Paul Bunyan (film)

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Paul Bunyan
Directed by Les Clark
Produced by Walt Disney
Written by Lance Nolley
Ted Berman
Starring Thurl Ravenscroft
Dal McKennon
Narrated by Parley Baer
Music by George Bruns
The Mellomen
Production
  company
Walt Disney Feature Animation
Distributed by Buena Vista Home Entertainment (USA)
Release date(s)
  • August 1, 1958 (1958-08-01)
Running time 17 minutes
Country United States

Paul Bunyan is a 1958 animated musical short film released by Walt Disney Studios[1] It was based on the North American folk hero and lumberjack, Paul Bunyan. The film was directed by Les Clark, a member of Disney's Nine Old Men of core animators.[1] Thurl Ravenscroft starred as the voice of Paul Bunyan. Supporting animators on the project included Lee Hartman.[1]

Paul Bunyan received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Short in 1959, but lost to Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny Cartoon, Knighty Knight Bugs.[2]

Plot[edit]

Following a violent windstorm on the coast of Maine, lumberjack Carl McNab spots a giant cradle on the beach containing a giant baby boy. The town adopts and raises the boy, giving him the name Paul Bunyan. One Christmas, the town gives Paul a double-bladed axe to help chop down timber. Paul's work clears open land and allows for the town's expansion of buildings, but unfortunately Paul is too big for it and decides to move out west.

Paul continues to help clear land for farmers in the midwest. During a cold blizzard, Paul rescues a giant ox that became frozen, turning blue from the cold. Paul adopts the ox and names him Babe. The following spring, Paul and Babes footprints through the snow filled up with water and became known as the "Land of 10,000 Lakes." Paul eventually clears the trees from North and South Dakota and digs the Missouri River to flow the logs downstream to the sawmills, and builds Pike's Peak as a lookout, creates the Grand Tetons while playing rough with Babe, and makes Yellowstone Falls as a shower.


Cast and crew[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Wolfe, Jennifer (2012-12-31). "Animator Lee Hartman Dies at 82". Animation World Network. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ "1958 academy awards". Retrieved 2007-09-20. 

External links[edit]