List of practical joke topics

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A practical joke (also known as a prank, gag, jape or shenanigan) is a mischievous trick or joke played on someone, typically causing the victim to experience embarrassment, perplexity, confusion, or discomfort.[1] Practical jokes differ from confidence tricks or hoaxes in that the victim finds out, or is let in on the joke, rather than being fooled into handing over money or other valuables. Practical jokes or pranks are generally lighthearted, reversible and non-permanent, and aim to make the victim feel foolish or victimised to a degree, but may also involve cruelty verging on bullying if performed without appropriate finesse.

Practical jokes[edit]

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The 2004 Harvard–Yale prank: Harvard fans holding up Yale's "We Suck" placards

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An April Fools' Day prank marking the construction of the Copenhagen Metro in 2001

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Screenshot of ErrMess Remote Computer client
An exploding cigar pellets advertisement from the January 1917 edition of Popular Mechanics[2]

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Vermin Supreme glitter bombs Randall Terry during a Democratic Party presidential debate

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Hacks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – a hack in progress in Lobby 7

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A lace card from the early 1970s

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Non-human electoral candidates – Dustin the Turkey, a popular Irish television puppet, received thousands of votes in the Republic of Ireland's 1997 presidential election.

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A prank stink bomb

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A Valentine Phantom placed a heart banner at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library on Main Street in Montpelier, Vermont, February 14, 2009.

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See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Practical joke". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 2012-05-27. 
  2. ^ "Exploding Cigar advertisement". Popular Mechanics (Hearst Magazines): 136. January 1917. ISSN 0032-4558.