Myron J. Gordon

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Myron J. Gordon
Myron J. Gordon.jpg
Born (1920-10-15)October 15, 1920
Died July 5, 2010(2010-07-05) (aged 89)
Summit, New Jersey
Nationality American
Institution [University of Toronto]]
Field Financial economics
School/tradition Post-Keynesian economics
Alma mater Wisconsin-Madison (B.A. 1941)
Harvard (Ph.D. 1947)
Influences John Maynard Keynes
Contributions Gordon model
Awards Ford Foundation Faculty Fellow (1963)
Connaught Faculty Fellow (1982)
President, American Finance Association (1975)
Fellow, Royal Society of Canada (1993)
Honorary Doctor of Laws, McMaster University (1993)
Honorary Doctor of Laws, University of Toronto (2005)

Myron J. Gordon (October 15, 1920 – July 5, 2010) was an American economist. He was Professor Emeritus of Finance at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. In 1956, Gordon along with Eli Shapiro, published a method for valuing a stock or business, now known as Gordon growth model.[1]

Gordon held a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison (1941), a M.A. from Harvard University (1947), and a Ph.D. from Harvard (1952). He was an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University (1947–1952), then an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1952–1962) and a professor at the University of Rochester (1962–1970) prior to joining the University of Toronto in 1970.[2] His contributions to the field of accounting (and the application of economics and mathematics to accounting) are especially significant and worthy to note. As a leading author of accounting textbooks, he helped educate generations of accounting, business, and management students.

Gordon served as President of the American Finance Association in 1975–1976. He was named a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1993, and received an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree at McMaster University in 1993, and another at the University of Toronto in 2005. He died at the age of 89 at his home in Summit, New Jersey.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gordon, Myron J. (1959). "Dividends, Earnings and Stock Prices". Review of Economics and Statistics 41 (2): 99–105. doi:10.2307/1927792. JSTOR 1927792. 
  2. ^ Myron Gordon's Curriculum Vitae

External links[edit]