Renal calyx

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Renal calyx
Blausen 0592 KidneyAnatomy 01.png
Kidney, with major and minor calyces labeled near bottom.
Kidney PioM.png
Details
Latin calices renales
Ureteric bud
Identifiers
Gray's p.1225
MeSH A05.810.453.537.503
Dorlands
/Elsevier
c_03/12206023
Anatomical terminology

The renal calyces are chambers of the kidney through which urine passes. The minor calyces surround the apex of the renal pyramids. Urine formed in the kidney passes through a renal papilla at the apex into the minor calyx; two or three minor calyces converge to form a major calyx, through which urine passes before continuing through the renal pelvis into the ureter.

Function[edit]

Peristalsis of the smooth muscle originating in pace-maker cells originating in the walls of the calyces propels urine through the renal pelvis and ureters to the bladder.

Clinical significance[edit]

Example of a "staghorn" kidney stone projecting into the renal calyces

A "Staghorn calculi" is a kidney stone that may extend into the renal calyces.

A renal diverticulum is diverticulum of renal calyces.[1][2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Krzeski, T; Witeska, A; Borówka, A; Pypno, W (September 1981). "Diverticula of renal calyces". International Urology and Nephrology 13 (3): 231–235. doi:10.1007/BF02082420. 
  2. ^ Chong, TW; Bui, MH; Fuchs, GJ (Nov 2000). "Calyceal diverticula. Ureteroscopic management.". The Urologic clinics of North America 27 (4): 647–54. doi:10.1016/s0094-0143(05)70114-2. PMID 11098763. 

External links[edit]