth St Mill)[3]
Elizabeth Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
Exchange Mill  SJ916 735 53°15′29″N 2°07′37″W / 53.258°N 2.127°W / 53.258; -2.127 (Exchange Mill)[3]
Frosts Mill  SJ919732 53°15′22″N 2°07′23″W / 53.256°N 2.123°W / 53.256; -2.123 (Frosts Mill)[4]
Frosts Mill Macclesfield.jpg
Notes:
Fud Shop  SJ9205 7394 53°15′45″N 2°07′14″W / 53.2624°N 2.1206°W / 53.2624; -2.1206 (Fud Shop)[3]
George Street Mill  SJ919729 53°15′11″N 2°07′23″W / 53.253°N 2.123°W / 53.253; -2.123 (George Street Mill)
George Street Mill.jpg
Notes:

[4]

George Street New Mill  SJ9195 7336 53°15′26″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2572°N 2.1221°W / 53.2572; -2.1221 (George Street New Mill)[3]
Part of the lower town seen from Green Street - geograph.org.uk - 558483.jpg
Notes:
Goodall Street Mill  SJ 9228 7326 53°15′23″N 2°07′02″W / 53.2563°N 2.1172°W / 53.2563; -2.1172 (Goodall Street)[3]
Gosling's, Mill Pickford Street,  SJ9180 7342 53°15′28″N 2°07′28″W / 53.2577°N 2.1244°W / 53.2577; -2.1244 (Gosling's Mill)[3]
Great King Street Mill  SJ9150 7357 53°15′33″N 2°07′44″W / 53.2591°N 2.1289°W / 53.2591; -2.1289 (Great King Street Mill)[3]
Green Street Mill  SJ9208 7343 53°15′28″N 2°07′13″W / 53.2578°N 2.1202°W / 53.2578; -2.1202 (Green Street Mill)[3]
Grosvenor Street Mills  SJ 913 738 53°15′40″N 2°07′55″W / 53.261°N 2.132°W / 53.261; -2.132 (Grosvenor Street Mills)[3]
Gutters Mill  SJ9183 7373 53°15′38″N 2°07′26″W / 53.2605°N 2.1239°W / 53.2605; -2.1239 (Gutters Mill)[3]
Henderson Street Mill  SJ9135 7338 53°15′27″N 2°07′52″W / 53.2574°N 2.1311°W / 53.2574; -2.1311 (Henderson Street Mill)[3]
Henderson Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
Hibel Road Mill  SJ9205 7398 53°15′46″N 2°07′14″W / 53.2628°N 2.1206°W / 53.2628; -2.1206 (Hibel Road Mill)[3]
Hines Factory  SJ920 730 53°15′14″N 2°07′16″W / 53.254°N 2.121°W / 53.254; -2.121 (Hines Factory)[3]
Hope Mill A & B  SJ 9157 7327 53°15′23″N 2°07′40″W / 53.2564°N 2.1278°W / 53.2564; -2.1278 (Hope Mill)[3]
Hurdsfield Road Mills  SJ9220 7403 53°15′48″N 2°07′06″W / 53.2632°N 2.1184°W / 53.2632; -2.1184 (Hurdsfield Road Mills)[3]
Johnson's Mill  unsited[3]
Jordangate Mill  unsited[3]
Kershaw  53°15′28″N 2°07′53″W / 53.2577°N 2.1313°W / 53.2577; -2.1313 (Kershaw)[3]
Kershaw Mill.jpg
Notes:
King Edward Street Mill  SJ9142 7382 53°15′41″N 2°07′48″W / 53.2613°N 2.1301°W / 53.2613; -2.1301 (King Edward Street)[3]
King Edward Street Mill, Macclesfield.jpg
Notes:
30a King Edward Street  SJ 9154 7383 53°15′41″N 2°07′42″W / 53.2614°N 2.1283°W / 53.2614; -2.1283 (King Edward Street)[3]
King Street Mill  SJ9202 7379 53°15′40″N 2°07′16″W / 53.2610°N 2.1211°W / 53.2610; -2.1211 (King Street Mill)[3]
Knight's Mill  SJ922 731 53°15′18″N 2°07′05″W / 53.255°N 2.118°W / 53.255; -2.118 (Knight's mill)[3]
Macclesfield Knights Pool 1605.JPG
Notes:
Knight Street Mill  53°15′18″N 2°07′05″W / 53.255°N 2.118°W / 53.255; -2.118 (Knight Street mill)[3]
Macclesfield Knight Street1604.JPG
Notes:
Lansdowne Street Mills  SJ9220 7403 53°15′48″N 2°07′06″W / 53.2632°N 2.1184°W / 53.2632; -2.1184 (Lansdowne Street Mills)[3]
Little Street Mill  SJ9148 7304 53°15′15″N 2°07′45″W / 53.2543°N 2.1292°W / 53.2543; -2.1292 (Little Street Mill)[3]
London Road Mills  SJ 920 724 53°14′56″N 2°07′16″W / 53.249°N 2.121°W / 53.249; -2.121 (London Road Mills)[3]
London Road Mill - geograph.org.uk - 97372.jpg
Notes:
Lowe Street Mill  SJ9194 7304 53°15′15″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2543°N 2.1223°W / 53.2543; -2.1223 (Lowe Street Mill)[3]
Lower Beech Mill  unsited[3]
Lower Exchange Street B & F Mill  SJ9179 7347 53°15′30″N 2°07′28″W / 53.2582°N 2.1245°W / 53.2582; -2.1245 (Lower Exchange Street)[3]
Lower Heyes Mill  SJ9194 7425 53°15′55″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2652°N 2.1223°W / 53.2652; -2.1223 (Lower Heyes Mill)[3]
Mill Street Mill  unsited[3]
Newgate Mill  SJ916 734 53°15′29″N 2°07′37″W / 53.258°N 2.127°W / 53.258; -2.127 (Newgate Mill)[3]
Oxford Road Mill  SJ909735 53°15′29″N 2°08′17″W / 53.258°N 2.138°W / 53.258; -2.138 (Oxford Road Mill)
Macclesfield Oxford Road Mill 1491.JPG
Notes:

[4]

Paradise Mills  SJ918732 53°15′22″N 2°07′26″W / 53.256°N 2.124°W / 53.256; -2.124 (Paradise Mills) 1860 Standing 154
Macclesfield Paradise Mill 1578.JPG
Notes: Built around 1860. The mill was operated by Cartwright and Sheldon silk weavers from 1912 until 1981. It is now a museum displaying mill life in the 1930s, and 26 Jacquard Looms.[4]
Paradise Street Garret Loom Shops  53°15′23″N 2°07′46″W / 53.2564°N 2.1294°W / 53.2564; -2.1294 (Paradise Street Garret Loom Shops)
Macclesfield Paradise Street Loomshops 1548 .JPG
Notes: This is a row of terraced houses each with a loom shop in the garret. Families used to enter the garret through a trap door
Park Green Mill  SJ9195 7315 53°15′19″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2553°N 2.1221°W / 53.2553; -2.1221 (Park Green Mill)[3]
Park Lane Mill  53°15′22″N 2°07′31″W / 53.2560°N 2.1252°W / 53.2560; -2.1252 (Park Lane Mill)[6] 1811–31
Notes: Pedimented Mill+
Park Mill  SJ9165 7279 53°15′08″N 2°07′36″W / 53.2521°N 2.1266°W / 53.2521; -2.1266 (Park Mill)[3]
Parr Street Shirt Mill  SJ9113 7349 53°15′30″N 2°08′04″W / 53.2583°N 2.1344°W / 53.2583; -2.1344 (Parr Street Shirt Mill)[3]
Peel Street Mill  SJ9170 7273 53°15′05″N 2°07′33″W / 53.2515°N 2.1259°W / 53.2515; -2.1259 (Peel Street Mill)[3]
Pickford Street Mills Pickford St. 53°15′27″N 2°07′21″W / 53.2576°N 2.1226°W / 53.2576; -2.1226 (Pickford Street Mills)[3][5]
Macclesfield Pickford Street Mill 1795.JPG
Notes: Including Pickford Street 'Á' Mill, Pickford Street 'B' Mill, Pickford Street Mill, Pickford Street New Mill 'B',
Pioneer Mill  SJ 9188 7336 53°15′26″N 2°07′24″W / 53.2572°N 2.1232°W / 53.2572; -2.1232 (Pioneer Mill)[7]
Pleasant Street Mill  SJ 9259 7425 53°15′55″N 2°06′45″W / 53.2652°N 2.1126°W / 53.2652; -2.1126 (Pleasant Street Mill)[7]
Pool Street Mill  SJ 9204 7289 53°15′11″N 2°07′15″W / 53.2530°N 2.1208°W / 53.2530; -2.1208 (Pool Street Mill)[7]
Progress Mill  53°15′20″N 2°07′28″W / 53.2555°N 2.1244°W / 53.2555; -2.1244 (Progress Mill)[7]
Regency Mill  Chester Road, 53°15′35″N 2°08′16″W / 53.2598°N 2.1377°W / 53.2598; -2.1377 (Chester Road Mill, Regency Mill)[6][7] 1821–31
Macclesfield Chester Road Mill 1484 .JPG
Notes: Four storey pedimented Mill, aka Regency Mill. It was a steam powered integrated mill including dyeing. The original occupiers were Hapgood and Parker. The steam engine produced 12hp. The main block is 37.5 x 8.00m., the floor separation being 3.00 m.
Rowbotham's Mill  SJ9203 7394 53°15′45″N 2°07′15″W / 53.2624°N 2.1209°W / 53.2624; -2.1209 (Rowbotham's Mill)[7]
Royal Button Mill  SJ 9194 7270 53°15′05″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2513°N 2.1223°W / 53.2513; -2.1223 (Pitt Street Mill)[7]
Old Ribbon Mill Pitt Street Macclesfield.jpg
Notes: Pedimented Mill
Royal Court Mill  53°15′25″N 2°07′19″W / 53.2569°N 2.1219°W / 53.2569; -2.1219 (Royal Court Mill)
Royal Court Mill.jpg
Notes:
Royal Depot Mills  SJ 9176 7334 53°15′25″N 2°07′30″W / 53.2570°N 2.1250°W / 53.2570; -2.1250 (Button Mill)[8] 1744
Royal Depot Mill.jpg
Notes: 1744 Charles Roe built this mill in 1744 specifically to house Italian throwing machines which could produce organziner. Lombes patent on this device had expired in 1732, Logwood Mill in Stockport (then Cheshire) was built that year and Royal Button Mill was the second constructed in Cheshire.
Royal George Mills  SJ9134 7378 53°15′39″N 2°07′53″W / 53.2609°N 2.1313°W / 53.2609; -2.1313 (Royal George Mills)[7]
Royal Silk Warehouse  SJ9188 7375 53°15′39″N 2°07′24″W / 53.2607°N 2.1232°W / 53.2607; -2.1232 (Royal Silk Warehouse)[7]
Royal Silk Warehouse, Macclesfield.jpg
Notes: Extended and converted to a Travelodge Budget Hotel
Ryle Street Mill  SJ9209 7348 53°15′30″N 2°07′12″W / 53.2583°N 2.1200°W / 53.2583; -2.1200 (Ryle Street Mill)[7]
St George's Street Mill  SJ9193 7285 53°15′09″N 2°07′21″W / 53.2526°N 2.1224°W / 53.2526; -2.1224 (St George's Street Mill)[7]
3 St Georges St  SJ 9180 7310 53°15′17″N 2°07′28″W / 53.2548°N 2.1244°W / 53.2548; -2.1244 (3 St Georges St)[3]
Samuel Street Mill  SJ9173 7326 53°15′23″N 2°07′31″W / 53.2563°N 2.1254°W / 53.2563; -2.1254 (Samuel Street Mill)[7]
Short Street Mill  SJ9184 7365 53°15′35″N 2°07′26″W / 53.2598°N 2.1238°W / 53.2598; -2.1238[7]
5 Short St  SJ 9184 7365 53°15′35″N 2°07′26″W / 53.2598°N 2.1238°W / 53.2598; -2.1238[3]
Silk Street Mill  SJ916 734 53°15′29″N 2°07′37″W / 53.258°N 2.127°W / 53.258; -2.127[7]
Smales Mill  ??53°15′26″N 2°07′24″W / 53.2573°N 2.1234°W / 53.2573; -2.1234 (Smales Mill)
Smales Mill.jpg
Notes:
Soho Mill  SJ922 728 53°15′07″N 2°07′05″W / 53.252°N 2.118°W / 53.252; -2.118 (Soho Mill)[7]
Spring Gardens Mill  SJ916 745 53°16′01″N 2°07′37″W / 53.267°N 2.127°W / 53.267; -2.127 (Spring Gardens Mill)[7]
Stanley Street Mill  SJ9159 7373 53°15′38″N 2°07′39″W / 53.2605°N 2.1275°W / 53.2605; -2.1275 (Stanley Street Mill)[7]
Sunderland Street Mill Owner
Pearson Family[7]
 SJ 9192 7348 53°15′30″N 2°07′21″W / 53.2583°N 2.1226°W / 53.2583; -2.1226 (Sunderland Street Mill)
47 Sunderland St  SJ 9189 7310 53°15′17″N 2°07′23″W / 53.2548°N 2.1230°W / 53.2548; -2.1230 (47 Sunderland St)[3]
Sunderland Street 'Slipper' Mill [7]  SJ 9192 7352 53°15′31″N 2°07′21″W / 53.2586°N 2.1226°W / 53.2586; -2.1226 (Sunderland Street Slipper mill)
Sunnyside Mill [7]  SJ 9192 7352 53°15′31″N 2°07′21″W / 53.2586°N 2.1226°W / 53.2586; -2.1226 (Sunnyside Mill)
Sutton Mill  SJ 9198 7276 53°15′06″N 2°07′18″W / 53.2518°N 2.1217°W / 53.2518; -2.1217 (Sutton Mill)[7]
Macclesfield Mill Road 1812.JPG
Notes:
Thorp Street Gas Mill  SJ 9198 7387 53°15′42″N 2°07′18″W / 53.2618°N 2.1217°W / 53.2618; -2.1217 (Thorp Street Gas Mill)[6] 1827 reduced in height in 1977
Notes: Pedimented Mill
Thorp Street Leather Mill  SJ 9194 7395 53°15′45″N 2°07′20″W / 53.2625°N 2.1223°W / 53.2625; -2.1223 (Thorp Street Leather Mill)[6]
Thorp Street Stoneley's Mill  SJ 9196 7389 53°15′43″N 2°07′19″W / 53.2619°N 2.1220°W / 53.2619; -2.1220[6]
Townley Street Mill  53°15′25″N 2°07′24″W / 53.2569°N 2.1233°W / 53.2569; -2.1233 (Townley Street Mill)
Townley Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
Union Mill Elizabeth Street.[6] 53°15′21″N 2°07′46″W / 53.2558°N 2.1294°W / 53.2558; -2.1294 (Union Mill) 1811–31
Notes: Pedimented Mill- location uncertain, as the name is used by several mills. +
Union Street Mill  53°15′24″N 2°07′41″W / 53.2566°N 2.1280°W / 53.2566; -2.1280 (Union Street Mill) 1890
Notes: Now a carpet warehouse, brick built on a grit-stone base+
Victoria Hursfield,  53°15′15″N 2°07′15″W / 53.2541°N 2.1208°W / 53.2541; -2.1208 (Victoria,Hursfield)[9] 1830–40,1880–1890
Victoria Mills  SJ 9205 7300 53°15′14″N 2°07′14″W / 53.2539°N 2.1206°W / 53.2539; -2.1206 (Victoria Mills)[7] 1823 Standing 191
Macclesfield Victoria Mills 1597.JPG
Notes: Victoria Mills, Cross Street, Windmill Street. Built for Winkworth and Proctor. The central block was from 1823, the big mill was 1837, and to the left of the chimney is the 1870 mill.
Vincent Street Mill  SJ 9167 7315 53°15′19″N 2°07′35″W / 53.2553°N 2.1263°W / 53.2553; -2.1263 (Vincent Street Mill)[7]
Vincent Street New Mill  SJ 9311 9162 53°25′17″N 2°06′18″W / 53.4213°N 2.1051°W / 53.4213; -2.1051 (Vincent Street New Mill)[7]
Wardle Street Mill  53°15′21″N 2°07′31″W / 53.2557°N 2.1253°W / 53.2557; -2.1253 (Wardle Street Mill)[6] 1811–31
Notes: Pedimented Mill+
Waterloo Street Mill  SJ 919 737 53°15′36″N 2°07′23″W / 53.260°N 2.123°W / 53.260; -2.123 (Waterloo Street Mill)[7]
Waters Green (Hadfields) Mill  SJ 9202 7379 53°15′40″N 2°07′16″W / 53.2610°N 2.1211°W / 53.2610; -2.1211 (Waters Green (Hadfields) Mill)[7]
Waters Green  53°15′33″N 2°07′23″W / 53.2593°N 2.1230°W / 53.2593; -2.1230 (Waters Green)[7]
Waters Green Mill, Macclesfield.jpg
Notes: Including: Waters Green Mill, Waters Green Mill 'A', Waters Green Mill 'B', Waters Green New Mill. Pedimented Mill
Waterside Mill  SJ 921 731 53°15′18″N 2°07′12″W / 53.255°N 2.120°W / 53.255; -2.120 (Waterside Mill)[7]
Wellington Mill  SJ 918 735 53°15′29″N 2°07′26″W / 53.258°N 2.124°W / 53.258; -2.124 (Wellington Mill)[7]
Whiston Street Mill  SJ9118 7338 53°15′27″N 2°08′01″W / 53.2574°N 2.1337°W / 53.2574; -2.1337 (Whiston Street Mill)[7]
Whitening Croft Mill  SJ 9304 7383 53°15′41″N 2°06′21″W / 53.2614°N 2.1058°W / 53.2614; -2.1058 (Whitening Croft Mill)[7]
Wilshaw Mill  SJ920724 53°14′56″N 2°07′16″W / 53.249°N 2.121°W / 53.249; -2.121 (Wilshaw Mill)[4]
Wood Street Mill  SJ 9175 7337 53°15′26″N 2°07′30″W / 53.2573°N 2.1251°W / 53.2573; -2.1251 (Wood Street Mill)[7]
Wood Street Mill.jpg
Notes:
[3][10]


River Dean[edit]

Bollington[edit]

The Swindells family dominated cotton spinning in Bollington. They operated or owned Ingersley Vale Mill from 1821, Rainow Mill from 1822 both until 1841. They built the Clarence Mill with their partners the Brooke family in 1834, and extended it in 1841, 1854 and 1877. Thomas Oliver & Sons were at the Higher and Lower Mill from 1832 until 1859 and at the Waterhouse Mill from 1841.The Greg family from Quarry Bank Mill and later Reddish bought the Lower House Mill in 1832. The Swindells went on to build the Adelphi Mill in 1856.[11][12]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Adelphi Mill  SJ930773 53°17′35″N 2°06′22″W / 53.293°N 2.106°W / 53.293; -2.106 (Adelphi Mill)
Bollington - Adelphi Mill.jpg
Notes: Adelphi Mill was constructed c. 1868 by Martin Swindells, a local cotton spinner who also owned Clarence Mill in Bollington, he built The Adelphi Mill for his two sons, hence the name 'Adelphi', which is Greek for brothers. It is now converted to offices.Adelphi Mill
Clarence Mill  SJ934782 53°18′04″N 2°06′00″W / 53.301°N 2.100°W / 53.301; -2.100 (Clarence Mill)
Clarence Mill, Macclesfield Canal, Bollington, Cheshire - geograph.org.uk - 568774.jpg
Notes: The Swindells family built the Clarence Mill with their partners the Brooke family in 1834, and extended it in 1841, 1854 and 1877.[11]
Defiance Mill  SJ9373 7798 53°17′55″N 2°05′44″W / 53.2987°N 2.0955°W / 53.2987; -2.0955 (Defiance Mill)[13]
Notes: The mill stands and is now in residential use.[12]
Higher Mill  SJ939776 53°17′42″N 2°05′35″W / 53.295°N 2.093°W / 53.295; -2.093 (Higher Mill)
Lower Mill  SJ938777 53°17′46″N 2°05′38″W / 53.296°N 2.094°W / 53.296; -2.094 (Lower Mill)
Lowerhouse Mill  SJ922777 53°17′46″N 2°07′05″W / 53.296°N 2.118°W / 53.296; -2.118 (Lowerhouse Mill)[14]
Notes: Built in 1818 it is still in industrial use manufacturing coated papers.
Oak Bank Print Works  SJ9380 7790 53°17′53″N 2°05′40″W / 53.2980°N 2.0945°W / 53.2980; -2.0945 (Oak Bank Print Works)[13]
Sowcar Mill  SJ9425 7803 53°17′57″N 2°05′16″W / 53.2992°N 2.0877°W / 53.2992; -2.0877 (Sowcar Mill)[13]
Turner Heath Mill  SJ928 768 53°17′17″N 2°06′32″W / 53.288°N 2.109°W / 53.288; -2.109 (Turner Heath Mill)[13]
Waterhouse Mill  SJ9293 7785 53°17′51″N 2°06′27″W / 53.2976°N 2.1075°W / 53.2976; -2.1075 (Waterhouse Mill)[13][15] 1791 1962 169
Notes: The Firm of "Thomas Oliver & Sons" began, in what was known as "The Bollington Mills" i.e. the "Higher Mill" formerly a Brewery, and the "Lower Mill" afterwards a paper mill. These were leased from Mr Harrop of Stockport, and Mr Creswick of Sheffield, both solicitors. Waterhouse Mill was built in 1790 by Peter Lomas, and acquired by the Olivers through marriage to Mary Lomas. It took water by a leat from the River Dean weir to a mill pond which drove a 23 ft waterwheel, the water passed through a sough (culvert) back into river at the Garden Street bridge.. The first mill burnt down in 1799 and was rebuilt in 1800 and enlarged in 1838. The mills started with jennies, then by 1799 were ordering mules with 216 spindles. The firm produced the finest cotton counts by 1860, they were spinning 220s, and by 1886 420s. In this year ring doubling was introuced. Power was initially by water but a supplementary beam engine was added- and these were replaced in 1906 by a Musgraves horizontal. In 1898 Thomas Oliver & Sons became a part of The Fine Spinners & Doublers Association which was set up to enable cotton mills to trade collectively and benefit from the increased scale. They owned the trademark Happy Valley, and during the First World War made fabric for aeroplane wings and before the second war the thread used for the sports clothes of the England Cricket Team during an Ashes tour to Australia.
[12][13][16]


Rainow[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Brookhouse Clough Mill  SJ 9476 7512[7]
Brookhouse Mill  SJ 9461 7523[7]
Cow Lane Mill  SJ 9457 7580[7]
Gin Clough Mill  SJ958764 53°17′06″N 2°03′50″W / 53.285°N 2.064°W / 53.285; -2.064 (Gin Clough)[17]
The Mill, Ginclough - geograph.org.uk - 169500.jpg
Notes: Water powered mill built in 1794 probably to house spinning jennies. It was financed in 1807 with a loan from the Macclesfield silk manufacturer, John Brocklehurst. And expanded again in 1820.[7]
Hough Hole Mill  SJ944766 53°17′10″N 2°05′06″W / 53.286°N 2.085°W / 53.286; -2.085 (Hough Hole)[17]
Ingersley Vale Works  SJ942744 53°16′01″N 2°05′17″W / 53.267°N 2.088°W / 53.267; -2.088 (Ingersley Vale)[17]
Notes: A cotton spinning mill in 1792 was water powered. The lodge was enlarged, creating Clough Pool in 1803 by Edward Collier. This powered two waterwheels placed above each other. A 18hp steam engine was also present. The mill changed ownership in 1811 and was damaged by fire in 1819. The buildings on the site at this time included a spinning block,owner's house, a warehouse, a smithy and a apprentices house for paupers. The mill was rebuilt by August 1821 by Thomas Gaskell of Ingersley Hall who became a partner with Martin Swindells. By 1826, there were 330 power looms. The Swindells took full control of the site in 1830. In 1842 when James Leigh took over and cotton spinning ceased. The buildings were converted to printing calico, the wheelhouse was rebuilt and a single 56 feet (17 m) diameter wheel was installed, the second largest in Britain. By 1874, the mill had converted to a dyeworks. A J King ran a bleachworks between 1878 and 1929 The first floor of the spinning mill was removed and in 1895, the water wheel was converted to drive a dynamo and all the processes were powered by electric motors. In the later 20th century, the site was sold to Slater, Harrison & Co. and used as letterpress and litho printworks. A fire in November 1999 destroyed the roof and floors of the original mill building and it is currently under restoration.[12]
Ingersley Hall Mill ??  
Lowerhouse Mill  SJ 9538 7656[7]
Millbrook Mill  SJ 9489 7575[7]
Rainow Mill  SJ914775 53°17′38″N 2°07′48″W / 53.294°N 2.130°W / 53.294; -2.130 (Rainow Mill)[7][17]
Rainow Mill Igersley Vale - geograph.org.uk - 358017.jpg
Notes: Founded by Martin Swindells and John and Thomas Fernley in 1822.
Springbank Mill  SJ 9451 7518[7]
Tower Hill Mill  SJ946758 53°16′44″N 2°04′55″W / 53.279°N 2.082°W / 53.279; -2.082 (Tower Hill Mill)[17]
Waulk Mill ??  
[7][17]


River Dane[edit]

Congleton[edit]

Congleton had Englands third oldest silk-throwing mill and spun both cotton and silk. Its prosperity depended on tarifs imposed on imported silk. When the tarifs were removed in the 1860s, the empty mills moved over to fustian cutting. A limited silk ribbon weaving industry survived into 20th century, and woven labels were still being produced to the 1990s. Many mills survive,as industrial or units.[18]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Albany Mill  SJ8614625553°09′36″N 2°12′31″W / 53.1599°N 2.2087°W / 53.1599; -2.2087 (Albany Mill)[13]
Albert Mill  SJ8644630553°09′52″N 2°12′15″W / 53.1644°N 2.2043°W / 53.1644; -2.2043 (Albert Mill)[13] standing
Bank Mill  SJ8689634353°10′04″N 2°11′51″W / 53.1678°N 2.1976°W / 53.1678; -2.1976 (Bank Mill)[13] standing
Bath Vale Mill  SJ873633 53°10′01″N 2°11′28″W / 53.167°N 2.191°W / 53.167; -2.191 (Bath Vale Mill)[20]
Notes: Conder & Company[19]
Booth Street Mill  SJ8543629553°09′49″N 2°13′10″W / 53.1635°N 2.2194°W / 53.1635; -2.2194 (Booth Street Mill)[13]
Booth Street Mill (2)  SJ8544629853°09′49″N 2°13′09″W / 53.1637°N 2.2192°W / 53.1637; -2.2192 (Booth Street Mill (2))[13]
Bridge Mill  SJ8578633153°10′00″N 2°12′51″W / 53.1667°N 2.2142°W / 53.1667; -2.2142 (Bridge Mill)[13][18]
Congleton Bridge Mill 2426.JPG
Notes: Built for fustian, used later for paper, printed-circuit boards and a carpet warehouse.
Bridge Street Mill  SJ8578628753°09′46″N 2°12′51″W / 53.1628°N 2.2141°W / 53.1628; -2.2141 (Bridge Street Mill)[13]
Bromley Road Mill  SJ8651630553°09′52″N 2°12′12″W / 53.1644°N 2.2032°W / 53.1644; -2.2032 (Bromley Road Mill)[13]
Brook Mills  SJ8583631353°09′54″N 2°12′48″W / 53.1651°N 2.2134°W / 53.1651; -2.2134 (Brook Mills)[13][21]
Congleton Brook Mills 2565.JPG
Notes: aka Solly's, BossunsReade and Company Silk Spinners. Brook Mill and the Stone House Green Mill formed a group on the The Howty Brook approached the River Dane.They came into joint ownership in 1852 Brook Mill started as silk throwing and weaving site, Stone House Green Mill was used for short-silk and cotton spinning, but by 1853 they were used for long-silk spinning.

The Reade family was established as cotton manufacturers in Congleton by the end of the 18th century. George Reade d 1837 moved into silk spinning early in the 19th century; George Reade and Son, silk men and silk throwsters, are recorded in Pigot's Directory of 1822. By 1833, the Company's business was described as silk spinners, at Stonehouse Green. In 1834, 3 of his sons established the business of Reade Brothers and Co, silk throwsters and manufacturers of silk goods, also at Stonehouse Green. By 1846 the business was described as silk spinning and working of waste silks. Folkspeare used the mill for tie manufacture from 1941.

By 1850 the Reade family ceased to be involved in the business and the name of the firm was changed to Reade and Co in 1852. National Archives.

[19][21]

Bossun's used part of the mill to manufacture plaster cast figures.

Brookside Mill  SJ858632 53°09′58″N 2°12′50″W / 53.166°N 2.214°W / 53.166; -2.214 (Brookside)[13][20] standing
Brookside Mill suffering from "developers' neglect" - geograph.org.uk - 960882.jpg
Notes: See:Brook Mills
Canal Street Mill  SJ8652621253°09′22″N 2°12′11″W / 53.1560°N 2.2030°W / 53.1560; -2.2030 (Canal Street Mill)[3]
Cross Street Mill  SJ8573630853°09′53″N 2°12′54″W / 53.1646°N 2.2149°W / 53.1646; -2.2149 (Cross Street Mill)[3][18]
Notes: A silk throwing mill converted to fustian cutting then used as a cinema, and a garage.
Dane Mill  SJ 8540 6340 53°10′08″N 2°13′37″W / 53.169°N 2.227°W / 53.169; -2.227 (Dane Mill)[20]
Congleton Dane Mill 2576.JPG
Notes: Bought by the Pearsons in 1830.
Dane Mill (Slate's)  SJ8565632153°09′57″N 2°12′58″W / 53.1658°N 2.2161°W / 53.1658; -2.2161 (Dane Mill (Slate's))[3]
Danebridge Mill  SJ8586623853°09′30″N 2°12′46″W / 53.1584°N 2.2129°W / 53.1584; -2.2129 (Danebridge Mill)[3]
Notes: Now demolished. The first mill was described in 1831:

All that excellent silk mill the property of James Pattison Esq., called New Mill situate on South side of the Bridge over the River Dane in Congleton aforesaid with the engine house adjoining thereto and a capital steam engine of 8 horse power. A part of this mill 48' 9¨ long by 27'4" wide is five storeys in height and other parts of the respective lengths of 31'3¨ by 23' 3¨ and 23' 2¨ by 21' wide are three storeys in height. There is also a building adjoining and connecting with the mill of 3 storeys in height and measuring 26' 6" long by 17' 9" wide.

The second mill had a larger footprint but was only 3 storeys. The mill was from 1890, a fustian cutting mill, and remained so up to 1934. The mill, however, was also occupied by Condura, a subsidiary company of Conlowe Ltd a limited liability company in 1930 (Congleton Chronicle 1932). The company known for 'Judy Frocks' occupied part of the mill, and initially employed around thirty people which grew to 100 people. By 1958, Conlowe companies were subsidiaries of the English Sewing Cotton Company,[22]
Daneside Mill  SJ8575632553°09′58″N 2°12′53″W / 53.1662°N 2.2146°W / 53.1662; -2.2146 (Daneside Mill)[3][18] 1910
Notes: Cotton, silk-throwing, silk-spinning and fustian cutting.
Dane Street Mill  SJ8535631253°09′54″N 2°13′14″W / 53.1650°N 2.2206°W / 53.1650; -2.2206 (Dane Street Mill)[3]
Dane Row Mills??  SJ 896657 53°11′17″N 2°09′25″W / 53.188°N 2.157°W / 53.188; -2.157 (Dane Row Mills)[20]
Dane Valley Mill  SJ 86737 63802 53°10′16″N 2°11′59″W / 53.171161°N 2.199861°W / 53.171161; -2.199861 (Dane Valley Mill)[23]
Dane in Shaw Mill  SJ883620 53°09′18″N 2°10′34″W / 53.155°N 2.176°W / 53.155; -2.176 (Dane in Shaw)[18][20] 1784
Notes: aka Martin's Mill. Symmetrical eighteen bay four storey mill, with pediment over centre two bays, internal waterwheel, clock face in pediment. Mill lodge in front. Built to spin cotton after Arkwright's water frame patent lapsed.
Davenshaw Mill Buglawton,  SJ86606340 53°10′07″N 2°12′05″W / 53.1686°N 2.2015°W / 53.1686; -2.2015 (Davenshaw Mill)[3]
Eaton Bank Mill  SJ86746386 53°10′18″N 2°11′59″W / 53.1717°N 2.1998°W / 53.1717; -2.1998 (Eaton Bank Mill)[3]
Edward Mill  SJ8646630553°09′52″N 2°12′14″W / 53.1644°N 2.2040°W / 53.1644; -2.2040 (Edward Mill)[3]
Elizabeth Mill  SJ8627630353°09′51″N 2°12′24″W / 53.1642°N 2.2068°W / 53.1642; -2.2068 (Elizabeth Mill)[3]
Notes: See Victoria Mill
Fair Mill Worrall Street SJ8597630853°09′53″N 2°12′41″W / 53.1647°N 2.2113°W / 53.1647; -2.2113 (Fair Mill)[3][18][24] 1870 Standing 144
Congleton Fair Mill 2469.JPG
Notes: Used for Fustian in the 1890s, and then for cardboard box manufacture- now a Medical practice. This two-storey building was typical of a fustian mill 8m wide by 49m with a clear uncluttered floor. The boards were 100mm thick. The foof was supported by a king post. The windows are wide with segmented brick arches.
Flint Mill Buglawton  SJ8668637653°10′10″N 2°12′12″W / 53.1695°N 2.2032°W / 53.1695; -2.2032 (Flint Mill)[3]
Notes: See Higher Washford Mill
Forge Mill  SJ8490636053°10′09″N 2°13′38″W / 53.1693°N 2.2273°W / 53.1693; -2.2273 (Forge Mill)[3]
Notes: Run by Peter Wild until 1952 when the firm downsized and moved to Leek.
Foundry Mill  SJ862630 53°09′50″N 2°12′29″W / 53.164°N 2.208°W / 53.164; -2.208 (Foundry)[20]
Havannah St Mills Eaton SJ 896657 53°11′17″N 2°09′25″W / 53.188°N 2.157°W / 53.188; -2.157 (Havannah Street Mills)[3][20]
Congleton Dane Havannah St 2600.JPG
Notes:
Highbank Mill  SJ8627628153°09′44″N 2°12′24″W / 53.1622°N 2.2068°W / 53.1622; -2.2068 (Highbank Mill)[13]
Higher Washford Mill Buglawton SJ 8642 6357 53°10′10″N 2°12′12″W / 53.1695°N 2.2032°W / 53.1695; -2.2032 (Higher Washford)[3][25][26] standing
Congleton Upper Washford Mill 2610.JPG
Notes: The central part, called the Flint Mill was built as a corn mill, then used as a silk mill (c 1828) before working commercially as a flint mill from c1864 until 1958. Dating from the late 18th century, and extended in early and mid nineteenth century, it contains with late 19th and earlier twentieth machinery that was driven by a breast shot cast-iron bucket waterwheel of 18 feet (5.5 m) diameter.
Listed Building NGR: SJ8652563642

The power from the wheel was taken by shafts to the upper floors and to two adjacent textile mills.

Kinsey Street Mill  SJ8605630153°09′50″N 2°12′36″W / 53.1640°N 2.2101°W / 53.1640; -2.2101 (Kinsey Street Mill)[13]
Lower Park Street Mill  SJ8614630153°09′50″N 2°12′32″W / 53.1640°N 2.2088°W / 53.1640; -2.2088 (Lower Park Street Mill)[13]
Lower Spragg Street Mill  SJ8630630053°09′50″N 2°12′23″W / 53.1639°N 2.2064°W / 53.1639; -2.2064 (Lower Spragg Street Mill)[13]
Meadow Mill  SJ860631 53°09′54″N 2°12′40″W / 53.165°N 2.211°W / 53.165; -2.211 (Meadow)[18][20]
Notes: Built in 1864 for silk-throwing, Shephard's then used it for fustian cutting, then was used by Edgar Hallet & Co for making uniform braid. It is now residential.
Moody Street Mill  SJ8587626653°09′39″N 2°12′46″W / 53.1609°N 2.2128°W / 53.1609; -2.2128 (Moody Street Mill)[13]
Old Mill  SJ859632 53°10′00″N 2°12′42″W / 53.1666°N 2.2118°W / 53.1666; -2.2118 (Old Mill)[18][20][27] 1750 2003 246
Old Mill (1753-1830) in 1902.png
Notes: Old Mill was an early silk mill established in the 1753. It used an internal water wheel to power Italian silk throwing machines. It was notable for its size, and for the involvement of James Brindley in its construction. The mill was extended and a beam engine added c.1830, but it was partially demolished in 1939. When, in 2003 the remaining structures were demolished a full archaeological survey was done.

The first silk mill which is the largest and most conspicuous structure in Congleton, is built of brick, with a pediment containing the dialplate of a clock in the centre. It is 240 feet long, 24 feet wide and 48 feet high, consisting of five storeys, and is lighted by 390 windows

1822. Eleven circular throwing machines were housed on the ground floor with winding machines above.In 1771 it employed 600. This was extended by another 17 bays in 1830. The Pearsons bought the mill from the Patinsons in 1830. In 1935 it suffered from subsidence, and Roldane Mill was built for some of the equipment. In 1939, the top three storeys were removed. It continued in use until 1996. It was demolished in 2003.
Park Mill  SJ8625629653°09′49″N 2°12′26″W / 53.1636°N 2.2071°W / 53.1636; -2.2071 (Park Mill)[13][28] 1825
Congleton Park Mill 2532.JPG
Notes: Erected speculatively by 1825 by Charles Townley a builder. The design was the standard format at that time. It had 3 storeys with 15 bays.
Park Street Mill  SJ862629 53°09′47″N 2°12′29″W / 53.163°N 2.208°W / 53.163; -2.208 (Park Street Mills)[20]
Pool Bank Mill  SJ891629 53°09′47″N 2°09′50″W / 53.163°N 2.164°W / 53.163; -2.164 (Pool Bank Mill)[20]
Primrose Vale Mill  SJ8717624153°09′31″N 2°11′36″W / 53.1587°N 2.1933°W / 53.1587; -2.1933 (Primrose Vale Mill)[20]
Prospect Mill  SJ8521629153°09′47″N 2°13′22″W / 53.1631°N 2.2227°W / 53.1631; -2.2227 (Prospect Mill)[20]
Providence Mill  SJ8577632253°09′57″N 2°12′51″W / 53.1659°N 2.2143°W / 53.1659; -2.2143 (Providence)[18][20] 1913 standing 67
Congleton Providence Mill 2572.JPG
Notes: Fustian cutting mill built in 1913, named because it had 13 steps and 13 windows but it would have tempted providence to change it. It was used later,to manufacture childrens' clothing. It was used to print Bingo cards, became derelict in 2003 and has been converted to housing.
Riverside Mill  SJ8595631153°09′54″N 2°12′42″W / 53.1649°N 2.2116°W / 53.1649; -2.2116 (Riverside Mill)[18]
Congleton Meadow Mill Riverside Cigar Mill 2468.JPG
Notes: Built in 1890 for James Collinge, fustian cutter. In 1906 Ansiamio used it to manufacture cigars. Later from the 1950s, it was used for garment manufacture.
Roldane Mill  SJ8592634553°10′00″N 2°12′45″W / 53.1668°N 2.2124°W / 53.1668; -2.2124 (Roldane Mill)[20]
Congleton Mill Green 2421.JPG
Notes: Built in 1934 adjacent to Old Mill for making up of knitted garments. The site is being developed for sheltered housing in 2012.
Royle Street Mill 1  SJ85726327 53°10′05″N 2°12′54″W / 53.168°N 2.215°W / 53.168; -2.215 (Royle Street No 1 Mill)[18][20]
Congleton Mottershead Mill 2425.JPG
Notes: 3 storey mill built by Thomas Vaudrey, used for silk and faustian. It was steam powered from 1826, and later reduced to two storeys and used as a snooker hall.
Royle Street Mill 2  SJ85796335 53°10′05″N 2°12′54″W / 53.168°N 2.215°W / 53.168; -2.215 (Royle Street No 2 Mill)[20]
Salford Mill  SJ857634 53°10′05″N 2°12′54″W / 53.168°N 2.215°W / 53.168; -2.215 (Salford)[18][20]
Congleton Salford Mill 2424.JPG
Notes: Built as a silk mill for Nathaniel Barton, and used as a fustian mill by Edward Knapper and others. It now houses Jantex Furnishings.
Shepherd Mills  SJ8608630853°09′53″N 2°12′35″W / 53.1647°N 2.2097°W / 53.1647; -2.2097 (Shepherds Mill)[13][18] 1890
Congleton Shepherds Mill 2471.JPG
Notes: aka Perserverance Mill. This was built as a fustian mill and was used for shirt manufacture between 1906 and 1959, and for pyjamas from 1960 to 1998.
Shop Lane Mill  SJ8650625053°09′34″N 2°12′12″W / 53.1595°N 2.2034°W / 53.1595; -2.2034 (Shop Lane Mill)[13]
Silk Street Mill  SJ8549659553°11′25″N 2°13′07″W / 53.1904°N 2.2186°W / 53.1904; -2.2186 (Silk Street Mill)[13]
Silver Springs Mills  SJ89562753°09′40″N 2°09′29″W / 53.161°N 2.158°W / 53.161; -2.158 (Silver Springs Mills)[13]
Spindle Street Mill  SJ8634629953°09′50″N 2°12′21″W / 53.1639°N 2.2058°W / 53.1639; -2.2058 (Spindle Street Mill)[13]
Spragg Street Mill  SJ8632629553°09′49″N 2°12′22″W / 53.1635°N 2.2061°W / 53.1635; -2.2061 (Spragg Street Mill)[13]
Stonehouse Green Mill  SJ8579 6301 53°09′50″N 2°12′50″W / 53.1640°N 2.2140°W / 53.1640; -2.2140 (Stonehouse Green Mill)[13] 1780s
Notes: Brook Mill and the Stone House Green Mill formed a group on the The Howty Brook approached the River Dane.They came into joint ownership in 1852 Brook Mill started as silk throwing and weaving site, Stone House Green Mill was built to spin cotton after Arkwright's water frame patent lapsed and was used for both short-silk and cotton spinning, but by 1853 they were used for long-silk spinning. See: Brook Mills
Sunnyside Mill  SJ8620625453°09′35″N 2°12′28″W / 53.1598°N 2.2078°W / 53.1598; -2.2078 (Sunnyside Mill)[13]
Swan Bank Mill  SJ8541631153°09′54″N 2°13′11″W / 53.1649°N 2.2197°W / 53.1649; -2.2197 (Swan Bank Mill)[13] 1876
Notes: A stream driven mill employing 400. Destroyed in 1876
Square Mill  SJ8591631153°09′54″N 2°12′44″W / 53.1649°N 2.2122°W / 53.1649; -2.2122 (Square mill)[13]
Thomas Street Mill  SJ8641 631153°09′54″N 2°12′17″W / 53.1649°N 2.2047°W / 53.1649; -2.2047 (Thomas Street Mill)[13]
Throstles Nest Mill  SJ8664 635853°10′09″N 2°12′05″W / 53.1692°N 2.2013°W / 53.1692; -2.2013 (Throstles Nest Mill)[13]
Timbersbrook Mill  SJ896627 53°09′40″N 2°09′25″W / 53.161°N 2.157°W / 53.161; -2.157 (Timberbrook Mill)[20]
Vale Mill  SJ8576 6270 53°09′40″N 2°12′52″W / 53.1612°N 2.2144°W / 53.1612; -2.2144 (Vale Mill)[13]
Victoria Mill  SJ8627 630353°09′51″N 2°12′24″W / 53.1642°N 2.2068°W / 53.1642; -2.2068 (Victoria Mill)[13] 1822 standing 165
Congleton Victoria Mill Berisford 2477.JPG
Notes: Built by John Hall, a silk-throwster in 1822.Berisford started here in 1872. Run by Berisfords, along with the neighbouring Century Mill weaving sheds, Elizabeth Mill.In 1987 it was turned over to retail.[19]
Victoria Street Mill  SJ85862953°09′47″N 2°12′50″W / 53.163°N 2.214°W / 53.163; -2.214 (Victoria Street Mill)[13]
Wallworth Bank Mill  SJ8632627353°09′41″N 2°12′22″W / 53.1615°N 2.2061°W / 53.1615; -2.2061 (Wallworth Bank Mill)[3]
Washford Mill  SJ8642635753°10′09″N 2°12′17″W / 53.1691°N 2.2046°W / 53.1691; -2.2046 (Washford Mill, Buglawton)[3]
Westfield Mill  SJ8522628453°09′45″N 2°13′21″W / 53.1625°N 2.2225°W / 53.1625; -2.2225 (Westfield Mill)[3]
Worrall Street Mill  SJ861631 53°09′54″N 2°12′32″W / 53.165°N 2.209°W / 53.165; -2.209 (Worral Street)[20]
[20]


Kettleshulme[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Lumbhole Mill  SJ 9882 8038 53°19′13″N 2°01′09″W / 53.3203°N 2.0192°W / 53.3203; -2.0192 (Lumbhole Mill)[3]
Lumb Hole Mill. - geograph.org.uk - 681267.jpg
Notes: The mill was built in 1797 and heightened in 1815 then destroyed by fire in 1822 and rebuilt. It was powered by a cast-iron suspension 7.6m diameter by 1.7m water wheel working in conjunction with a beam engine, The current combination dates from c 1835, though a 10 hp engine was in place in 1816, when Lumbhole mill was being used for silk manufacture by George Brocklehurst. Later it converted to cotton and was known for the production of candlewick by the Sheldon family. The mill was four-storey, 30 yards (27 m) by 11 yards (10 m), it was built from Millstone Grit and had a Queen Post Truss roof


Knutsford[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Silk Street Mill  SJ752 787 53°18′17″N 2°22′25″W / 53.3047°N 2.3736°W / 53.3047; -2.3736 (Silk Street Mill)[3]


Warrington[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Cockhedge Mill  SJ609884 53°23′28″N 2°35′20″W / 53.391°N 2.589°W / 53.391; -2.589 (Cockhedge Mill) 1831
Notes: Cockhedge Mill was a large combined mill (spinning, calico weaving and dying) owned by Armitage and Rigby Ltd (1888). The buildings were commenced in late 1831,[29] but a large fire on 18 June 1872 caused a rebuild. The article about the fire in the Illustrated London News,.[30] It was then a five-storey building employing 900 persons. The report said there were 14,000 throstle spindles and 21,000 mule spindles. The steam engine and 6,000 spindles were saved, and 420 people lost their jobs.
Ashmore 1982, p. 66


Prestbury[edit]

Name Architect Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Butley Mill  SJ89977453°23′28″N 2°35′20″W / 53.391°N 2.589°W / 53.391; -2.589 (Butley)[7]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Quarry Bank Mill". The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage). 2011. Retrieved 2 May 2011 
  2. ^ "Quarry Bank Mill history". Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 163
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Ashmore 1982, p. 44
  5. ^ a b c Calladine, Anthony; Calladine, Anthony; Fricker, Jean (Spring 1988). "Pickford Street: A Study of Macclesfield Textile Mills". Industrial Archaeology Review (Manley) 10 (2): 146–161. doi:10.1179/030907288786472324. Retrieved 19 February 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Calladine & Fricker 1993, pp. 49–50
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap Calladine & Fricker 1993, pp. 36,46
  8. ^ Calladine & Fricker 1993, pp. 11,25
  9. ^ Heritage Explorere
  10. ^ Macclesfield Mill Photos
  11. ^ a b Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 107
  12. ^ a b c d http://happy-valley.org.uk/history/historian_author.htm
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 162
  14. ^ A short history of Bollington Ken Edwards, April 2005
  15. ^ Compiled by Revd. A. C. Oliver (1940). "Thomas Oliver & Sons (Bollington) Ltd.". One hundred and fifty years of Fine Cotton Spinning. Retrieved 23 May 2012. 
  16. ^ Ashmore 1982, p. 30
  17. ^ a b c d e f Ashmore 1982, p. 57
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Fustian Mills Talk Lyndon Murgatroyd 2007
  19. ^ a b c Stephens 1970, p. 147
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Ashmore 1982, pp. 35,38
  21. ^ a b National Archives
  22. ^ Dane Bridge Mill Lyndon Murgatroyd
  23. ^ Textile company
  24. ^ Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 105
  25. ^ Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 98
  26. ^ http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-55948-flint-mill-central-part-of-higher-washfor
  27. ^ Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 84
  28. ^ Calladine & Fricker 1993, p. 45,66
  29. ^ Ashmore 1982, p. 66
  30. ^ Cockhedge Mill Fire Wood engraving 1872

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ashmore, Owen (1982). The industrial archaeology of North-west England. Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-0820-4. 
  • Calladine, Anthony; Fricker (1993). East Cheshire Textile Mills. London: Royal Commission on Historical Monuments of England. ISBN 1-873592-13-2. 
  • Stephens, W. B. (1970). History of Congleton: Published to Celebrate the 700th Anniversary of the Granting of the Charter to the Town. Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-1245-7. 

External links[edit]