Megan McCafferty

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Megan McCafferty
Born Megan Fitzmorris
1973
Occupation Novelist
Nationality United States
Period 2001–present
Genres Young-adult fiction

www.meganmccafferty.com

Megan Fitzmorris McCafferty (born 1973) is an American author known for The New York Times bestselling Jessica Darling series of young-adult novels published between 2001 and 2009.[1][2] McCafferty gained international attention in 2006 when novelist Kaavya Viswanathan was accused of plagiarizing the first two Jessica Darling novels.[3]

Early life[edit]

McCafferty hails from the Bayville section of Berkeley Township, New Jersey, and moved to Brooklyn and Manhattan before settling in Princeton, New Jersey.[4] She graduated from Central Regional High School in Berkeley Township, New Jersey in 1991.[5] McCafferty attended the University of Richmond before transferring to Columbia University to earn a bachelor's degree in English. After graduation, McCafferty worked in magazine publishing as an editor for Cosmopolitan, YM, and Fitness magazines. She began her writing career with writing short stories and articles for various teen magazines.

Jessica Darling series[edit]

McCafferty's first novel, Sloppy Firsts, was published on August 28, 2001.[6] Told from the diary-style perspective of character Jessica Darling herself, the series chronicles her misadventures through high school, college, and beyond.[7] McCafferty subsequently published Second Helpings on April 22, 2003.[8] This was later followed by Charmed Thirds (April 11, 2006),[9] Fourth Comings (August 7, 2007),[10] and Perfect Fifths (April 14, 2009).[11] Perfect Fifths, the fifth and final Jessica Darling novel, is the only book in the series told in third person from the alternating perspectives of Jessica Darling and her long-time love, Marcus Flutie.[7] The third, fourth and fifth books all made the New York Times Best Seller List.[7]

McCafferty also published a Jessica Darling short story called "Fifteen Going On ..." in a May 25, 2004 anthology called Sixteen: Stories About That Sweet and Bitter Birthday, which she also edited.[12]

McCafferty announced in 2012 that she would be publishing a new Jessica Darling prequel series titled 'It List,' aimed at middle-grade readers. The first of the novels, titled 'Jessica Darling's It List #1: The (Notso) Guaranteed Guide to Popularity, Prettiness & Perfection" was published on September 3, 2013.[13] Its sequel will go on sale in September 2014.

Controversy[edit]

In 2006, Harvard student and novelist Kaavya Viswanathan was accused of plagiarizing the work of McCafferty and other writers in her novel How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Life.[3]

Other works[edit]

McCafferty published Bumped, a dystopian young-adult novel, on April 26, 2011.[14][15] Its sequel Thumped was published on April 24, 2012.

She has also contributed to several fiction and nonfiction anthologies. Her work has been translated into eleven languages including Bulgarian, Chinese and German and has been awarded numerous honors by such associations as the American Library Association and the New York Public Library. McCafferty at one time kept what she termed a "retro(blog)" on her website in which she posted actual journal entries and creative writing from her adolescence.

  1. Girls' Night In, edited by Lauren Henderson, Chris Manby and Sarah Mlynowski
  2. It's a Wonderful Lie: 26 Truths About Life in Your Twenties, edited by Emily Franklin
  3. Everything I Needed To Know About Being a Girl I Learned From Judy Blume, edited by Jennifer O'Connell
  4. If I'd Known Then: Women in Their 20s and 30s Write Letters to Their Younger Selves, edited by Ellyn Spragins
  5. A New Dawn: Your Favorite Authors on Stephenie Meyer's Twilight Series, edited by Ellen Hopkins
  6. Does This Book Make Me Look Fat? Stories about loving—and loathing—your body, edited by Marissa Walsh
  7. My Little Red Book, edited by Rachel Kauder Nalebuff

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Authors: Megan McCafferty". RandomHouse.com. Retrieved May 31, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Megan McCafferty: Bio". MeganMcCafferty.com. Retrieved June 7, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Strauss, Gary (May 7, 2006). "How Opal Mehta got shelved". USA Today. USAToday.com. Retrieved May 31, 2009. 
  4. ^ Ervolino, Bill (September 9, 2007). "Jessica's a step behind her author". The Record. "Like her heroine, McCafferty knows her way around the Garden State, having grown up in Bayville before moving to Brooklyn and Manhattan and then getting married and settling in ... Princeton." 
  5. ^ "Darling author returns to Berkeley". Asbury Park Press. September 25, 2007. "BERKELEY: Author Megan McCafferty, a 1991 Central Regional High School graduate, will visit the township branch of the Ocean County Library at 7 pm today." 
  6. ^ "Sloppy Firsts (Hardcover): Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  7. ^ a b c "Megan McCafferty: Books". MeganMcCafferty.com. Retrieved May 31, 2009. 
  8. ^ "Second Helpings (Hardcover): Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  9. ^ "Charmed Thirds (Hardcover): Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  10. ^ "Fourth Comings (Hardcover): Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  11. ^ "Perfect Fifths (Hardcover): Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  12. ^ "'Sixteen: Stories About That Sweet and Bitter Birthday: Reviews and Product Details". Amazon.com. Release date: May 25, 2004. Retrieved May 30, 2009. 
  13. ^ "McCafferty Does Middle Grade for Poppy". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "Bumped by Megan McCafferty". HarperTeen.com. Retrieved May 9, 2011. 
  15. ^ "A Conversation with Megan McCafferty". Bitch Media. Retrieved May 17, 2011. 

External links[edit]