North Shore Country Day School

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North Shore Country Day School
North Shore Country Day School's Logo.jpg
Address
310 Green Bay Road
Winnetka, Illinois, Cook County, 60093-4094
United States
Coordinates 42°5′55″N 87°43′45″W / 42.09861°N 87.72917°W / 42.09861; -87.72917Coordinates: 42°5′55″N 87°43′45″W / 42.09861°N 87.72917°W / 42.09861; -87.72917
Information
Type Private country day school
Motto Live and Serve
Founded 1919 (1919)[1]
Founder Perry Dunlap Smith
CEEB Code 144435
Head of school W. Thomas "Tom" Doar III[2][3]
Grades JK12[4]
Enrollment Lower School: 194 students (2014)

Middle School: 126 students (2014)

Upper School: 213 students (2014)

Total: 534 students (2014)

Campus size 16 acres (6.5 ha)[5]
Campus type Suburban
Color(s) Purple and White          [4]
Fight song "O'er the Fields" [4]
Team name Raiders[4]
Rival Latin School of Chicago, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, Lake Forest Academy
Accreditation ISACS
Average ACT scores 30 composite, 28 Math, 33 English, 31 Reading, 29 Science [6]
Newspaper Diller Street Journal[7]
Yearbook Mirror[7]
Website
DST 800.JPG
The Auditorium

North Shore Country Day School is a coeducational prep school in Winnetka, Illinois. It was founded in 1919.[1][8] It consists of a lower school, a middle school, and an upper school.

History[edit]

North Shore Country Day School was founded during the Country Day School movement. There are no class rankings and no academic awards.[9] The founder and first headmaster was Perry Dunlap Smith.[9]

The school was one of 27 schools selected from a group of 250 candidate schools in the U.S. chosen in 1933 for alternative admission standards for admission to 200 selective colleges. As a progressive country day school, there was to be an enriched core curriculum with independent study.[10][11] The school sought to fit the curriculum to the students' needs, rather than to require a fixed course of instruction.[12][13]

At the height of the African-American Civil Rights Movement, in 1963, the school was one of 21 schools that publicly supported the Kennedy administration's policies of racial equality, stating that independent schools must offer the benefits of a quality education to all qualified students.[14]

Athletics[edit]

Physical education is required at all grade levels, and interscholastic competition is required of students in 6th to 11th grades. North Shore is a member of the Chicago Independent School League and competes against eight other prep schools in the Chicago area.[15]

As of 2014, the following sports were available:[16]

Fall
  • Cross Country (coeducational: varsity)
  • Field Hockey (girls: varsity, JV, middle school)
  • Football (boys: varsity, JV, middle school)
  • Golf (varsity and girls varsity)
  • Soccer (boys: varsity, JV, middle school)
  • Tennis (girls: varsity and JV)
  • Volleyball (girls: varsity, JV, freshman/sophomore, middle school)
Winter
  • Basketball (boys and girls: varsity, JV, freshman/sophomore, middle school)
  • Track & Field (boys and girls: varsity)
Spring
  • Baseball (boys: varsity, JV, middle school)
  • Soccer (girls: varsity, JV, middle school)
  • Tennis (boys: varsity, JV)
  • Track & Field (coeducational varsity, boys varsity, middle school)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  2. ^ "Directory". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Administration - General. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  3. ^ "Welcome". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Fast Facts". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  5. ^ "Our Campus". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  6. ^ http://k12.niche.com/north-shore-country-day-school-winnetka-il/
  7. ^ a b "Publications". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  8. ^ "Old-fashioned progressive." Time Apr. 5, 1954. retrieved November 21, 2006
  9. ^ a b Hinchliff, William (Fall 1998). "North Shore Country Day School". The Gazette (Winnetka, Illinois: Winnetka Historical Society). Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  10. ^ "High Schools Begin A Big Experiment; Group Named to Test Newer Methods Under a Revised College Entrance Plan. 200 Colleges To Assist Units Scattered Over the Country Join in Effort to Systematize Student's Educational Career." By Wilford M. Aikin, Chairman Commission on the Relation of School and College. The New York Times. New York, N.Y.: June 4, 1933. pg. E7
  11. ^ "'Progressives' Hail New Type School; Advocates of 'Unshackled' Preparation Say Students Met College Tests. Entered Without Credits Records of 332 Men, Women In 18 Institutions Are Offered for Comparison. Social Problems Emphasized." By Eunive Barnard. The New York Times. New York, N.Y.: August 1, 1937. pg. 77
  12. ^ "Tiny College Offers New Teaching Course; Illinois Institution Trains the Students to Aid Creative Ability of Children," The New York Times. New York, N.Y.: November 21, 1937. pg. 5
  13. ^ [1] Aikin, Wilford M. Adventure In American Education Volume I: The Story of the Eight-Year Study" Publisher: Harper and Brothers;New York and London. 1st edition (1942). ASIN: B000CEBXUU. retrieved November 20, 2006
  14. ^ "Private Schools Support Equality; Racial Statement Backed by 21 Secondary Educators", The New York Times. New York, N.Y.: September 1, 1963. p. 43
  15. ^ "Philosophy". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  16. ^ "Team Pages". Winnetka, Illinois: North Shore Country Day School. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 

External links[edit]