lowercase people

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See also the independent record label imprint of the same name, Lowercase people records.

lowercase people is an organization that is divided into three major divisions: The lp Online Magazine, lp apparel, and the lowercase people Justice Fund.[1] The organization was founded by the alternative rock band Switchfoot. In late October 2007, the band announced on their YouTube account page that they had created "lp records" to help further the vision of lowercase people.

The lp Online Magazine serves to bring attention to notable works created by artists, writers, and musicians, and to introduce social issues worldwide.[2] The magazine is released quarterly; currently there are three issues. Lowercase people apparel gathers the works of our generations' artists. They are sold as shirts, prints, stickers, and buttons. All profits go towards the Lowercase people Justice Fund. In partnership with Geneva Global, the Lowercase people Justice Fund, a non-profit organization, uses the money gained from the shirts and prints sold to aid Third World communities.

An example is their involvement with the Kuyasa Kids. The Kuyasa Kids are a choir in Africa that are made up of orphans infected with AIDS. Switchfoot has helped them to create a CD which is also sold through Lowercase people.[3] The proceeds will go towards the children's education. Jon Foreman also wrote "The Shadow Proves the Sunshine" in reaction to their work with the Kuyasa Kids. Lowercase people have also collected donations with The Salvation Army for Hurricane Katrina victims.[4] Tim Foreman explains:

"As a rock band, we're not overly idealistic about single-handedly changing the world, but we do know that people are listening to what we have to say ... so we want to use what platform we have been given to make a difference."[3]

"We are humanity: beautiful and broken. We want to collide. We're curious. We're thinking out loud. We are the lowercase people. Join us as we dream."[5] -Chad Butler

Issues[edit]

Issue 1[edit]

Music:

Art:

  • Feature: Art As Play
  • Fine Artists: Jeremey Wright
  • Graphic Artists: Nessim Higson

Words:

  • Feature: A Love Supreme: The Spiritual Life of John Coltrane
  • Interview: David Dark and Chris Ahrens
  • Regulars: Dark Matter: Are You Reality-Based?, and Reasonable Doubts: The Heart of Man
  • Profiles: David Dark, Chris Ahrens, and Charlie Peacock

Justice:

Issue 2[edit]

Music:

Art:

  • Feature: Lain York and J Todd Greene
  • Fine Artists: Lain York and J Todd Greene
  • Graphic Artists: Jeff Kleinsmith

Words:

  • Feature: Between Memory and Mobility
  • Interview: George Plimpton and Ernest Hemingway
  • Regulars: Dark Matter: Getting In on the Act or How to Never Feel Uncool Again, and Reasonable Doubts: The Sea Hags
  • Profiles: Booker Browning, and Cameron Bird

Justice:

  • Feature: Anonymous in India: A travelogue
  • Community: India
  • The Lowercase people Justice Fund
  • Get Involved: Donations

Issue 3[edit]

Music:

Art:

  • Feature: A Conversation between Bobby Bailey and Jeremy Dean
  • Fine Artists: Jeremy Dean and Bobby Bailey
  • Graphic Artists: Bill Caywood

Words:

  • Feature: Where Truth Meets Traction
  • Interview: John Brown’s War on Terror
  • Regulars: Dark Matter: Everybody to the Limit, and Reasonable Doubts: Dodo Does Hollywood
  • Profiles: Won Kim

Justice:

Trivia[edit]

  • The name of the organization is taken from Switchfoot's song, Company Car, in the lines "Now I'm down, under the pavement/ Of Capital Hills and Lowercase people".

References[edit]

  1. ^ Switchfoot's Magazine Features Rwanda and Charity Work. Christian Today, September 6, 2006.
  2. ^ What We Are. Lowercase people.
  3. ^ a b Switchfoot Look Like California Raisins After Video Shoot. MTV News, August 4, 2005.
  4. ^ For The Record: Quick News On Ciara, Game, Switchfoot, Cedric The Entertainer, Creed, Depeche Mode & More. MTV News, September 8, 2005.
  5. ^ FAQ. Land of Broken Hearts.

External links[edit]