One London

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One London
Leader Damian Hockney
Chairman none
Founded 1 September 2005 (2005-09-01)
Dissolved 17 November 2008 (2008-11-17)
Headquarters 109-110 Bolsover Street
London
W1W 5NT
Ideology Euroscepticism
International affiliation none
European affiliation none
European Parliament group n/a
Colours Black and White with Red
Politics of the United Kingdom
Political parties
Elections

One London was a small British political party formed on 1 September 2005 by Damian Hockney and Peter Hulme-Cross. They were elected to the London Assembly in June 2004 as United Kingdom Independence Party representatives, but in February 2005 announced the formation of the Veritas group at the Assembly. With the disintegration of Veritas after its poor showing in the 2005 general election, Hockney and Hulme-Cross formed One London, with Hockney as leader.

One London became a registered party in November 2005 and de-registered in November 2008.[1]

2008 London Mayoral and Assembly election[edit]

In February 2008 the party announced that Hockney would be its candidate in the 2008 Mayoral election, promising to reverse the current mayor's anti-motorist policies and to halve the GLA portion of the council tax over the four-year mayoral term.[2]

On 27 March 2008 Hockney pulled out of the race to become the mayor of London. He cited a lack of media opportunities for the candidates representing smaller parties as the reason but confirmed that the party would still contest the Assembly election.[3]

The party received just 0.14% of the London-wide list vote, coming last in overall votes and losing both its Assembly seats.

Ideology and policies[edit]

Although UK withdrawal from the European Union was a central policy objective,[4] One London concentrated its efforts on the democratic deficit within London governance[5] and the discrepancy between levels of taxation and public spending in London compared to the rest of the UK.[6] It also called for the abolition of the London congestion charge and claimed to be the first party to have predicted that the cost of the 2012 London Olympics would exceed £10 billion.[7]

Controversy[edit]

The naming of the party as 'One London' caused some comment[8] as the Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, had just started a public campaign under that name[9] as an attempt to build closer relations between ethnic communities following the 7 July 2005 London bombings.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Renamed or Deregistered Parties". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 12 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "Damian Hockney - One London Party Mayoral Candidate". (dead link). 
  3. ^ "Hockney Confirms Mayoral Race Withdrawal". Archived from the original on 29 March 2008. 
  4. ^ "The One London Party supports UK withdrawal from the European Union". Archived from the original on 28 September 2008. 
  5. ^ "Democratic deficit". (dead link). 
  6. ^ "Mind the Spending Gap". (dead link). 
  7. ^ "2012 Olympics". (dead link). 
  8. ^ "Mayor's Anger after UKIP changes name to 'One London'". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. 
  9. ^ "We are Londoners, We are One". Archived from the original on 12 August 2005.